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Psychology

Department Overview

119 Guthrie

Psychology involves the scientific study of behavior and its causes and the understanding of human and animal behavior in a variety of settings. Psychology is studied both as a natural science, which stresses physical and biological causes of behavior, and as a social science, which stresses the effects of the social setting on human and animal behavior. Major areas of emphasis are human cognition and perception, animal behavior, behavioral neuroscience, developmental, social and personality, and clinical psychology.

Undergraduate Program

Adviser
119 Guthrie, Box 351525
(206) 543-2698
psyadvis@uw.edu

The Department of Psychology offers the following programs of study:

  • The Bachelor of Science degree with a major in psychology
  • The Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in psychology

The Bachelor of Science program prepares students for doctoral programs in psychology, leading to careers in teaching, research, or clinical psychology. The program emphasizes laboratory/research experience and statistics.

The Bachelor of Arts program provides a general background in psychology for students preparing for master's-level graduate programs or professional schools, seeking employment at the baccalaureate level, or wanting to apply the principles of psychology in other disciplines.

The department does not have formal programs in educational, school, or counseling psychology; engineering psychology; or industrial psychology.

Bachelor of Science

Suggested First-Year College Courses: MATH 120 and MATH 124. PSYCH 101. Any sociology or anthropology course. Students are encouraged to begin completion of general education requirements.

Suggested Second-Year College Courses: PSYCH 202 and PSYCH 209 should be completed as soon as possible during this year; BIOL 118, BIOL 161-BIOL 162, BIOL 180, BIOL 200, or BIOL 220. Students intending to take animal behavior courses in the Psychology Department should plan to fulfill the biology requirement with either BIOL 161-BIOL 162, BIOL 180, or BIOL 200. Continue working toward completion of general education requirements, including foreign language. The foreign language requirement should, ideally, be completed within the first two years of college.

Department Admission Requirements

Students apply to the Department of Psychology under the same admission requirements, regardless of the degree they will pursue.

  1. Minimum cumulative UW GPA of 2.00.
  2. Completion of one of the following math courses with a minimum grade of 2.0: MATH 111, MATH 112, MATH 120, or MATH 124. (Students may fulfill this requirement with test scores that place them in MATH 112 or MATH 124 or higher.)
  3. Completion of the following psychology courses with a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course and a cumulative GPA of 2.50 in the three courses: PSYCH 101, PSYCH 202, and PSYCH 209.
  4. Admission is competitive based on the following criteria:
    1. Preparation for a major in psychology as indicated by the grades earned in courses required for admission
    2. GPA, with an emphasis on grades earned in psychology courses
    3. Other evidence of a commitment to becoming a psychology major
    4. Personal statement reflecting an interest in and commitment to becoming a psychology major
    5. Copies of unofficial transcripts from all schools attended (UW and transfer).
    Meeting the above criteria does not guarantee admission to the department.
  5. The application deadline is the first Friday of autumn, winter, and spring quarters; no applications are accepted summer quarter. Applications and additional information are available in 119A Guthrie.

Major Requirements

84-86 credits as follows:
  1. PSYCH 101, PSYCH 202, PSYCH 209 (with a grade of 2.5 or higher), PSYCH 317 and PSYCH 318
  2. One lab course from PSYCH 330, PSYCH 331, PSYCH 332, PSYCH 361, PSYCH 417, PSYCH 418, or PSYCH 419
  3. One course from PSYCH 300, PSYCH 333, or PSYCH 355
  4. One course from PSYCH 303, PSYCH 305, PSYCH 306, or PSYCH 345
  5. One additional course from PSYCH 300, PSYCH 303, PSYCH 305, PSYCH 306, PSYCH 333, PSYCH 345, or PSYCH 355
  6. Three additional graded upper-division classes with at least one at the 400 level (cannot include PSYCH 491 through PSYCH 499)
  7. PSYCH 499 (3 credits)
  8. PSYCH 496, PSYCH 497, or PSYCH 498 (3 credits) or 3 additional credits of PSYCH 499
  9. Up to 6 credits in 200- to 400-level electives to make a minimum total of 66 psychology credits
  10. (Students may not use PSYCH 200 as an elective if PSYCH 300 is used to fulfill major requirements; or use PSYCH 203 as an elective if PSYCH 303 is used to fulfill major requirements; or use PSYCH 206 as an elective if PSYCH 306 is used to fulfill major requirements; or use PSYCH 245 as an elective if PSYCH 345 is used to fulfill major requirements.)
  11. Courses in related fields:
    1. One of the following MATH sequences: MATH 120 and MATH 124. Students may satisfy this requirement by testing out of MATH 124 or MATH 144
    2. One biological science course from BIOL 118, BIOL 161-BIOL 162, BIOL 180, BIOL 200, or BIOL 220
    3. One of the following philosophy courses: PHIL 120, PHIL 160
    4. One social science course (3 to 5 credits) from anthropology or sociology
  12. Cumulative minimum GPA of 2.50 in all PSYCH courses applied toward the degree (UW and transfer), with a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course presented for the major. Note that a grade of 2.5 or higher is required in PSYCH 209 in order for students to progress to the PSYCH 317/PSYCH 318 statistics series.
  13. Transfer students must meet all of the above requirements and are required to complete at least 15 graded credits in psychology at the 300 and 400 level at the UW.

Bachelor of Arts

Suggested First-Year College Courses: MATH 111, MATH 112, MATH 120, or MATH 124. PSYCH 101. Any sociology or anthropology course. Students are encouraged to begin completion of general education requirements.

Suggested Second-Year College Courses: PSYCH 202 and 209 should be completed as soon as possible during this year. BIOL 118, BIOL 161-BIOL 162, BIOL 180, BIOL 200, or BIOL 220. Students intending to take animal behavior courses in the Psychology Department should plan to fulfill the biology requirement with either BIOL 161-BIOl 162, BIOL 180, or BIOL 200 Continue working toward completion of general education requirements, including foreign language. The foreign language requirement should, ideally, be completed within the first two years of college.

Major Requirements

66 to 68 credits as follows:
  1. PSYCH 101, PSYCH 202, PSYCH 209, PSYCH 315 (or PSYCH 317 and PSYCH 318)
  2. One lab course from PSYCH 330, PSYCH 331, PSYCH 332, PSYCH 361, PSYCH 417, PSYCH 418, or PSYCH 419
  3. One course from PSYCH 300, PSYCH 333, or PSYCH 355
  4. One course from PSYCH 303, PSYCH 305, PSYCH 306, or PSYCH 345
  5. One additional course from PSYCH 300, PSYCH 303, PSYCH 305, PSYCH 306, PSYCH 333, PSYCH 345, or PSYCH 355
  6. Two additional graded upper division classes with at least one at the 400 level (cannot include PSYCH 491 through PSYCH 499)
  7. 3 credits from the following list: PSYCH 494, PSYCH 496, PSYCH 497, PSYCH 498, PSYCH 499; or credit from an approved study abroad program
  8. Up to 4 credits of PSYCH 200- to 400-level electives to make a minimum total of 53 psychology credits
  9. (Students may not use PSYCH 200 as an elective if PSYCH 300 is used to fulfill major requirements; or use PSYCH 203 as an elective if PSYCH 303 is used to fulfill major requirements; or use PSYCH 206 as an elective if PSYCH 306 is used to fulfill major requirements; or use PSYCH 245 as an elective if PSYCH 345 is used to fulfill major requirements.)
  10. Courses in related fields:
    1. One MATH course from MATH 111, MATH 112, MATH 120, MATH 124, or MATH 144. Students may satisfy this requirement by testing out of any of the specified classes.
    2. One biological science course from BIOL 118, BIOL 161-BIOL 162, BIOL 180, BIOL 200, or BIOL 220
    3. One social science course (3 to 5 credits) from anthropology or sociology
  11. Cumulative minimum GPA of 2.50 in all psychology courses applied toward the degree (UW and transfer), with a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course presented for the major
  12. Transfer students must meet all the above requirements and must to complete at least 15 graded credits in psychology at the 300 and 400 level at the UW.

Student Outcomes and Opportunities

  • Learning Objectives and Expected Outcomes: Students understand and apply scientific methods and principles, receive an excellent preparation in the theoretical explanations of human and animal behavior, and understand the introductory concepts underlying the biological basis of behavior.
  • Instructional and Research Facilities: The psychology faculty have extensive research facilities and research laboratories on the UW campus and nearby buildings.
  • Honors Options Available: With College Honors (Completion of Honors Core Curriculum and Departmental Honors); With Honors (Completion of Departmental Honors requirements in the major). See adviser for requirements.
  • Research, Internships, and Service Learning: The Department of Psychology offers academic credit for approved field work experience. The advising office maintains internship listings which are updated regularly.
  • Department Scholarships: None offered.
  • Student Organizations/Associations: Psi Chi (national honors society for undergraduate psychology students).

Of Special Note: A student may earn either a Bachelor of Science or a Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology, but not both.

Graduate Program

Graduate Program Coordinator
306 Guthrie, Box 351525
(206) 543-2563
psygrad@uw.edu

Graduate work in psychology is organized primarily as preparation for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. The optional Master of Science degree is taken by some doctoral students in the course of their work toward the doctorate.

For graduate instruction, the department is organized into six major areas of study: animal behavior, adult and child clinical, cognition and perception, developmental, physiological, and social psychology and personality. Specialization groups also exist in the sub-areas of diversity and self-regulation, and in community, sport, and quantitative psychology.

The program in clinical psychology is accredited by the American Psychological Association and provides scientific and professional training.

Master of Science (Optional)

A master's-degree-only program is not available. Doctoral students have the option of obtaining a master's degree while working toward the PhD.

Graduation Requirements: Completion of first-year graduate program (see Doctor of Philosophy degree requirements below) and an appropriate research program, including a research thesis.

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission Requirements

An undergraduate degree in psychology is desirable, but not required. Some preparation in biological, social, or quantitative sciences is strongly advised. Applicants are judged on a number of criteria, including academic and research backgrounds, Graduate Record Examination scores, and written evaluations submitted by former professors or supervisors. Admission of new students occurs in autumn quarter. The deadline for receipt of admissions material is December 15.

Degree Requirements

Minimum 90 credits, as follows:
  • Coursework:
    • Orientation Week: PSYCH 500 (1)
    • Psychology Colloquium: PSYCH 500 (1)
    • Statistics and General Methodology: During the first year, students must complete each of the following with a minimum grade of 2.7: PSYCH 522 (2), PSYCH 523 (2), PSYCH 524 (4), PSYCH 525 (4).
    • Area Course Requirements: All students are required to take a set of six or more courses as required by the individual areas (see below)
    • Seminars and Advanced Seminars: All students are strongly encouraged to attend a seminar as specified by their area (see below), and to attend the departmental colloquium (PSYCH 550).
    • Substitutions: Potential substitutions should be discussed with the student's adviser and Area Head or Area Representative.
  • Area Requirements:
    • Animal behavior:
      • Core courses: PSYCH 502 (3), PSYCH 503 (4), PSYCH 562 (3)
      • Three additional courses chosen in consultation with adviser. The following courses may be particularly appropriate for animal behavior students: PSYCH 504 (3), PSYCH 505 (4), PSYCH 513 (4)
      • All animal behavior students are strongly encouraged to participate in additional seminars and advanced seminars, both within and outside their area, throughout their graduate careers.
    • Adult Clinical Area:
      • Core courses: PSYCH 517 (3), PSYCH 518 (5), PSYCH 519 (5), PSYCH 511 (3) [PSYCH 594 (5) may be substituted], PSYCH 515 (4) [PSYCH 571 (5) or PSYCH 572 (4) may be substituted]
      • Six additional out-of-area courses. These six courses must meet the APA curriculum guidelines for "breadth of scientific psychology," covering biological, affective-cognitive, and social aspects of behavior as determined by mutual agreement between the student and adviser. Courses should be selected toward developing cohesive themes of subspecialty expertise pertinent to the student's future research and clinical endeavors. Core concepts courses that can be used to meet the APA breadth requirements are as follows: Affective-Cognitive Breadth: PSYCH 507 (3); Social Breadth: PSYCH 510 (4); Biological Breadth: PSYCH 502 (3), PSYCH 503 (4), PSYCH 504 (3), PSYCH 506 (3). Note: PSYCH 594, PSYCH 571, and PSYCH 572 cannot be used as out-of-area courses.
      • One course in community psychology of minority mental health: PSYCH 574 (4), PSYCH 580 (3), or other approved courses.
      • Three courses in clinical issues and methods: PSYCH 591 (1, max. 3), PSYCH 587 (2), PSYCH 588 (2)
      • Two courses in assessment: PSYCH 586 (3); one of the following three courses: PSYCH 576 with PSYCH 590 practicum (5/2), PSYCH 578 with PSYCH 590 (4/2), PSYCH 579 (4)
      • Clinical practica on a continuing basis: PSYCH 589 (4), PSYCH 593 (1-6, max. 24), PSYCH 597 (1-5, max. 36)
      • Seminars and advanced seminars: PSYCH 550 (1-2, max. 30)
      • All clinical students are strongly encouraged to participate in additional seminars and advanced seminars, both within and outside their area, throughout their graduate careers.
      • Other requirements for clinical students: A one-year predoctoral internship
    • Behavioral Neuroscience:
      • Core courses: PSYCH 421 (5), PSYCH 504 (3), NEUBEH 502 (4); two of the following three courses: NEUBEH 501 (3), NEUBEH 503 (4), CONJ 531/CONJ 532 (1.5/1.5)
      • Three additional psychology courses: PSYCH 565 (3); not more than one of the following: PSYCH 423 (5), PSYCH 424 (5), PSYCH 426 (4), PSYCH 427 (5), PSYCH 430 (4); one or more of the following: PSYCH 502 (3), PSYCH 503 (4), PSYCH 506 (3), PSYCH 513 (4)
      • Seminars and advanced seminars: All BNS students are required to take at least three quarters of PSYCH 522 (2). In addition, all BNS students are required to take at least one advanced seminar (usually PSYCH 542), chosen in consultation with the student's adviser.
      • All behavioral neuroscience students are strongly encouraged to participate in additional seminars and advanced seminars, both within and outside their area, throughout their graduate careers.
    • Child Clinical Area:
      • Research methods: PSYCH 529 (5), PSYCH 531 (4)
      • Four courses in child clinical psychology: PSYCH 571 (5), PSYCH 572 (4), PSYCH 576 with PSYCH 590 practicum (5/2), PSYCH 573 (5)
      • Four core concepts courses: PSYCH 513 (4), PSYCH 514 (4), PSYCH 515 (4), PSYCH 517 (3)
      • One course in minority mental health: PSYCH 580 (3)
      • Three courses in clinical issues and methods: PSYCH 591 (1, max. 3), PSYCH 587 (2), PSYCH 588 (2)
      • Clinical practica on a continuing basis: PSYCH 589 (4), PSYCH 593 (1-6, max. 24), PSYCH 597 (1-5, max. 36)
      • One treatment seminar: PSYCH 543 (3-5, max. 30), PSYCH 553 (1-2, max. 30), PSYCH 550 (1-2, max. 30)
      • All child clinical students are strongly encouraged to participate in additional seminars and advanced seminars, both within and outside their area, throughout their graduate careers.
      • Other requirements for child clinical students: A one-year predoctoral internship
    • Cognition and Perception:
      • Core courses: PSYCH 506 (3), PSYCH 507 (3), PSYCH 508 (3)
      • Three additional courses, selected to broaden and deepen the student's understanding of his/her research specialty. These courses should be chosen in consultation with the adviser. They can be additional core concepts courses in any area, or other courses chosen from anywhere on campus, within or outside the Psychology Department.

        The following out-of-area core concepts courses may be particularly appropriate for cognition: PSYCH 504 (3), PSYCH 510 (4), PSYCH 514 (4), PSYCH 515 (4)

      • Seminars and advanced seminars: PSYCH 555 (1-2, max. 30)
      • All Cognition/Perception students are strongly encouraged to participate in additional seminars and advanced seminars, both within and outside their Area, throughout their graduate careers.
    • Developmental Psychology:
      • Research Methods: PSYCH 529 (5)
      • Area course requirements. PSYCH 513 (4), PSYCH 514 (4), PSYCH 515 (4)
      • Three additional courses, selected to broaden and deepen the student's understanding of his/her research specialty. These courses should be chosen in consultation with the adviser. They can be additional core concepts courses in any area, or other courses chosen from anywhere on campus, within or outside the Psychology Department.

        The following out-of-area core concepts courses may be particularly appropriate for Developmental students, depending on the student's research specialty: PSYCH 503 (4), PSYCH 504 (3), PSYCH 507 (3), PSYCH 510 (4), PSYCH 511 (3)

      • In lieu of a core concepts course in child clinical psychology, PSYCH 553 is also recommended for Developmental graduate students.
      • Seminars and advanced seminars: PSYCH 556 (1-2, max. 30)
      • All developmental students are strongly encouraged to participate in additional seminars and advanced seminars, both within and outside their area, throughout their graduate careers.
    • Social Psychology and Personality:
      • In addition to the four statistical courses required by the department, social/personality students are required to take one additional quantitative course, within or outside the department.
      • Core courses: PSYCH 510 (4), PSYCH 511 (3)
      • Four additional courses, selected to broaden and deepen the student's understanding of his/her research specialty. These courses should be chosen in consultation with the adviser. They can be additional core concepts courses in any area, or other courses chosen from anywhere on campus, within or outside the Psychology Department.
      • Seminars and advanced seminars: PSYCH 557 (1-2, max. 30), one additional departmental seminar (PSYCH 550 through PSYCH 558) every quarter throughout the student's graduate career
      • All Social/Personality students are strongly encouraged to participate in additional seminars and advanced seminars, both within and outside their area, throughout their graduate careers.

Assistantships, Fellowships, or Traineeship Opportunities

Research and teaching assistantships are generally available. Traineeships and fellowships are also available.