Compliance

April 30, 2020

Know Your Rights and Resources guide Text Only

University of Washington “Know Your Rights & Resources Guide”
May 1, 2020

A guide for students and employees who experience sexual assault, stalking, relationship or intimate partner violence, sexual harassment, and/or other sexual misconduct.

From the Office of the Title IX Coordinator of the University of Washington.

Message from the Title IX Coordinator

Every member of the UW community — student, staff, faculty and other academic personnel—has the right to learn and work in an environment free from sex and gender discrimination, including sexual assault, relationship or intimate partner violence, stalking, sexual harassment, and/or other sexual misconduct.

Sex and gender discrimination impact individuals in different ways and affect people profoundly no matter their gender, sexual orientation, race, religion, ability, or socioeconomic status.

Knowing what options, rights, and resources are available can help individuals determine their best path forward. The Know Your Rights and Resources Guide:

Introduces the University’s professional and compassionate staff who assist students and employees to understand and navigate the support and reporting options that work best for them;

Highlights confidential advocates because they can provide legally-protected confidentiality, specialized expertise, and ongoing support whether or not an individual chooses to make a formal report; and

Emphasizes that individuals who have experienced harm have the right to choose their next steps—if any—including the right to seek support or to make a formal report.

This guide was developed in collaboration with a network of stakeholders—including students, employees, and members of the broader community. Together, we are committed to preventing and addressing sexual harassment, sexual violence, and other forms of sexual misconduct. Please contact me—or any of the staff or offices included in this guide—at any time.

Valery Richardson, Title IX Coordinator

Mags Aleks, Deputy Title IX Coordinator

206.221.7932
titleix@uw.edu
uw.edu/titleix

Where to start
If you have experienced—or think you may have experienced—sexual assault, stalking, relationship or intimate partner violence, sexual harassment, and/or another form of sexual misconduct, resources and options are available to you. Choosing one option does not preclude others; you can pursue any of them at any time.

Confidential advocacy for students and employees (all campuses and locations): UWPD Victim Advocate
206.543.9337, uwpdadvocate@uw.edu.

Confidential advocacy for students:
Seattle campus: 206.685.4357, lwadvoc@uw.edu
Bothell campus: 425.352.3851, uwbvae@uw.edu
Tacoma campus: 253.692.5934, uwtsva@uw.edu

Consultation with confidential advocates is free and available to any member of the UW community. They can help you consider your options and what feels right for any situation.

Confidential Advocates

Consider contacting a confidential advocate before disclosing to other University employees.

The University has caring, specially-trained confidential advocates who provide a place for you to discuss concerns regarding sexual assault, relationship or intimate partner violence, stalking, sexual harassment, and/or other sexual misconduct. Confidential advocates are available during regular business hours at no cost.

When meeting with an advocate, you can share as little or as much information as you choose. Sharing information with a confidential advocate is not the same as making a report to the University for the purpose of starting an investigation.

Advocates can:

Help you understand your rights

Support you in creating a plan for your situation

Connect you with academic or employment support

Inform you of University and police reporting options

Assist you in obtaining a civil protection order, which makes it unlawful for a person to contact you in any way

Refer you to attorneys, as appropriate or requested

Review your housing options, including how to break a lease

Refer you to on- and off-campus resources and service providers

Please note that you do not need to make a report to seek the assistance of a confidential advocate.

SafeCampus

SafeCampus provides consultation and support when you have concerns about inappropriate or unwelcome conduct. You can contact SafeCampus 24 hours a day/7 days a week.

When you contact SafeCampus, a response specialist will assess your needs and help you determine next steps. The response specialist will then summarize the information you provided and share it with a confidential advocate and with the Office of the Title IX Coordinator.

Knowing this, you may choose to remain anonymous when you contact SafeCampus or share limited details about your experience. If the response specialist believes other University professionals need to receive information about your situation—to protect you or the safety of others—SafeCampus will make you aware of that.

SafeCampus does not conduct investigations but, in addition to connecting you with a confidential advocate, that can connect you with an office takes reports and initiates investigations.

SafeCampus is available to all members of the UW community no matter where you live, work, or study. Please visit the SafeCampus website or contact a response specialist if you have questions.

Immediate response and support:

SafeCampus: 206.685.7233 (for all campuses & locations)
washington.edu/safecampus/
For emergency assistance, dial 911

Medical care and Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE)

After an assault you may want to seek medical care, especially if you have concerns about STIs, pregnancy, or physical injuries. Generally, seeking medical care as soon as possible is advised, and some services are time-sensitive. Relevant evidence is best collected within 72 hours but may be collected up to 120 hours after an assault.

Some health care facilities have SANEs who are specially trained to work with patients who have been sexually assaulted. They will explain each step of the process and allow you to make decisions about what you want to do next. A SANE exam is an important way to preserve evidence should you choose to make a police report.

If you have been sexually assaulted, a SANE can offer:

A physical exam that will identify any injuries

Emergency contraception to prevent pregnancy

Sexually-transmitted infection (STI) testing and prophylaxis medication to prevent infection

Optional forensic evidence collection and documentation
Federal and state law protect the confidentiality of medical records. Information retained in medical provider records that is otherwise confidential may be subject to disclosure in response to a valid subpoena or court order.

Health care facilities near UW campuses with Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE):

UW Medical Center, Harborview Medical Center, Valley Medical Center, Swedish Hospital (First Hill), Seattle Children’s Hospital (for individuals under the age of 18)

EvergreenHealth in Kirkland and Redmond

Harrison Medical Center: Bremerton and Silverton; Multicare clinics and hospitals

If a SANE is unavailable, you may be transferred to another medical facility.

Want to talk to someone first?

SafeCampus is available 24 hours a day. Confidential advocates are available Monday—Friday, 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Contact these resources to learn more about seeking medical care and options to preserve evidence.

You may access medical care prior to contacting University support resources or reporting offices.

Counseling and crisis support

Counseling may assist with recovery from a traumatic experience. The University offers short-term counseling for students on its three campuses and referrals to open-ended counseling services off campus.

If you have experienced sexual assault, relationship and intimate partner violence, stalking, sexual harassment, and/or other sexual misconduct, therapy may include:

Providing information about trauma and its effects

Providing information on mindfulness techniques

Providing tools to support healthy sleep, diet, or exercise habits

Helping you identify and deal with negative feelings about the traumatic event, such as feelings of guilt or shame

Helping you identify and deal with negative thoughts about the traumatic event, such as self-blame

Assisting you in reducing anxiety when exposed to people or places that are reminders of the trauma

In general, state law protects the confidentiality of counseling relationships and records. For more specific information about confidentiality, consult with counseling services staff or your counselor who can answer any questions you have. Counselors have limitations on confidentiality when they learn of:

Abuse and neglect of a child under the age of 18

Elder abuse or the abuse of a disabled adult

A plan for suicide or harm to others

Counseling for students:

UW Seattle Counseling Center
(short-term counseling at no cost)
206.543.1240
washington.edu/counseling/

UW Seattle Hall Health Center – Mental Health
(billed to insurance)
206.543.5030
wellbeing.uw.edu/unit/hall-health/

UW Bothell Counseling Center
(short-term counseling at no cost)
425.352.3183
uwb.edu/studentaffairs/counseling

UW Tacoma Counseling Center
(short-term counseling at no cost)
253.692.4522
tacoma.uw.edu/studentcounseling

Counseling for employees:

Counseling support is available for benefits-eligible staff, faculty, and other academic personnel through the University’s employee assistance program.
866.598.3978
(TDD: 800.697.0353)
worklife@uw.edu
hr.uw.edu/benefits/uw-carelink/

Making a plan with support

Supportive measures are often available whether or not a formal report is made or an investigation launched. Most supportive measures involve action taken on your behalf—such as services you access, changes you request, or adjustments you make voluntarily to your work or academic schedule. The University generally cannot impose restrictions on a student or employee until and unless a formal investigation is initiated.

University staff, such as confidential advocates, SafeCampus response specialists, your human resources representative, or Title IX Coordinators, can assist you in seeking supportive measures.

The University can respond to your safety and health concerns by:

Engaging in safety assessment and planning

Identifying referrals for counseling and medical resources

Working with Husky Nightwalk (Seattle campus) or other services that can escort you around UW campuses

Changing your dorm room or residence hall

Increasing the presence of security or UWPD around the buildings where you live, work, or study

Assisting you in obtaining a civil/court-ordered protection order

Disability services and resources

Academic and employment accommodations can be made for a temporary health condition or injury as well as for a permanent disability such as an acute stress disorder developed or triggered as a result of trauma. See “Other Resources” in this guide.

University staff can advocate for academic support, such as:

More time on exams

Extensions for papers or projects

Alterations in course requirements

Modifications to participation requirements

Remote attendance for lectures or classes

Recording of lectures

Switching course or discussion sections

Adjustments to lab or desk space

University staff can advocate for changes in your work environment, such as:

Extensions on specific projects or changes in responsibilities
Alteration of duties to avoid work with/near a specific person

Modification in work schedule

Telecommuting

Changes to your work/desk space

A leave of absence

Changing (temporarily or permanently, pending an investigation) your reporting relationship with your supervisor

If you choose to make a report to the University, an investigator will provide notification to the person alleged to have engaged in the prohibited behavior. The University may then implement protective measures. Examples include:

A temporary no-contact directive

Adjustments to the other person’s living, working, or study spaces

Placing the person who allegedly engaged in prohibited behavior on administrative leave (in work settings)

Title IX protocol

The University’s Title IX protocol is designed to provide support, resources, and options—including the option to report—to any person who has experienced sexual assault, stalking, relationship or intimate partner violence, sexual harassment, and/or other sexual misconduct. SafeCampus, the Office of the Title IX Coordinator, and confidential advocates all play an essential role in supporting affected individuals.

The protocol is initiated when any member of the University community contacts SafeCampus with concerns about sexual misconduct, including notification of an incident.

When SafeCampus is contacted, response specialists will:

Conduct a real-time safety assessment to provide immediate support or safety planning if needed

Provide this guide to the person who has experienced the behaviors or to any caller who can forward this guide to the affected person

Connect the affected person with a confidential advocate who can help explain their rights and options and provide ongoing support if desired

Share the information they have received with the Office of the Title IX Coordinator to allow for an assessment of risk to the University community and to identify any patterns or broader issues related to reported behavior

Provide support and consultation to the caller to assist them in next steps and/or address any other concerns they may have

If an individual situation is determined to be severe, ongoing, or systemic, the Office of the Title IX Coordinator will work with relevant University partners to determine the need for formal action—if any—beyond providing support, resources, and reporting options to the affected person.

Other Resources at UW Seattle:

The University provides a variety of other resources and assistance on the UW Seattle campus.

LiveWell
Provides support to students through advocacy and by helping students address classroom accommodations, financial needs, and other issues affecting their well-being
206.543.2684
livewell@uw.edu
livewell.uw.edu

University Residence Halls and Apartments
Provides assistance regarding University housing
206.543.1000 (RA on duty)
hfsinfo@uw.edu

International Student Services
Provides visa and immigration assistance for students
iss.washington.edu/

Student Financial Aid and Student Fiscal Services
Provides assistance with tuition and other financial issues
f2.washington.edu/fm/sfs/home

Registrar
Provides information about course hardship withdrawals
registrar.washington.edu

Student Legal Services
Provides confidential legal advice and representation for UW Seattle students regarding non-University processes
depts.washington.edu/slsuw/

The Q Center
Provides support to students and employees of all sexual and gender orientations, identities, and expressions
depts.washington.edu/qcenter/wordpress/

Campus Human Resources
Provides resources for staff employees, including Academic Student Employees and student employees
hr.uw.edu/

Academic Human Resources
Provides resources for faculty and other academic personnel
ap.washington.edu/ahr/

Safety resources:

UW Police Department
Non-emergency: 206.685.8973

SafeCampus
24-hour helpline available to report concerns of potential violence or harassment, to engage in safety planning, and to get connected to a confidential advocate and/or other resources
safecampus@uw.edu
206.685.7223
uw.edu/safecampus

UW Shuttles Night Ride
washington.edu/facilities/transportation/uwshuttles/nr
Husky Night Walk (safety escorts on or near campus)
206.685.WALK (9255)

Disability accommodations:

For a temporary health condition and/or permanent disability such as physical injury or acute stress disorder developed as a result of trauma, consider seeking accommodations:

Disability Resources for Students
For matriculated students on the Seattle campus
206.543.8924 (voice and relay)
uwdrs@uw.edu

Disability Services Office
For all University employees
206.543.6450 (voice) or
206.543.6452 (TTY)
dso@uw.edu

Other resources at UW Bothell:

Care Team
Provides support related to concerns about a student’s well-being
uwb.edu/studentaffairs/care-team

Center for International Education
Provides visa and immigration assistance for students
uwb.edu/cie

Office of the Registrar
Provides affected students with assistance regarding course hardship withdrawals
uwb.edu/registration/policies/withdrawing

Organizational Excellence & Human Resources
Provides resources for affected employees
uwb.edu/hr

Disability accommodations
For a temporary health condition and/or permanent disability such as physical injury or acute stress disorder developed as a result of trauma, consider seeking accommodations:

Disability Resources for Students
For matriculated students at UW Bothell
425.352.5307 (voice) or
425.352.5303 (TTY)
uwbdrs@uwb.edu

Disability Services Office
For all employees
206.543.6450 (voice) or
206.543.6452 (TTY)
dso@uw.edu

UW Bothell safety resources:

Campus Safety Office
425.352.5359 (non-emergency)

SafeCampus
24-hour helpline available to report concerns of potential violence and/or harassment, to engage in safety planning, and to get connected to a confidential advocate and/or other resources
206.685.7223
uw.edu/safecampus

Other resources at UW Tacoma:

Student Health Services
Office visits provided at no cost
tacoma.uw.edu/studenthealth

International Student Services
Provides visa assistance for affected students
tacoma.uw.edu/iss

Office of the Registrar
Provides affected students with assistance regarding course hardship withdrawals
tacoma.uw.edu/office-registrar/withdrawal-policies

Human Resources
Provides resources for affected employees
tacoma.uw.edu/hr/home

Disability accommodations
For a temporary health condition and/or permanent disability such as physical injury or acute stress disorder developed as a result of trauma, consider seeking accommodations:

Disability Resources for Students
For matriculated students at UW Tacoma
253.692.4508 (voice)
drsuwt@uw.edu

Disability Services Office
For all employees
206.543.6450 (voice) or
206.543.6452 (TTY)
dso@uw.edu

UW Tacoma safety resources:

Campus Safety and Security
253.692.4416 (non-emergency)

SafeCampus
24-hour helpline available to report concerns of potential violence and/or harassment, to engage in safety planning, and to get connected to a confidential advocate and/or other resources
206.685.7223
uw.edu/safecampus

Other resources in the community:

Harborview Abuse and Trauma Center / Center for Sexual Assault and Traumatic Stress
206.744.1600

King County Sexual Assault Resource Center
888.99.VOICE (86423) (24-hour Resource Line)
kcsarc.org

New Beginnings – Ending Domestic Violence
206.522.9472 (24-hour Helpline)
newbegin.org

The Northwest Network of Bi, Trans, Lesbian & Gay Survivors of Abuse
206.568.7777
nwnetwork.org

Abused Deaf Women’s Advocacy Services
206.812.1001
adwas.org

Rebuilding Hope!
The Sexual Assault Center for Pierce County
24-hour Crisis, Information and Referral Line
800.756.7273
sexualassaultcenter.com

Crystal Judson Family Justice Center (Tacoma)
(serving domestic violence victims and their children)
253.798.4166 (Helpline)
aplaceofhelp.com

LifeWire – Together Against Domestic Violence (Bellevue)
425.746.1940
lifewire.org

Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network
800.656.HOPE (4673)
rainn.org

State and federal reporting options

If you have concerns about whether the University is in compliance with Title IX or other relevant laws, you may make a complaint to state or federal enforcement agencies, including the following:

U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
Washington State Human Rights Commission

Reporting Options:

Reporting is an individual choice. Consider connecting with a confidential advocate to discuss your options.

Reporting to the University:

You have the right to report any behavior that feels inappropriate or unwelcome. The University will respond to your report whether you choose to file a report with the police or not.
The process the University follows to investigate and resolve complaints depends on who engaged in the behavior—a student, an employee, or a person unaffiliated with the University. Processes are designed to be prompt, fair, and impartial and to equitably protect the rights of individuals participating in them. If you choose to file a report, a confidential advocate can work with you throughout the reporting and investigation process.

Reporting to the police:

Behaviors described in this guide may also be a crime, and you may report them directly to the police. Police with jurisdiction over the location where the alleged crime occurred will investigate. If you have also chosen to report to the University, the University will make legally-allowed efforts to work cooperatively with the law enforcement agency but will not unduly delay its own investigation.

If you do report to the police, they may notify the University that a report has been made.

Confidential advocates can provide you with more information about reporting to the police. They can provide services regardless of where an incident took place.

Seeking a court-issued protective order:

The main purpose of a court-issued protective order is to keep the respondent or subject from contacting you or causing further physical harm. There are different types of protective orders available based on the situation and the people involved. Confidential advocates are available to provide more information and support in seeking a protective order.

Where to make a report depends on the person who engaged in the prohibited behavior.

The University Complaint Investigation & Resolution Office (UCIRO)
investigates complaints against University employees (faculty and other academic personnel, staff, and student employees)

206.616.2028
uciro@uw.edu
compliance.uw.edu/uciro

The Title IX Investigation Office investigates complaints against University students

206.616.5334
tixinv@uw.edu
uw.edu/compliance/tixio/

UW Human Resources investigates complaints against University staff (including student employees) and handles complaints against third parties who engage in prohibited behavior that affects the work environment of staff and student employees

Campus HR Operations & Services—Employee Relations
206.744.9223
employeerelations@uw.edu

UW Medicine Human Resources—Employee Relations, Harborview Medical Center
206.744.9220
employeerelations@uw.edu

UW Medicine Human Resources—Employee Relations, UW Medical Center
206.598.6116
employeerelations@uw.edu

UWPD
911 (emergencies)
206.685.UWPD (8973)
uwpolice@uw.edu

Seattle Police Department
911 (emergencies)
206.625.5011

Bothell Police Department
911 (emergencies)
425.486.1254

Tacoma Police Department
911 (emergencies)
253.798.4721

What to expect during the investigation process:

Contacting a reporting office: You may reach out to an office that receives reports and conducts investigations by phone or by email. A representative of that office will answer your questions and/or set up an initial meeting with an investigator. You will not be expected or asked to share more details than you are comfortable with during this initial conversation.

Timing considerations: Deciding if or when to report sexual harassment, sexual violence, or other sexual misconduct is a very personal decision. While there is no right or wrong time to make a report, timing may affect how the University is able to respond. For example, sanctioning options may be limited if the University receives a report too close to or after an accused student’s graduation, or if the University receives a report after an employee has left their positon at the University. If the person whose behavior is reported is a student, it may be more difficult to investigate during final exams or school breaks because witnesses are less available.

Meeting with an investigator: If you elect to meet with an investigator, you may be accompanied by a confidential advocate. The investigator will provide details of the investigation process, answer questions, and gather information about your experience. The investigator will also provide you with information about University policies which prohibit sexual assault, stalking, relationship or intimate partner violence, sexual harassment, and/or other sexual misconduct.

After the University investigator considers and reviews the information you provided, you will be informed of action(s) the University will take, including whether an investigation will be opened. The investigator will evaluate whether supportive or protective measures (such as limiting or eliminating your interaction with the person whose behavior is at issue) are appropriate while the investigation is pending.

Overview of the investigation process when the respondent is a student:

After meeting with you, the investigator provides official notice of the allegations to the respondent (i.e., the person who has been accused of misconduct).

The investigator thoroughly interviews the parties—you, the respondent, and any witnesses; the investigator also asks the parties and any witnesses to provide relevant evidence and information, including emails, texts, or social media communications.

The investigator assesses and analyzes the evidence and information provided by the parties and witnesses both during interviews and through documents.

In some cases, an investigator can make a decision at this point, and in some cases a full hearing will be initiated.

If the investigator can make a decision, and if they determine that the conduct code was violated, they may impose sanctions such as loss of privileges, an ongoing no-contact directive, and/or probation.

If a full hearing is initiated, a hearing officer will conduct the hearing and make a decision on whether the student conduct code was violated. If a violation is found, the hearing officer may impose any of the sanctions above. They may also impose suspension or dismissal.

Either the investigator or the hearing officer—depending on who makes the decision—will write an initial order. That order documents their findings and, if they determine the conduct code was violated, what sanctions will be imposed.

Once an initial order is issued, you have the option to request administrative review, which is sometimes referred to as an appeal. The respondent may also request a review.

You will receive detailed information about your rights and options throughout the investigation process. If you want additional information about the student conduct process before making a report to the Title IX Investigation Office, contact a confidential advocate or the Office of the Title IX Coordinator.

Overview of the investigation process when the subject is an employee:

After meeting with you, the investigator provides notice to the subject (i.e., the person accused of prohibited behavior) of the allegations.

The investigator thoroughly interviews the parties (you and the subject) and witnesses; the investigator also asks the parties and witnesses to provide relevant and available information, including documents, emails, texts, calendars, and other records.

The investigator assesses and analyzes the information and evidence provided both during interviews and through documents.

The investigator weighs the evidence and renders a decision. This may include:

A finding that a University policy was violated; or

A finding that the conduct at issue is not consistent with the University’s expectations for its employees, but there was insufficient evidence to conclude a University policy was violated; or

A finding that there was insufficient evidence to conclude a University policy was violated.

The investigator shares their findings with you and with the subject. They will also explain how and why those findings were reached.

If the investigator finds that a University policy was violated, the University will determine an appropriate corrective or disciplinary action.

The availability of specific corrective or disciplinary actions depends, in part, on the subject’s employment classification and role. Corrective or disciplinary action may range from coaching and education to changes in work assignment to dismissal.

Depending on the subject’s employment classification and role, there may be additional processes the University must follow before any corrective or disciplinary action is taken. For example, if the respondent is a faculty member there may be a hearing in which other faculty members weigh in on any disciplinary action.

You may not learn what kind of corrective or disciplinary action is ultimately taken, but you will be informed whether the investigator found a violation of University policy.

Privacy and University records:

The University seeks to protect the privacy of those who participate in investigations of sexual assault, stalking, relationship or intimate partner violence, sexual harassment, and/or other sexual misconduct in accordance with applicable state and federal laws. It balances this practice with the need to investigate and address prohibited behaviors, prevent their recurrence, and remedy their effects.

Some information relevant to investigations may be protected from disclosure by law, such as student records which are protected by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act or healthcare information which is protected by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.

In the case that information related to an investigation must be shared, it will be limited to those persons with a legitimate educational or business need to know. This might include the staff of the Office of the Title IX Coordinator, UW Human Resources, the Office of Academic Personnel, or the administrative head of a University department or unit.

The University must also report campus crime statistics, including those relevant to incidents of sexual violence, in compliance with its obligations under the Clery Act. Personally identifiable information is never disclosed in this context. If information is requested through a valid subpoena, court order, or warrant, the University may be required to disclose it.

How can I obtain the record of an investigation?

If you are a student who participated in an investigation, you may request records by emailing the Office of the University Registrar at ferpa@uw.edu. If you are an employee who participated in an investigation, you may request records through the University’s Office of Public Records and Open Meetings by emailing pubrec@uw.edu.

Additional information for University employees:

What should University employees do when they become aware of sexual misconduct?

With the exception of confidential advocates and healthcare providers (including mental health professionals), all other employees (i.e., faculty and other academic personnel, professional and classified staff, students employed by the University) who learn of sexual misconduct are advised to contact SafeCampus for guidance and support.

SafeCampus will ensure that all persons who have experienced harm related to sexual misconduct are provided information on how to obtain support and what options are available to them. SafeCampus—in collaboration with its campus partners—will also evaluate whether there is a risk to the safety of the community.

What should University employees do when they suspect a minor participating in University programs or activities is the victim of abuse or neglect?

Any University employee or volunteer who has reason to believe that a minor (i.e., any person under the age of 18) has experienced abuse or neglect must immediately report to law enforcement or the Department of Social and Health Services, per Executive Order 56. Employees should also notify SafeCampus of the suspected abuse or neglect.

This guide is published by the Office of the Title IX Coordinator for the purpose of providing information about rights, resources, and options to University students and employees. It is in compliance with the amendments to the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act made by the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013.

The University of Washington reserves the right to modify, delete, or edit the guide’s content without notice. The guide should not be construed as legal advice or a guarantee of particular outcomes.

For questions, contact
the Office of the Title IX Coordinator at
206.221.7932 or titleix@uw.edu.