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School of Medicine

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Degree Programs

Established in 1946, the UW School of Medicine is the only medical school for the five-state WWAMI region, and the only five-state medical school in the country. Located in the Warren G. Magnuson Health Sciences Center, the School operates a decentralized program of medical education (WWAMI) via a regional network of teaching affiliates.

The School's basic-science departments provide educational opportunities for students from all schools and colleges within the University. Clinical teaching programs are conducted at the University of Washington Medical Center, Harborview Medical Center, Seattle Children's Hospital, Northwest Hospital & Medical Center, Valley Medical Center, and the Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Healthcare System, as well as at other clinical affiliates in Seattle and throughout the WWAMI states.

The School admits approximately 270 medical students to its first-year class and has a total enrollment of over 1000 students pursuing the Doctor of Medicine degree. The full-time faculty has more than 2,100 members and there are more than 4,500 clinical faculty located throughout the WWAMI region. Enrollment in the graduate programs in the basic sciences exceeds 600 students, and approximately 1,000 postdoctoral fellows are enrolled in advanced training programs. The School has baccalaureate and/or graduate programs in occupational therapy, physical therapy, prosthetics and orthotics, genetic counseling, and medical technology. The School is also home for the Physician Assistant Training Program known as MEDEX.

Doctor of Medicine Program

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Upon completion of the medical student education program curriculum of the School of Medicine, the MD degree is awarded to those candidates who (1) have shown evidence of good moral and ethical character, (2) have satisfactorily completed the requirements of the curriculum, (3) have fulfilled all special requirements, and (4) have discharged all indebtedness to the University of Washington and WWAMI partner universities.

Admission

Procedures and policies are subject to change. The most current information about the admission process is available on the School of Medicine Admissions page.

Medical School Curriculum (For students entering 2017 to 2020; in effect for these four cohorts from 2017 to 2024)

The four-year medical school curriculum consists of three phases, totaling 283 credits.

An Ecology of Health and Medicine/Themes in Medicine course spans all three phases of the curriculum. Students gain familiarity and understanding of our healthcare system, including specifics about health policy, patient safety, social determinants of health, health equity, value-based care, population health, teamwork, medical informatics, and ethics/professionalism.

  1. Foundations Phase
  2. The first 18 months of the medical-student curriculum, starting with a two-week clinical immersion that introduces the medical profession and includes instruction and supervision related to basic clinical skills, is followed by eight integrated basic science blocks. Pathology, Human Form and Function (anatomy and radiology), and Pharmacology are threaded throughout all blocks of the Foundations Phase. In the longitudinal Foundations of Clinical Medicine (FCM) course, which spans all 18 months of the Foundations Phase, students learn under supervision to perform a detailed medical history and physical examination, develop clinical reasoning skills, and communicate and establish rapport with patients from all backgrounds. They also spend one full day every other week working with patients and other health professionals in outpatient primary care clinics.

    Foundations Phase Curriculum (120 credits)

    Most students are also able to take elective courses.

    1. Blocked Courses
      1. Molecular and Cellular Basis of Disease (11 credits)
      2. Invaders and Defenders (10 credits)
      3. Circulatory Systems (16 credits)
      4. Blood and Cancer and Muskuloskeletal (8 credits)
      5. Energetics and Homeostasis (10 credits)
      6. Mind, Brain, and Behavior (14 credits)
      7. Lifecycle (8 credits)
    2. Longitudinal Courses
      1. Foundations of Clinical medicine (15-16 credits)
      2. Ecology of Health and Medicine/Themes in Medicine (4 credits)
    3. Scholarship Courses
      1. Independent Investigative Inquiry (6-7 credits) - Conducted in one or more of the biological, behavioral, sociocultural, or epidemiological sciences basic to medicine, culminating in a scholarly product or written paper. Helps the student gain an understanding of the philosophy and methods of scientific investigation. Fosters skills of life-long learning.
      2. Research Methods, including Epidemiology and Biostatistics (6 credits)
    4. Consolidation and Transition (11 credits) - A transition period between the Foundation Phase and the Patient Care Phase. Preparation for U.S. Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE step 1), including a Foundations Capstone to review key concepts. Students complete the Independent Investigative Inquiry and the transition to clerkships.

  1. Patient Care Phase
  2. Students work as junior members of medical-care teams in medical-school-affiliated hospitals, clinics, or practices located in the five-state WWAMI region. Students learn and practice clinical skills, gain clinical experience, and increase clinical problem-solving abilities.

    Patient Care Curriculum (86 credits)

      1. Family Medicine (12 credits)
      2. Internal Medicine (24 credits)
      3. Obstetrics/Gynecology (12 credits)
      4. Pediatrics (12 credits)
      5. Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (12 credits)
      6. Surgery (12 credits)
      7. Ecology of Health and Medicine (2 credits)
  1. Explore and Focus Phase
  2. Students continue to hone clinical skills and prepare for residency. Includes four required clerkships and 20 weeks of clinical electives.

    Explore and Focus Curriculum (77 credits)

      1. Neurology/Neurosurgery (8 credits)
      2. Emergency Medicine (8 credits)
      3. Advanced Patient Care (16 credits)
      4. Clinical electives (40 credits)*
      5. Ecology of Health and Medicine (1 credit)
      6. Transition to Residency (4 credits)

    *Students in the Medical Scientist Training Program and the UW Pathology fellowship who enter the UWSOM prior to 2015 and who do not engage in the clinical curriculum immediately after completing pre-clinical coursework meet the clinical requirements as they exist at the time they enter, with the exception of 8 credits of clinical electives which are waived. These students enter the clinical curriculum in summer of their third year of MD courses after completion of the PhD or UW Pathology fellowship.

Medical School Curriculum (For students entering 2021 or after)

The four-year medical school curriculum consists of three phases, totaling 280 credits.

A Themes in Medicine course spans all three phases of the curriculum. Students gain familiarity and understanding of our healthcare system, including specifics about health policy, patient safety, social determinants of health, health equity, value-based care, population health, teamwork, medical informatics, and ethics/professionalism.

  1. Foundations Phase
  2. The first 18 months of the medical-student curriculum, starting with a two-week clinical immersion that introduces the medical profession and includes instruction and supervision related to basic clinical skills, is followed by eight integrated basic science blocks. Pathology, Human Form and Function (anatomy and radiology), and Pharmacology are threaded throughout all blocks of the Foundations Phase. In the longitudinal Foundations of Clinical Medicine (FCM) course, which spans all 18 months of the Foundations Phase, students learn under supervision to perform a detailed medical history and physical examination, develop clinical reasoning skills, and communicate and establish rapport with patients from all backgrounds. They also spend one full day every other week working with patients and other health professionals in outpatient primary care clinics.

    Foundations Phase Curriculum (120 credits)

    Most students are also able to take elective courses.

    1. Blocked Courses
      1. Molecular and Cellular Basis of Disease (11 credits)
      2. Invaders and Defenders (10 credits)
      3. Circulatory Systems (16 credits)
      4. Blood and Cancer and Muskuloskeletal (8 credits)
      5. Energetics and Homeostasis (10 credits)
      6. Mind, Brain, and Behavior (14 credits)
      7. Lifecycle (8 credits)
    2. Longitudinal Courses
      1. Foundations of Clinical medicine (15-16 credits)
      2. Themes in Medicine (4 credits)
    3. Scholarship Courses
      1. Independent Investigative Inquiry (6-7 credits) - Conducted in one or more of the biological, behavioral, sociocultural, or epidemiological sciences basic to medicine, culminating in a scholarly product or written paper. Helps the student gain an understanding of the philosophy and methods of scientific investigation. Fosters skills of life-long learning.
      2. Research Methods, including Epidemiology and Biostatistics (6 credits)
    4. Consolidation and Transition (11 credits) - A transition period between the Foundation Phase and the Patient Care Phase. Preparation for U.S. Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE step 1), including a Foundations Capstone to review key concepts. Students complete the Independent Investigative Inquiry and the transition to clerkships.

  1. Patient Care Phase
  2. Students work as junior members of medical-care teams in medical-school-affiliated hospitals, clinics, or practices located in the five-state WWAMI region. Students learn and practice clinical skills, gain clinical experience, and increase clinical problem-solving abilities.

    Patient Care Curriculum (84 credits)

      1. Family Medicine (12 credits)
      2. Internal Medicine (24 credits)
      3. Obstetrics/Gynecology (12 credits)
      4. Pediatrics (12 credits)
      5. Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (12 credits)
      6. Surgery (12 credits)
  1. Explore and Focus Phase
  2. Students continue to hone clinical skills and prepare for residency. Includes four required clerkships and 20 weeks of clinical electives.

    Explore and Focus Curriculum (76 credits)

      1. Neurology/Neurosurgery (8 credits)
      2. Emergency Medicine (8 credits)
      3. Advanced Patient Care (16 credits)
      4. Clinical electives (40 credits)*
      5. Transition to Residency (4 credits)

    *Students in the Medical Scientist Training Program and the UW Pathology fellowship who enter the UWSOM prior to 2015 and who do not engage in the clinical curriculum immediately after completing pre-clinical coursework meet the clinical requirements as they exist at the time they enter, with the exception of 8 credits of clinical electives which are waived. These students enter the clinical curriculum in summer of their third year of MD courses after completion of the PhD or UW Pathology fellowship.

Student Evaluation and Promotion

Students must complete all curricular, academic, and professional conduct requirements, which include meeting the Essential Requirements and Technical Standards and demonstrating attitudes and behavior appropriate to a career in medicine. Student evaluation is based on observation of the student's behavior and conduct by the faculty and others involved in teaching as well as on papers and examinations. Every student must pass all academic requirements, all School of Medicine examinations, Steps 1 and 2 of the United States Medical Licensing Examinations, and an approved scholarly Independent Investigative Inquiry project, as well as demonstrating specific clinical skills developmental benchmarks before receiving the Doctor of Medicine degree. No exceptions are permitted. Periodic reviews of student performance are conducted by the School's Student Progress Committee. Students are informed of deficiencies and remedial requirements, if any, for these deficiencies.

A student may be dismissed from the School of Medicine if s/he does not meet the standards for graduation set by the School, to include failure to maintain an acceptable academic record, failure to follow academic directives provided by the School's committees, and/or failure to develop attitudes and behavioral patterns appropriate to a career in medicine. A pattern of documented concerns about a student's performance and professionalism may result in the student's being dismissed.

The Faculty Council on Academic Affairs (FCAA) reviews the School of Medicine's and Student Progress Committee's actions, and the Dean of the School of Medicine has final approval of the committee's and council's recommendations. Once dismissal or withdrawal from the School has occurred, the student may not petition for reinstatement, and must instead apply for readmission through the standard admission process and procedures.

Honor Societies

Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA), a national honor medical society, elects members on the basis of high scholarship and good moral character. AOA recognizes and perpetuates excellence in the medical profession, with goals to promote scholarship and research in medical school, encourage high standards and conduct, and recognize high attainment in medical science, practice, and related fields.

Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS), a national honor medical society, elects members on the basis of high scholarship and good moral character. GHHS recognizes individuals who are exemplars of humanistic patient care and who can serve as role models, mentors, and leaders in medicine. Goals involve promoting humanism and patient-centered care throughout the medical profession.

Grading System

The Curriculum Office implements and manages guidelines governing the grading system. The Associate Dean for Curriculum collaborates with course and clerkship directors and regional Foundations and Clinical Assistant Deans. The Student Progress Committee reviews all fail grades and the performance of students whose evaluations include a pattern of evaluator or professional development concerns.

The School of Medicine reserves the right to revise or modify the curriculum, system of evaluation, or graduation requirements.

Concurrent Degrees and Oral Maxillofacial Surgery Program

Permission to pursue a concurrent degree is granted only if a student is progressing in a satisfactory manner in the medical school curriculum and shows evidence of being able to take on the additional workload. Participation in a concurrent degree program will delay the student's anticipated date of graduation.

Medical Scientist Training (MD/PhD) Program

Highly qualified candidates have a wide choice of research specializations. Participating graduate departments and interdepartmental disciplines include biochemistry, bioengineering, chemistry, environmental health, epidemiology, genetics, immunology, microbiology, molecular biotechnology, pathology, pharmacology, and physiology and biophysics. Participating programs include neuroscience, molecular and cellular biology, and molecular medicine and mechanisms of disease. Students may also conduct research at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Candidates submit an application and any supplemental material requested by January 1. Consideration is given to applicants with significant research experience and/or a minimum 3.50 cumulative GPA, or minimum MCAT scores of 10 in each category.

Applicants correspond directly with the administrator of the Medical Scientist Training
Program: MSTP
University of Washington
Health Sciences Building, Room I264
Box 357470
Seattle WA 98195-7470
(206) 685-0762
mstp@uw.edu
www.mstp.washington.edu

MD/Master of Health Administration (MD/MPH)

The MD/Master of Public Health (MPH) program allows students who are particularly interested in public health policy, clinical epidemiology, or community-health prevention or health promotion to pursue both the MD and MPH degree concurrently. The program requires one additional full year of coursework dedicated to public health and the submission of a Master's thesis. Application to the MD/MPH occurs during the start of the third year and students would take time away from the medical school curriculum starting in the fourth year. Applicants to the concurrent MD/Master of Public Health (MD/MPH) program must be accepted by both the School of Medicine for the MD degree and by the department of the University of Washington.

MD/Master of Public Health (MD/MHA)

The MD/Master of Health Administration (MHA) allows students particularly interested in management, healthcare policy, or systems-based approach to health care delivery to pursue both the MD and MHA degrees concurrently. Application to the MD/MHA requires one additional full year of coursework and occurs during the start of the third year. Students would take time away from the medical school curriculum starting in the fourth year.

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMS)

The OMS program is a six-year education training program that certifies graduates to practice Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Application to the OMS Program is limited to DDS graduates and occurs prior to matriculation at the School of Medicine. Students admitted to the program have completed dental school and enter into MD training with advance standing. They must meet all of the requirements for both the MD degree and the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery residency in order to remain in the program.

Financial Information

Fees and Other Charges

All fees and extra service charges are payable in U.S. dollars, due at the time specified and subject to change without notice. See Financial Aid Budget Information for current tuition and fees at https://education.uwmedicine.org/student-affairs/financial-aid/

Financial Assistance

Financial aid awards are based on need. All aid applicants must submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The Federal Direct Stafford Loan (subsidized and unsubsidized), Perkins Loan, and Primary Care Loan are the primary sources of aid. Institutional loans are also available from the School of Medicine. Limited grant funds are available to Washington State residents who meet specific funding criteria.

Scholarships are available through the School of Medicine. A separate application for a School of Medicine scholarship is due May 31.

February 28 is the financial aid application deadline for all available aid sources. Late applicants are awarded only Stafford and unsubsidized Stafford loans.

Outside employment is discouraged while the student is enrolled in medical school.

Undergraduate Programs

For undergraduate program information, refer to the UW degree program catalog.

Graduate Programs

For graduate program information, refer to the UW degree program catalog.