Description

No More Cherry Blossoms

Sisters Matsumoto and Other Plays

Philip Kan Gotanda

  • $20.00t paperback (9780295985015) Add to Cart
  • hardcover not available
  • Published: 2005
  • Subject Listing: Drama, Asian American Studies
  • Bibliographic information: 288 pp., 15 illus., 6 x 9 in.
  • Series: Naomi B. Pascal Editor's Endowment
  • Contents

In these four new plays, renowned playwright Philip Kan Gotanda explores the choices and challenges Japanese American women face. Although set in different decades of the twentieth century, the playsare all absolutely modern in the human struggles they depict.

"Sisters Matsumoto" tells of three Japanese American sisters who return to their family farm in Stockton, California, after living in an internment camp during World War II. "The Wind Cries Mary" is a gripping drama set in the tumultuous heyday of social upheaval that was San Francisco in 1968, when California's Asian American intellectuals were first finding a political voice. "Ballad of Yachiyo," set in 1919 in Hawai'i, is a moving story of a girl's coming to sexual maturity after being sent from home to work for an alcoholic artisan and his wife.
Philip Kan Gotanda is a widely produced playwright and respected independent filmmaker. The author of Fish Head Soup and Other Plays, he has received numerous honors and awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, four Rockefeller Playwriting Awards, three awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, and a TCG-PEW National Theater Arts Award. He lives in San Francisco.

"[Gotanda's] work is graceful, elegant, open-hearted, and economical. His intentions are serious, his ambitions are worthy, and his observations about human nature are particularly acute. These are surprising, beautiful plays, deserving of both readers and audiences."
-Tony Kushner
Contents
Foreword by Stephen H. Sumida
Preface
Sisters Matsumoto
The Wind Cries Mary
Ballad of Yachiyo
Under the Rainbow, a Play of Two One Acts
- Natalie Wood Is Dead
- White Manifesto and Other Perfumed Tales of Self-Entitlement, or, Got Rice?
Reviews