Energy Research at the University of Washington

Announcement Archives

Lightning Talks on Marine & Ocean Research 11/6/13

We have a great speaker line up for the November 6th, Lightning Talks on Marine & Ocean Research program at the Seattle Aquarium (6:30 – 9:00pm). Come and support your fellow scientists as they give short (Lightning format) presentations on their research and engage with them afterwards in a Q & A reception. Cash bar and light refreshments will be available. Tickets purchased ahead of time at http://www.seattleaquarium.org/discover-science are $5; $10 at the door. Limited number of free tickets available for undergrad and graduate students; RSVP to Susan Bullerdick at s.bullerdick@seattleaquarium.org by Tuesday November 5.

National Science Board Public Meeting on 9/19/2013

The National Science Board will hold a public meeting on September 19, 2013, hosted at the University of Washington campus. The National Science Board visits a region only once a year, and we are fortunate that they have chosen the UW for this venue. The topic of the public meeting will be centered on “Advanced Cyber Infrastructure for Science and Engineering Research.” As you may know, the National Science Board is composed of 25 members appointed by the President and represents the broad U.S. science and engineering community. The Board establishes the policies of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and serves as an independent policy advisory body to the President and Congress on science and engineering research. Please advertise this meeting in your own unit, as it is open to the public and anyone may attend. It will also be webcasted and we can provide information about that when it becomes available.

Meeting Details:
Date: September 19, 2013
Time: 8:00am-11:00am

UW Today: Transportation fuels from woody biomass promising way to reduce emissions - Rick Gustafson Quoted

UW Today Excerpt: Two processes that turn woody biomass into transportation fuels have the potential to exceed current Environmental Protection Agency requirements for renewable fuels, according to research published in the Forest Products Journal and currently featured on its publications page.

Read the full article in UW Today: http://www.washington.edu/news/2013/05/30/transportation-fuels-from-wood...

UW Today: Remote clouds responsible for climate models’ glitch in tropical rainfall, Frierson and Hwang quoted

It seems counterintuitive that clouds over the Southern Ocean, which circles Antarctica, would cause rain in Zambia or the tropical island of Java. But new research finds that one of the most persistent biases in global climate models – a phantom band of rainfall just south of the equator that does not occur in reality – is caused by poor simulation of the cloud cover thousands of miles farther to the south.

University of Washington atmospheric scientists hope their results help explain why global climate models mistakenly duplicate the inter-tropical convergence zone, a band of heavy rainfall in the northern tropics, on the other side of the equator. The study appears this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

UW Today article features Dean Graumlich: Long-term relationships, access to data drive sustainability institutions’ success

Turns out, the secret to fostering the emerging field of sustainability science is based on some simple and straightforward principles.

Speaking at a national meeting on a panel of academic leaders who focus on natural resource sustainability, College of the Environment Dean Lisa Graumlich said the college’s successful sustainability initiatives are grounded in long-standing relationships among scientists, local communities and decision-makers as well as widely accessible research data and results.
Read the full article: http://www.washington.edu/news/2013/03/11/long-term-relationships-access...

Seattle Times Article on UW and PNNL's Northwest Institute for Advanced Computing

The University of Washington and the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are forming a new enterprise, the Northwest Institute for Advanced Computing, to tackle a wide range of the world’s most vexing issues – from the causes of disease to how climate change will impact the planet.

The institute is designed to find ways to mine the huge amounts of data generated every day by scientific instruments and household electronics, said Doug Ray, associate director of Richland-based PNNL, in a release.

Read the full article in Seattle Times online: http://blogs.seattletimes.com/today/2013/01/new-advanced-computing-insti...

Mary Lidstrom Received ARPA-E Award of $4 million for “Biocatalyst for Small-Scale Conversion of Natural Gas into Diesel Fuel”

DOE’s ARPA-E awards have been announced, and one of the recipients is the University of Washington team led by Mary Lidstrom, Vice Provost for Research and Professor in Chemical Engineering and Microbiology. Sixty-six projects were awarded $130 million for projects that, “…seeks out transformational, breakthrough technologies that show fundamental technical promise but are too early for private-sector investment. These projects have the potential to produce game-changing breakthroughs in energy technology, form the foundation for entirely new industries, and have large commercial impacts.” The awards support Obama’s goals of, “…solving our nation’s most pressing energy challenges.” Lidstrom’s project description is below.

Biocatalyst for Small-Scale Conversion of Natural Gas into Diesel Fuel

UW Receives 2012 International Green Award

The University of Washington is a laboratory for the kind of clean technology that communities of the future will rely on. At the 2012 International Green Awards announced Nov. 20 in London, the UW received a bronze medal for its sustainability efforts in the Most Sustainable Educational Institution competition.

http://f2.washington.edu/ess/news/uw-receives-international-green-award-...

See the updated webpage Discover UW: Sustainability of the Earth

Check out the updated webpage: "Discover UW: Sustainability of the Earth." We are a global leader in environmental science research, education and technology transfer. and this page highlights our activities. See http://www.washington.edu/discover/sustainability/

UW's New Energy Forum- All are welcome!

In the UW's new Energy Forum (http://tinyurl.com/UWeforum) , researchers and industrial practitioners discuss their work on renewable energy, nuclear power, regulatory issues, climate change, and related topics. The Forum is aimed at students interested in careers in the energy sector, but all are welcome to attend.

UW|360 September 2012 - Solar Cell Engineering

Solar cells capture the sun's energy, even in the Northwest! Watch the full episode online at uwtv.org/uw360.

Center for Chemical Innovation receives NSF reauthorization of $20 million

The National Science Foundation has awarded a $20 million grant over five years in reauthorizing the Center for Enabling New Technologies Through Catalysis based at the University of Washington.
Read the full article in UW Today: http://www.washington.edu/news/2012/09/18/center-for-chemical-innovation...

James Murray's Nature article: Oil's tipping Point has passed

The economic pain of a flattering supply will trump the environment as a reason to cure the use of fossil fuels, say James Murray and David King.

Read the full article: http://www.washington.edu/research/.SITEPARTS/.documents/.or/Nature_Comm...

UW Molecular Engineering & Sciences Building Opens to Opportunities

The Molecular Engineering & Sciences building has opened. "We want to try to do something really big," said Pat Stayton, professor of bioengineering and director of the institute. "We hope to generate a lot of knowledge." Read the article in the Seattle Times: http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2019068219_molecularlab05m.html

James W. Murray presenting a seminar on 10/26/12: “Peak fossil fuel energy, an update – energy independence for the US?”

UPDATE - NEW DATE AND TIME: James W. Murray will be giving a seminar on Friday November 2, from 1:30-2:20 pm in 425 Ocean Science Building, titled “Peak fossil fuel energy, an update – energy independence for the US?” Everyone is welcome.

New twist on old chemical process could boost energy efficiency - James Mayer Quoted

Chemical reactions on the surface of metal oxides, such as titanium dioxide and zinc oxide, are important for applications such as solar cells that convert the sun’s energy to electricity. Now University of Washington scientists have found that a previously unappreciated aspect of those reactions could be key in developing more efficient energy systems.

Read the full article in UW Today: http://www.washington.edu/news/2012/06/07/new-twist-on-old-chemical-proc...

Plasma startup creates high-energy light to make smaller microchips; Uri Shumlak and Bruce Nelson Quoted

A University of Washington lab has been working for more than a decade on fusion energy, harnessing the energy-generating mechanism of the sun. But in one of the twists of scientific discovery, on the way the researchers found a potential solution to a looming problem in the electronics industry.

To bring their solution to market two UW engineers have launched a startup, Zplasma, that aims to produce the high-energy light needed to etch the next generation of microchips.

"In order to get smaller feature sizes on silicon, the industry has to go to shorter wavelength light," said Uri Shumlak, a UW professor of aeronautics and astronautics. “We’re able to produce that light with enough power that it can be used to manufacture microchips.”

The UW beam lasts up to 1,000 times longer than competing technologies and provides more control over the million-degree plasma that produces the light.

Read the full article in UW Today:

New twist on old chemical process could boost energy efficiency; James Mayer quoted

Chemical reactions on the surface of metal oxides, such as titanium dioxide and zinc oxide, are important for applications such as solar cells that convert the sun's energy to electricity. Now University of Washington scientists have found that a previously unappreciated aspect of those reactions could be key in developing more efficient energy systems.

Such systems could include, for example, solar cells that would produce more electricity from the sun's rays, or hydrogen fuel cells efficient enough for use in automobiles, said James Mayer, a UW chemistry professor.

Read the full article in UW Today: http://www.washington.edu/news/articles/new-twist-on-old-chemical-proces...