Top 5 Project: Student Issues, Recommendations, and Decisions

The issues and recommendations presented in this document are:

Issue 1:  Counting Non-Matriculated Students

This issue is to determine how to count non-matriculating students. 

Examples:   Examples of non-matriculated students are those students attending only summer quarter or State employees taking advantage of the tuition-exempt benefit.

Impact:   Errors in counting can affect many areas, such as funding, staffing, and facility requirements.

Underlying issue:   What is the business need and what approach will best serve the need of the Deans and Chancellors?

Recommendations:

Short-term:    Include a “non-matriculated” category under each school, college, or campus with the numbers for the non-matriculated students.

Mid-term:    NA

Long-term:    Continue with the short-term solution.

Deans’ and Chancellors’ Advisory Group Decision: The decision of the Deans’ and Chancellors’ Advisory Group is to count non-matriculated students.

Issue 2:  Counting On-Leave Students

This issue is how to count students who are on formal or informal leave.

Examples:   A student, who was enrolled in fall quarter, does not attend winter quarter and then returns for spring quarter. How should this student be counted during winter quarter?

Impact:  Errors in counting can affect many areas, such as funding, staffing, and facility requirements.

Underlying issue:  What is the business need and what approach will best serve the need of the Deans and Chancellors?

Recommendations:

Short-term:    Do not count on-leave students because they are not enrolled. This recommendation applies to students on either formal or informal leave.

Mid-term:    N/A

Long-term:   Count undergraduate and graduate students who are on leave.

Deans’ and Chancellors’ Advisory Group Decision: The decision of the Deans’ and Chancellors’ Advisory Group is to count on-leave students.

Issue 3:  Counting Students with Cross-Unit Majors

This issue is how to count students with cross-unit majors. This counting issue applies to undergraduates, graduate students, and students with inter-school or inter-college majors. Previously, cross-unit majors were known as interdisciplinary majors.

Examples:    An example of a cross-unit major is Bioengineering, which draws from the schools of Medicine and Engineering.

Impact:   Errors in counting can affect many areas, such as funding, staffing, and facility requirements.

Underlying issues:   Who gets to count a student; each school, college, and campus that sponsors the student? Count the student only once or multiple times?

Recommendations:

Short-term:   Count each student (once) in a “virtual” college. This means a student with a Bioengineering major will be counted in the cross-unit students category, but will not be included in the numbers for Engineering or Medicine

Mid-term:    NA

Long-term:   Count the students two ways:

  • Duplicated headcount by unit/major - Count the student in each unit (school, college, campus, or department) that sponsors the major.

  • Unduplicated, distributed headcount by unit/major - Allocate a percentage of the student to each unit (school, college, campus, or department) that sponsors the major, as agreed by all involved.

Deans’ and Chancellors’ Decision: The Deans’ and Chancellors’ Advisory Group supports the recommended short-term and long-term decisions.

Issue 4:  Counting Students in Informal, Dual-Degree Programs

This issue is how to count students who are in informal, dual-degree programs.

Example:   An example of an informal, dual-degree program is the concurrent degrees of Master of Public Administration (MPA) and Master of Library and Information Science.

Impact:   In the current data structure, there is not a category for “informal, dual-degree students” so the number of students in this category cannot be reported.

Underlying issues:   This issue is a policy question regarding whether there should be an informal category. Schools, colleges, and campuses choose this path because the process to set up formal, dual-degree programs is onerous and encourages the informal route.

Recommendations:   

Short-term:   Count students in each school, college, and campus associated with their majors; i.e., count students multiple times.

Mid-term:   NA

Long-term:   Change the process so it is easy to setup formal, dual-degree programs and stop using informal, dual-degree as a category for counting. Then, count students in formal, dual-degree programs as follows:

  • Duplicated headcount by unit/major - Count the student in each unit (school, college, campus, and department) that sponsors the major.

  • Unduplicated, distributed headcount by unit/major - Allocate an equal split to each school or college that sponsors one of the student’s majors. For example, if a student has a double major, each school, college, or campus would be allocated 50% of the student’s headcount.

Deans’ and Chancellors’ Advisory Group Decision: The Deans’ and Chancellors’ Advisory Group supports the recommended short-term and long-term decisions.

Issue 5:  Counting Students with an Undeclared Major or Who Intend to Apply for a Competitive Major

This issue is to determine how to count students who have not declared a major and students who intend to apply for a competitive major.

Examples:   Examples of competitive majors are Engineering and Nursing.

Impact:    One reason schools, colleges, and campuses need to know this information is to provide student advising services.

Underlying issue:    The underlying issue is providing visibility to the schools, colleges, and campuses regarding a student’s intended major.

Recommendations:   

Short-term:   Count students in their intended schools, colleges, and campuses. Currently, this practice is not consistently applied; for example, Engineering counts their intended majors and Nursing does not. Students, who do not indicate an intended major, are counted in Arts & Sciences.

Mid-term:   NA

Long-term:   When students fill out registration paperwork, they will be provided with a list of majors. At that time, they must choose an intended major. “Undeclared” will be one of the options. As is the case now, schools, colleges, and campuses will be able to count intended majors, but they will not be required to do so.

Deans’ and Chancellors’ Advisory Group Decision:    The Deans’ and Chancellors’ Advisory Group supports the recommended short-term and long-term decisions.

Issue 6:  Organization Structure for Tacoma and Bothell Campuses

The Tacoma and Bothell campuses are coded as branches and colleges. Neither campus has sub-colleges. If a student is enrolled with a major in Bothell or Tacoma, thatís where he or she is counted.

Examples:     A student majoring in Nursing at Bothell will have a code of BNurs. A student majoring in nursing at Tacoma will have a code of TNurs.

Impact:     Reporting options by campus are limited due to the way data is structured in the UW computer systems.

Underlying issue:    The setup of the UW computer systems needs to reflect the desired organizational structure for multiple campuses.

Recommendations:

Short-term:>   TBD

Mid-term:    TBD

Long-term:    TBD

Questions for Provost Wise: What is the future of the campuses? What is the business need in terms organizing the campus information?

Issue 7:  Fee-Based Students Who Take a State-Reported Course

This is a question about terminology:

  • Currently the terms state-reported and non-state-reported are used.

  • In the past, the terms state-funded and non-state-funded were used.

All students who register for at least one credit hour of a state-reported course are included in the numbers submitted to the State. Additionally, students may take a state-reported course and pay a fee.

Examples:     A flag is attached to each course registration that indicates whether or not it is state-reported.

Impact:     The terms must be consistent across UW computer systems, otherwise reporting will be confusing.

Underlying issue:     Using terminology consistently across the University.

Recommendations:

Short-term:   TBD

Mid-term:    TBD

Long-term:    TBD

Question for Provost Wise: What terminology should be used?



Short-term is defined as 1 – 3 years.

Mid-term is defined as 3 – 5 years.

Long-term is defined as five or more years.

Please email questions and comments to dmc-support@u.washington.edu