Description

Mongolian Music, Dance, and Oral Narrative

Performing Diverse Identities

Carole Pegg

  • Published: 2001
  • Subject Listing: Anthropology
    Folklore
    Asian Studies
  • Bibliographic information: 380 pp., 20 photos, 14 line drawings, maps, appendix, notes, glossary, bibliog., index, LC 00-42308, 6” x 9”, includes CD
  • Territorial rights: world
  • Contents

This book celebrates the power of music, dance, and oral narrative to create identities by imaginatively connecting performers and audiences with ethnic and political groupings, global and sacred landscapes, histories and heroes, spirits and gods.

Three distinct cultural eras of Mongolian society are represented. Many Mongols are now performing publicly the diverse traditions of Old Mongolia that they practiced in private following the communist revolution of 1921; some are perpetuating the Soviet transformations of those traditions introduced prior to 1990; and yet others are dipping their curly-toed boots into new performance arts as they revel in musical encounters on the global stage. By highlighting the sheer variety of repertories, this book illustrates the rich diversity of Mongolia’s peoples and
performance arts.

An accompanying compact disc contains musical examples linked to the text.

Carole Pegg is ethnomusicology editor
for the New Grove Dictionary of Music
and Musicians and associate lecturer in social anthropology at the University of Cambridge, England. As an ethno-
musicologist and musician she has been working with nomadic groups in remote areas of Mongolia and Inner Mongolia, China, and with urban Mongols in both countries since 1987. She has also toured with Mongol musicians in England and Hong Kong.

“Dr. Pegg has made full use of what is truly a unique opportunity, by recording performances, interviewing ‘practitioners’ including even shamanesses (who were thought to have vanished from socialist society) and presenting the recovery of tradition against her analysis of the previous regime’s attempts to repudiate its existence.” –- Charles Bawden, Emeritus Professor of Mongolian, University of London
Contents
Acknowledgments
Notes on Transliteration, Transcription, and Abbreviations
Musical Examples on CD
1. Performances
Part I. Performing Ethnicity, History and Place
2. Connections
3. Vocal Repertories
4. Instruments and Dances
Part II. Embodying Spiritual Landscapes
5. Folk-Religious Practices
6. Shamanizing
7. Buddhist Performance Traditions
Part III. Creating Sociality, Time, and Space
8. Domestic Celebrations
9. Sport and Play
10. Herding and Hunting
Part IV. Transforming Political Identities
11. A Socialist National Identity
12. Disjunctures and Diversities
13. Postscript
Notes
Glossary
Interviews
Bibliography
Selected Discography
Selected Filmography
Index
Reviews

"A fascinating and in-depth study of a little known but increasingly important culture in all of its rich diversity." - Council on International Literatures

"This is the most comprehensive account of Mongolian music available. Carole Pegg has crafted a detailed account of the performance arts of Mongolia, focussing on the different ethnic groups who inhabit both the state proper and its bordering areas in China and Siberia. It is an ethnography in the old tradition, broad-ranging and all-encompassing. It is also based on an exhaustive bibliography of Mongolian, Russian, and European sources." - Asian Affairs

"An important introduction to the contemporary musical scene of Mongolia. Such a work is long overdue in ethnomusicology." - Asian Music

"Mongolian Music, Dance, and Oral Narrative brings together for the first timea detailed account of all performance traditions in the Republic of Mongolia, from the private and domestic through the religious and public to the professional and official...It is a rich collection of ethnographic data and key work." - Asian Folklore Studies