December 2, 2012

GIVING IN ACTION: Making Dreams Come True (Lily)

By UW Foundation

lily

The Teacher
Lily Terese Martin

Areas of study: Education

Big dream: To teach English Language Learners and environmental education in Seattle Public Schools

Dreams supported by: Steve and Stephanie Sarkisian

“My wife Stephanie and I believe strongly that every bright future must have at its core a solid educational foundation. We both attended public schools so we understand the value of public education. We created the Sarkisian Endowed Fellowship in Education to provide assistance and enthusiastic encouragement to aspiring public school teachers like Lily Terese, who will help children succeed in both school and life.” – Steve Sarkisian, UW head football coach

Make a Gift
Help more students like Lily Terese by contributing to the Steve and Stephanie Sarkisian Endowed Fellowship in Education.

IN LILY TERESE’S WORDS: I had worked in a cubicle doing freight logistics for three years, knowing there had to be more. So I decided to travel and ended up teaching English and South Korea for a year. My first day in the classroom, I thought, ‘Yup – this is what I’m supposed to do with my life.’ When I came home to Seattle, I knew returning to school for a master’s degree in teaching was the most meaningful thing I could do.

Before starting my master’s degree at the UW, I completed a graduate certificate at IslandWood, an outdoor education program connected to the UW’s College of Education. It’s a beautiful spot on Bainbridge Island with acres of forests, bogs and beaches perfect for scientific inquiry when you’re 10 years old.

One thing I loved most about teaching there was watching the kids transform. Most had never been on a hike or in the woods before and many were English Language Learners (ELL). Outdoor school inspires kids to communicate despite language or any other barrier – curiosity brings them out of their shells.

Eventually, I’d like to study that crossroad between ELL and environmental education more. I know it helps further English language skills because I saw it happen everyday. Now I’m interested in figuring out why.

Teaching ELL keeps me connected to a multicultural world in my own backyard. The fact that my fellowship comes from the football coach and his wife says a lot about the culture at the UW. As the inaugural Sarkisian Fellow, I hope to learn more about how Coach Sark inspires his team, and how I can use those lessons in my own classroom.


WEBSTRA:

A future in teaching
For Lily Terese Martin, three years working in a cubicle was more than enough. “I knew there had to be more to life. So I decided to travel and ended up teaching English in South Korea for a year,” she says. “My first day in the classroom, I thought, ‘Yup – this is what I’m supposed to do with my life.’”

Breaking barriers
When she returned to Seattle, she enrolled in graduate certificate courses at IslandWood, an outdoor education program connected to the UW’s College of Education. “Many were English Language learners (ELL). Outdoor school inspires kids to communicate despite language or any other barrier,” she says.

The UW and IslandWood
IslandWood is located on 225 acres on Bainbridge Island. Its 10-year partnership with the UW gives grad students an opportunity to complete coursework while teaching science to fourth through sixth graders. Credit from the program can be applied toward the Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction at the UW.

Connecting passions
Her experiences teaching abroad and at IslandWood inspired Lily Terese to investigate the confluence of English Language Learners (ELL) and environmental education at the UW. “Teaching ELL keeps me connected to a multicultural world in my own backyard,” she says.

A future in teaching
For Lily Terese Martin, three years working in a cubicle was more than enough. “I knew there had to be more to life. So I decided to travel and ended up teaching English in South Korea for a year,” she says. “My first day in the classroom, I thought, ‘Yup – this is what I’m supposed to do with my life.’”

Breaking barriers
When she returned to Seattle, she enrolled in graduate certificate courses at IslandWood, an outdoor education program connected to the UW’s College of Education. “Many were English Language learners (ELL). Outdoor school inspires kids to communicate despite language or any other barrier,” she says.

The UW and IslandWood
IslandWood is located on 225 acres on Bainbridge Island. Its 10-year partnership with the UW gives grad students an opportunity to complete coursework while teaching science to fourth through sixth graders. Credit from the program can be applied toward the Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction at the UW.

Connecting passions
Her experiences teaching abroad and at IslandWood inspired Lily Terese to investigate the confluence of English Language Learners (ELL) and environmental education at the UW. “Teaching ELL keeps me connected to a multicultural world in my own backyard,” she says.

Sarkisian support
Lily Terese was awarded the inaugural Sarkisian Endowed Fellowship in Education, an endowment created by the UW’s head football coach, Steve Sarkisian, and his wife, Stephanie. “We created the fellowship to provide assistance and enthusiastic encouragement to aspiring public school teachers like Lily Terese, who will help children succeed in both school and life,” he says.

Integrating leadership with learning
Lily Terese chose the UW because of its integration with the Seattle Public Schools and the College of Education’s reputation in the community and on campus. “The fact that my fellowship comes from the football coach and his wife says a lot about the culture at the UW,” she says.

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