Description

Remembering Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes

The Legacy of Filipino American Labor Activism

Ron Chew

  • $17.95 paperback (9780295991900) Add to Cart
  • hardcover not available
  • Published: June 2012
  • Subject Listing: Labor History, Northwest History, American Ethnic Studies
  • Bibliographic information: 125 pp., 7 x 10 in.
  • Distributed for: Alaskero Foundation
  • Contents

Remembering Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes examines the lives of two slain cannery union reformers during the tumultuous Civil Rights Era of the 1970s. Author Ron Chew was a close friend of Gene and Silme, and his poignant prologue sets the stage for the story of their political awakening, the events that led to their tragic deaths, and the movement they nurtured. Through memories of family and friends, we learn about the men as second-generation Filipino Americans, as leaders, and as part of a generation striving to make America live up to its democratic ideals.

The book includes a history of Asian labor in the Alaska salmon-canneries written by Gene Viernes. He intended to publish this work to illuminate the contributions of cannery workers and the noble fight to create a union.

Remembering Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes provides rich insight into the roots of Asian American labor organizing and offers inspiration and wisdom for a new wave of activists.

Ron Chew is a writer and community organizer who has fought for social justice and more inclusive historical understanding. He is the former editor of the International Examiner and former executive director of the Wing Luke Museum. He now works as director of the International Community Health Services Foundation. He lives in Seattle, Washington.
Reviews

"Remembering Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes is a must read for Asian American and Labor Studies. Buy it, read it and recommend it to others." -Alonzo Soson, International Examiner, August 2012

"The book documents the astonishing level of discrimination practices in Alaska canneries into the 1980s. . . . this is a rich beginning." -Mike Wold, Real Change, August 2012