Description

The Battle for Butte

Mining and Politics on the Northern Frontier, 1864–1906

Michael P. Malone
with a new foreword by William L. Lang

  • $28.95s paperback (9780295986074) Add to Cart
  • hardcover not available
  • Published: 2006
  • Subject Listing: Western History
  • Bibliographic information: Orig. pub. 1981. 300 pp., illus., maps, bibliog., index, 6 x 9 in.
  • Published with: Center for the Study of the Pacific Northwest
  • Series: Emil and Kathleen Sick Lecture-Book Series in Western History and Biography
  • Contents

“Since it was first published in 1981, The Battle for Butte has remained the most sophisticated account of the events in Butte and the best treatment of the influence of copper in the political history of Montana.” - from the new Foreword

The late Michael P. Malone was president of Montana State University in Bozeman and author of C. Ben Ross and the New Deal in Idaho and coauthor, with Richard B. Roeder and William L. Lang, of Montana: A History of Two Centuries. William L. Lang is professor of history at Portland State University.
Contents
Contents

Foreword to the 2006 Edition by William L. Lang
Preface to the Original Edition

1. Gold Camp: The Rise and Fall of Butte City
2. Clark, Daly, and the Anaconda: 1872-84
3: The "Richest Hill on Earth"
4. Boom Town
5. Politics: The Clark-Daly Feud
6. Mr. Clark Goes to Washington
7. "Consolidation": The Amalgamated and the Independents
8. The Battle for Butte: 1901-6
9. Denouement: The Time of Transition

Epilogue: The Legacy
Notes
Selected Bibliography
Index
Reviews

“Malone’s superbly crafted narrative treats the political economy of Butte and Montana from the gold boom of the 1870s through the absorption of the copper independents by the Standard Oil financed Amalgamated Copper Company in the first decade of the twentieth century. . . . The Battle for Butte is fine history: rich in detail, full of finely drawn people, masterfully clear where the subject matter is most complex, constructed to preserve something of the tone and atmosphere of the age.” - American Historical Review