Energy Research at the University of Washington

Jan Newton

Energy Research Area: Environmental impacts/climate impacts/ocean acidification in the PNW arising as consequences of current energy uses.

Principal Oceanographer, Applied Physics Lab
Affiliate Assistant Professor, School of Oceanography
Applied Physics Lab
College of the Environment
School of Oceanography

I study the variation or change in marine waters from both natural and human-related processes. Regarding human mediated stressors, an important consequence of our current energy use and consumption (e.g. fossil fuel burning) is climate change, both in terms of altered weather (temperature, precipitation, wind patterns, sunlight) and increased CO2. These have implications such as warming waters, altered productivity, and ocean acidification in the marine waters of the Pacific Northwest, including diverse marine environments in the eastern Pacific Ocean, Puget Sound, Hood Canal and other coastal estuaries.

A Networked Profiling Buoy measuring water properties was deployed off Point Wells in Puget Sound in Puget Sound in July 2009; left to right APL technical staff Russ Light, Eric Boget, and project PI Jan Newton
A Networked Profiling Buoy measuring water properties was deployed off Point Wells in Puget Sound in Puget Sound in July 2009; left to right APL technical staff Russ Light, Eric Boget, and project PI Jan Newton

Research Images

The Hood Canal Dissolved Oxygen Program has featured an active citizen monitoring program, with participation by staff of the HC Salmon Enhancement Group, Skokomish and Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribes, and many local citizens

Campus and Other Collaborators/Partners

Record last updated on November 28th 2011 PDT.