Schedule an Advising Appointment   Email
MOBILE

Suggested Courses

These are primarily 100- and 200-level courses that have few or no prerequisites. Many of them fulfill General Education requirements. Included are new and unique offerings, courses that provide a good introduction to a major or field of study, and courses that are great for challenging your ideas about the Areas of Knowledge.

EDUC 305: The Purpose of Public Schools in a Democracy

In the United States, “school” is the only compulsory institution in which we must all participate. American democracy, the idea that ‘the people’ can engage in responsible self-rule, is an on-going experiment. The original framers of American democracy believed that such a form of government required the active participation of an intelligent and prudent citizenry and almost from the start schools were viewed as central to this project for obvious reasons. As a result, public schools have been inextricably linked to the pursuit of democratic governance. Yet, Americans have struggled for centuries about how to organize schools and what those schools should teach. In recent years, state and federal education policies have narrowed the acceptable discourse of this field. Federal legislation like No Child Left Behind, federal grant competitions like Race to the Top, and pushes by corporate philanthropy toward standardization and market-base solutions have privileged certain viewpoints about the purpose of education. In this course, we will examine a wide variety of texts, participate in several kinds of discussions and conduct some research in order to better understand the relationship between schools and democracy, both historically and in contemporary society.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Lisa Murakami
August 12, 2014

AA 496: Aeronautics & Astronautics Undergraduate Seminar

This is an excellent course to introduce the Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering content to those that might have questions, about what someone does with this major. It can also help students at all levels decide if this is an area they wish to pursue.
Credits: 1
Recommended by Marlo Anderson
July 31, 2014

GEOG 205: Our Global Environment

with Christine Biermann
Geography has a rich heritage of investigating the relationships between the natural environment and people, and this course will examine current environmental phenomena from a geographic perspective. The issues we will explore vary in scale from global climate change to forest change of the Pacific Northwest, but for all issues there will be an emphasis on developing a thorough understanding of how earth systems work, and how these systems are linked to social and political economic processes. Students will learn the basic biogeophysical processes underlying environmental change, the human/social dynamics that also shape environments, the multi-scalar interactions between physical and social processes, and the broader geographic perspectives on environmental issues.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Rick Roth
July 31, 2014

PHG 200: Implications of Public Health Genomics for the Modern World

with Patricia Caorl Kuszler and Daniel Asmama Enquobahrie
Genomics, as defined by the National Human Genome Research Institute, "describes the study of all of a person's genes (the genome), including interactions of those genes with each other and with the person's environment." Recent advances in genomics give us a way to better understand how genetic and environmental factors affect human and population health. This course offers undergraduate students a starting place where they can put these factors into scientific, ethical, cultural, legal, and policy context, so that the goal of improving population health may be realized.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Ardith Feroglia
July 31, 2014

Gen Studies 391 D: Research Exposed!

with Jennifer Harris
Research Exposed offers undergraduates an opportunity to learn about current, exciting research in a wide variety of disciplines, including the process of discovery, how faculty come up with an idea for research, how inquiry is structured in the different disciplines, and how students can become involved in the knowledge-making process. Presentations by UW faculty focus on specific issues such as ethics and the culture of research. Students attend weekly, fifty-minute discussions and have the opportunity to ask the speaker questions following each presentation. This course may be repeated for credit (1 credit/quarter-3 quarters max); speakers and topics will vary.
Credits: 1
Recommended by Jennifer Harris
August 4, 2014

FISH/OCEAN/BIOL 250: Marine Biology

with Carolyn Friedman
This course introduces a diverse array of marine biology topics from ocean circulation to intertidal organisms to sustainable fisheries. It is appropriate for first quarter freshman and students with minimal science background as well as those with more advanced science knowledge. Marine Biology can be taken for 3 or 5 credits. The 5-credit version includes lectures plus labs and a field trip, and is a core course for the Marine Biology minor, which is the only minor on campus that can be declared before you declare a major! (Photo by Aaron Dufault)
Credits: 5
Recommended by Christen Foehring
July 31, 2014

ENV H 311: Introduction to Environmental Health

with Charles Treser
This course explores the relationship of people to their environment—how it affects their physical well being, and what they can do to protect and enhance their health and the quality of the environment. Students will be introduced to many different areas of environmental health study, from water quality and air pollution, to toxicology, epidemiology, and occupational safety. Recent group project topics have included: "Public Health Impacts of Climate Change in Puget Sound", "Genetically Modified Foods", "Nitrates in Ground Water", and "Factory Farming Health Impacts". This course is offered autumn and spring, has no prerequisites, and is open to students in all majors.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Trina Sterry
July 31, 2014

ENGL 200H: Black Modernism and the Politics of Sex

with Jason Morse
Course will interrogate the literary and cultural category of “Black Modernism,” during which we will question the term as a historical, generic, formal, and thematic descriptor. We will also examine the politics of sex in the gendered production of race in America that Black modernism engages. Authors may include Countee Cullen, W.E.B. DuBois, T.S. Eliot, Jessie Fauset, Ernest Hemingway, Langston Hughes, Nella Larsen, Claude McKay, Richard Bruce Nugent, Ann Petry, Gertrude Stein, Wallace Thurman, Jean Toomer, and Richard Wright and others.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kimberly Swayze
July 31, 2014

PHIL 160: Why Do We Believe in Quarks, Evolution, and Other Crazy Things? Perspectives on Science, Reason, and Reality

The course examines why we believe what science tells us. How does a theory go from being met with denial, to skepticism, to tentative acceptance, and finally to accepted "fact." Highly recommend the course to anyone, and especially to those future scientists. Optional W course.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Jim Scott
July 1, 2014

ENGL 342: African is the New Black: Contemporary American-African Fiction

with Professor Louis Chude-Sokei
In the social world of new African immigrants to the United States, the term “American-African” has emerged not only to distinguish these new immigrants from African-Americans but to signal an entire new ethnicity, culture and politics that can no longer be contained or described as simply “black.” This class engages fictions that straddle the African-American/American African divide as well as juggling those more familiar tensions of American/Immigrant and Black/White.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kimberly Swayze
July 31, 2014

ARCTIC 200: Indigenous Diplomatic & International Relations in the Arctic

with Nadine Fabbi
New course offered through the Jackson School of International Studies and the School of Oceanography. This course is also a part of the new Arctic Studies minor that was launched just the end of last year! With the rise of global warming, the Arctic has become a major topic in terms of international relations and environmentally. This course is appropriate for all students with or without prior knowledge of the topic. No prerequisites required.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Monick Keo
August 21, 2014

GEOG 277: Intro To Cities

with Kim England
A fast-paced, wide-ranging exploration of the evolution of American urbanization and the urban built environment. Considers a vast array of related topics: the roles of transportation, economic restructuring, politics, and urban planning in producing urban change; suburbanization and urban sprawl; inner-city gentrification; and how issues of class, race, and gender are embedded in the geographies of cities. Keywords: economic/social restructuring, housing, inequality, politics and planning, urban change.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Rick Roth
July 31, 2014

ENGL 314: A Global Africa: Contemporary Black Transatlantic Writing

with Professor Louis Chude-Sokei
As product of the enormous out-migration from the African continent of the last 20 or so years, there has been an explosion of literary production, rivaling even the explosion of work that came from Indian/South Asian writers a generation ago. Focusing on multiple countries, cultures and an incredible range of experiences, these works have been hailed and celebrated in Europe, England and America, and the writers are achieving an unprecedented level of international celebrity and cultural significance. This class will serve as an introduction to these writers, their issues and their works.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kimberly Swayze
July 31, 2014

ASTR 150: The Planets

with Dr. Toby Smith
Up-to-date and systematic "evolutionary" exploration of the planets in our solar system as compared to Earth. Less emphasis on the techniques of collecting data and more on the possible meanings of what has been found and their significance. Designed with the "non-science" student in mind.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kurt Xyst
July 3, 2014

ESS 101: Introduction to Geological Sciences

with Terry Swanson
Get some NW credits done with one of the most popular courses on campus. ESS 101 gives students a look at geological sciences and earth processes. This course has hands-on labs once a week, as well as field trips all over the Pacific Northwest during the weekends. This class has no prerequisites and is open to non-science majors!
Credits: 5
Recommended by Dana Hansen
August 1, 2014

ESRM 100: Introduction to Environmental Science

with R. Harrison
This course is appropriate for all students, freshmen through seniors. There are no prerequisites, just an interest in the environment. ESRM100 provides a comprehensive overview of environmental science. By using an "earth systems" approach, students recognize society and the environment as an interrelated system. Environmental issues are examined throughout the course and realistic solutions are investigated.
Credits: 5
Recommended by lisa nordlund
August 1, 2014

POL S 201: Introduction to Political Theory

with Prof. Christine Di Stefano
Do you want to be able to convincingly explain the deep ideas behind your political opinion? Theory is a way to get at the big ideas that shape politics. It creates the vocabulary and the critical/analytical skills that let us talk productively about topics like: justice, freedom, equality, conflict, revolution, international policy, and globalization. In this class you will read political theorists such as: Plato, Rousseau, Douglass, Goldman, Thoreau, and Malcolm X. No prerequisites.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Mark Weitzenkamp
August 13, 2014

GEN ST 197: Unlocking Disease Diagnosis: The Hidden Career

with Kara Hansen-Suchy, other Lab Medicine faculty & guest speakers
This interactive course introduces the undergraduate major and career of Medical Laboratory Science (formerly Medical Technology). There are no prerequisites and this course is for anyone who loves science, has an interest in medicine and has a desire to learn about another career option in healthcare. The adviser for the MLS major consistently hears from students that they REALLY wish they would have learned about this major sooner. So don't miss your opportunity to learn about the profession that provides doctors with roughly 70% of the information they need to diagnose their patients. Clinical lab results are a critical part of the healthcare world and Medical Laboratory Scientists are the professionals responsible for producing accurate lab results. Join us for a behind-the-scenes exploration of medicine and be ready to be introduced to a whole new world that you probably never knew existed!
Credits: 1
Recommended by Heather Eggleston
August 4, 2014

LING 400: Survey of Linguistic Method and Theory

This course examines major linguistic theories in phonetics, phonology, syntax, semantics; explores a wide range of linguistic fields. Students learn the basics of linguistic analysis and argumentation. Open to all: no prerequisites!
Credits: 5
Recommended by Katie Langr
July 24, 2014

CLAS 324: Greek and Roman Athletics

with Dr. Sarah Stroup
Compelling overview of the role played by athletic festivals and events in Ancient Greek and Roman culture. Traces the rise of different events and competitions from the practices of Mediterranean warfare, through the development of team sports and the Olympics, to the place of spectator sports (especially football) on college campuses. Unique and accessible way to start studying the Ancient Western world.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kurt Xyst
July 3, 2014

LING 100: Fundamentals of Grammar

with Clarissa Surek-Clark
This course introduces students to the basics of grammatical concepts and terminology, moving beyond the mundane world of prescriptive 'grammar rules.' Students will learn how to analyze grammatical structures in English, delving briefly into other languages. The curriculum is designed for students taking (or preparing to take) foreign languages as it provides a new perspective of language structure; students interested in linguistics are also encouraged to take the course.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Katie Langr
August 7, 2014

ENGL 197, 198, 199, 297, 298, 299: Interdisciplinary English Comp/Writing

These courses are linked with others across the curriculum, including Astronomy, Anthropology, Biology, Cinema Studies, English, Environmental Studies, Gender Studies, History, International Studies, Law Societies & Justice, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, and others! They allow you to take care of both an Area of Knowledge course (VLPA, I&S, or NW) along with Comp/Writing. The integrated teaching approach will encourage you to engage more fully with the curriculum and learn to write for a specific academic disciplines. There are no prerequisites and are suitable for students with any level of writing experience!
Credits: 5
July 31, 2014

HSERV 490: Using Economics to Solve Today’s Health Care Problems

with Norma B. Coe
Ever wonder what all the fuss is about in the health care debates? What is all of this controversy about the Affordable Care Act/ACA/Obamacare? Come ready to learn (and debate) what the field of economics has to say about the state of our health care system. This course is designed to introduce undergraduate students to the field of Health Economics, and the tools economists use to analyze current issues in health care. No Economics pre-requisites.
Credits: 4
Recommended by Susan Inman
July 14, 2014

POL S 202: Introduction to American Politics

with Prof. Rebecca Thorpe
Is there more to American politics than the partisan talking heads shown in the media? This class looks at the fundamental tension between American political commitments to democracy and to individual rights. It starts with the formation of the US Constitution, and then follows some of the most important issues up to today: states rights vs. federal powers, political parties, media’s effect, voting and elections, interest groups and money in elections, the military complex, and the politics of punishment. No prerequisites.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Mark Weitzenkamp
August 13, 2014

ESS 102: Space and Space Travel

with Erika Harnett
Take your education to the limits, of the solar system that is! ESS 102 is a great introduction to the upper limits of the Earth's atmosphere and what lies beyond. Compare the differences between Earth and the other planets in our solar system, as well as how to travel to them. Get to know the complex features of the sun, such as, how it gives us a source of energy and life, but also the deadly affects of solar radiation. This optional writing class can also count as I&S or NW credits. Plus, you get to build your very own water rocket!
Credits: 5
Recommended by Dana Hansen
August 4, 2014

HIST 110A & ENGL 198G: History of American Citizenship

with Professors John Findlay and Elizabeth Simmons-O'Neill
This is a great English Comp/Writing link offered by History and the Interdisciplinary Writing Program, both taught by senior faculty members. Neither course overlaps with any awarded AP/IB credit, are suitable for students from all levels, and may be of special interest to international students and those with an interest in immigration. HIST 110 examines how, when, and why different groups of people (e.g., white men, peoples of color, women, immigrants) became eligible for citizenship throughout American history. An independent research paper connects the student's family history (or some other family's history) to broader themes in U.S. history. English 198 is a 5-credit writing link to HSTAA 110. All writing assignments in English 198 F and G will be based on readings and assignments in HSTAA 110.
Credits: 10
Recommended by Kimberly Swayze
August 4, 2014

SLAV 425: Ways of Meaning: Universal and Culture Specific Aspects of Language

with Katarzyna Dziwirek
This course addresses how people talk to each other in different languages, to what extent the language we speak determines who we are, and the relationship between language and thought, culture, & national identity. We will discuss moral concepts, friendship and love, homeland, freedom, politeness, rudeness, and gender. No prerequisites.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Susanna Westen
July 10, 2014

CHID 222: Biofutures

The course explores how the rapid advances in biotechnology and bioinformatics are changing society, and forcing a rethinking of past practices. A great course for anyone, particularly students interested in the biological sciences and/or information technology.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Jim Scott
July 1, 2014

BCS 401: First Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian

with Dr. Bojan Belic
Dr. Belic is one of the best language teachers out there. Starting from day one he uses BCS (Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian) almost exclusively in class but makes it both understandable and entertaining! (Other words used by students to describe Dr. Belic are "dynamic, charismatic, passionate, committed, great sense of humor, able to teach difficult concepts with clear explanations.) If your goal is to come away speaking the language, have no fear, this is the class for you!
Credits: 5
Recommended by Shosh Westen
July 31, 2014

ENGL 357: Jewish American Literature and Culture

with Professor Joseph Butwin
In January 1938 Benny Goodman brought jazz to Carnegie Hall; later that summer the great Hank Greenberg hit 58 homeruns for the Detroit Tigers, just two behind Babe Ruth. In 1945 Bess Myerson, a Jewish girl from the Bronx, became Miss America. Saul Bellow’s Adventures of Augie March won the National Book Award in 1954; in 1953 Bellow’s translation from the Yiddish of Isaac Bashevis Singer’s “Gimpel the Fool” appeared in The Partisan Review. The Magic Barrel (short stories) by Bernard Malamud won the National Book Award in 1959; Philip Roth’s Goodbye Columbus (also stories) won the next year. In the 1970s Bellow (1976) and Singer (1978) would both win the Nobel Prize for Literature, and in the interval the musical Fiddler on the Roof (derived from the Yiddish stories of Sholom Aleichem in 1964) would begin an extraordinary run of 3000+ performances. It would appear that after the rigors of immigration American Jews had finally—in the metaphoric sense—“arrived” in the new world. The enormous success of several generations of Jewish writers, comedians, musical comedians and movie makers in the post-War period would seem to confirm that sense of cultural integration. But it is precisely the persistence of old—that is, old-world and immigrant—obsessions that would be the signature of this apparent success.
Credits: 6
Recommended by Kimberly Swayze
July 31, 2014

Gen Studies 391N: Undergraduate Research Intensive for Community College Transfer Students

with Janice DeCosmo
This course, designed for incoming transfer students, is an initial 2-day pre-autumn quarter workshop, held September 18 & 19 on the UW-Seattle campus, followed by weekly sessions during the quarter designed to help transfer students attain and excel in undergraduate research positions. The course will demystify the research process at UW and provide instruction in research-related skills and resources. All students receive one-on-one advising with URP staff and interact with peer researchers.
Credits: 2
Recommended by Jennifer Harris
August 4, 2014

AES 150: In-Justice for All: Intersection of Race, Ethnicity, Class & Gender in the U.S.

with Professor Connie So
This course takes a look at the transnational dimensions of American concepts and histories; how race, ethnicity, nationality, class and gender impact all Americans. The course will address relationships between the oppressors and the oppressed and the power of cultural agency and diversity in the U.S. as well as allow you to explore your own identity and ethnic history. No prerequisites.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Leslie Ikeda
July 22, 2014

EDUC 170: Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers

Elementary school mathematics is no longer considered just a collection of computational tools, but rather a rich body of intellectual content, focusing on understanding, reasoning, and communication. This course is designed to help you develop the skills that are needed for the mathematical demands of teaching. Note that this is a content course, not a methods course. This course will engage in key ideas in the elementary mathematics curriculum such as problem solving and quantitative reasoning, place value and algorithms for arithmetic, arithmetic operations, fractions, and number theory.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Lisa Murakami
August 12, 2014

HSERV 100: Personal and Public Health

Introduces the main components to a healthy lifestyle. Examines the role an individual needs to play in managing their wellness, and the role of society in creating a healthy environment.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Jim Scott
July 1, 2014

POL S 203: Introduction to International Relations

with Andrew Cockrell
What drives international relations and allows us to explain the modern world? International relations looks at the ideas behind interactions of nations, transnational organizations, and other political powers. It gives us tools to discuss some of the most contentious and difficult issues that affect the entire world: war, environmental policy, human rights, genocide, and world trade. These topics will be examined by learning the three major theories in international relations: realism, liberalism, and Marxism. No prerequisites.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Mark Weitzenkamp
August 13, 2014

POLSH 320: 1000 Years of Polish History & Culture

with Jakub Tyszkiewicz
Taught by a visiting Fulbright Lecturer from Poland, this course will cover the history of Poland from its beginning to the present: the medieval Polish Kingdom; growth and decline of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth; the phenomenon of noble democracy, religious tolerance; partitions, 19th century uprisings; Poland in the 20th century: regaining independence, interwar period, the Second World War and Soviet domination 1945-1989; and post-communist Poland.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Shosh Westen
July 31, 2014

ESRM 150: Wildlife in the Modern World

Think about all the squirrels you will see on campus what is it like for them in the "modern world?" This course is great of anyone, fun topic and relevant to all. Covers major wildlife conservation issues in North America. Some global issues are also treated. Examples of topics include the conservation of large predators, effects of toxic chemicals on wildlife, old-growth wildlife, conservation of marine wildlife, recovery of the bald eagle, and gray wolf.
Credits: 5
Recommended by lisa nordlund
August 1, 2014

ENGL 244A: Reading Drama: Comedy

with Professor Nicolai Popov
A terrific class with a terrific instructor, suitable for new/first year students through seniors. This seminar will explore the genre of comedy. Its main objectives are (1) to read closely several famous ancient and modern comedies; (2) to grasp the esthetics of major writers such as Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Molière, and Beckett; (3) to develop an overall sense of the traditions and cultural contexts of comedy, how comedy has changed over time, and which features have remained constant. Specific topics include: the origins of comedy; the forms and features of “high” and “low” comedy; the conventions and techniques of romantic and satirical comedy; types and functions of laughter; tragicomedy, travesty, and farce.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kimberly Swayze
July 31, 2014

ENGL 385: Embodied Modernism

with Professor Jessica Burstein
War, Fashion, Big Cities, and Sex: all four are embattled terrain, if not constitutive features, of modernity. This class gives a grounding in foundational literary and non-literary modernist texts, alongside an emphasis on the body as it appears in literature, sociology, and contemporary prose of the period; we will track changing depictions of sexuality with the emergence of the New Woman, Dorian Gray's relentless quest for new sensations, the "invention" of shell shock as a form of trauma, sartorial fashion, and urban experience. We will read novels, modern poetry, some manifestos, one popular best-seller of the 1920s, and close-read one great painting by the Impressionist Edouard Manet that mingles advertising, prostitution, sensual pleasure, the (proto-) little black dress, and urban spectacle.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kimberly Swayz
July 31, 2014

ENGL 479: Language Variation & Language Policy

with Professor Juan Guerra
This course fulfills the Diversity requirement and is taught by a terrific professor! Suitable for any student with an interest in language—no prerequisites. It surveys basic issues of language variation among speech communities of North American English and examines how language policy can affect access to education, the labor force, and political institutions.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kimberly Swayze
July 31, 2014

HSERV 490/590: War and Health

with Evan Kanter and Amy Hagopian
We explore the health consequences of war during the first half of the course (injury, infectious diseases, mental health, chronic disease, malnutrition, infrastructure) and the role of health professionals and others in preventing war during the second half (advocacy, measurement and application of epidemiological methods, promotion of social equity).
Credits: 4
Recommended by Susan Inman
July 14, 2014

HSERV 490 S: Social Networks and Health: Methods and Applications

with Miruna Petrescu-Prahova
People are interconnected, so their health is interconnected. We are all embedded in vast social networks of friends, family, co-workers and neighbors. Come learn how your place in a network might impact your life in ways you don't even know, and how understanding social networks can help you become a better public health researcher and practitioner.
Credits: 4
Recommended by Susan Inman
July 14, 2014

HSERV 490: A Practical Introduction To Ethnographic Methods In Public Health

with Stephen Bezruchka
How does one study cultures? Are there groups around UW that you are curious about and want to study? This course gets you learning ethnographic techniques to do just that. You will come away with new understanding of a culture and a grounding in how to apply those techniques in public health.
Credits: 4
Recommended by Susan Inman
July 14, 2014

COM 220: Introduction to Public Speaking

with Matt McGarrity
Other than writing, I can think of no more universally useful skill than the ability to speak clearly and well. Even if you never intend to speak to thousands of people, as politicians or CEO's may do, do you think you may someday have to clearly and effectively explain your thinking on a complicated topic to co-workers, patients, or clients? This course will help you to do that. And if you're afraid of public speaking, all the more reason to tackle that fear now! Get outside your comfort zone!
Credits: 5
Recommended by Megan McConnell
August 7, 2014

SOC Wf 200: Introduction to Social Welfare Practice

with Mary Lou Balassone, PhD
Introduction to the field of social work, including the theoretical concepts and institutional framework that guide practice. Overview of social work profession and social welfare system within which it operates. Lectures supplemented by exercises, films, guest lectures, and class discussions. Offered: A and Spring.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Linda Ruffer
July 31, 2014

ENGL 242F: 21st Century American Fiction and the Cultural Turn

with James (Ben) Wirth
This is a course primarily about reading prose fiction, but there are many parts to this that will interrogate our process of reading. The texts for this course are contemporary and place the analysis of culture as their primary literary goal. These range from post-9/11 paranoia and our place in history in Gibson's Pattern Recognition to the difficulties of finding a place in a diasporic and fantastical world in Diaz's The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. In reading these texts, we will grow not only as readers and thinkers, but as empathetic citizens of a world that is always expanding in its variance and difficulty.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kimberly Swayze
July 31, 2014

PSYCH 200: Comparative Animal Behavior

with Michael Beecher
This course is appropriate for all students, freshmen through seniors. There are no prerequisites. Topics include “...research methods and findings of comparative animal behavior, their importance to an understanding of human behavior; rationale for study of behavioral differences and similarities between animal species, and behavior viewed as part of adaptation of each species to its natural habitat.”
Credits: 5
Recommended by Carrie Perrin
July 9, 2014

POL S 204: Introduction to Comparative Politics

with Prof. James Long
Comparative politics is what people usually mean when they say they are interested in international politics. This class studies the development and growth of states. It looks at how different societies approach issues like economic growth, regime change, conflict, ethnic difference and electoral policy. This class will give its students a more complex and nuanced understanding of the constantly changing politics of the world. No prerequisites.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Mark Weitzenkamp
August 13, 2014

HSTCMP 311: Science in Civilization: Antiquity to 1600

Science did not fall from the sky fully formed. The current traditions, practices, and assumptions of scientists and those who do science emerged over time through trial and error, philosophical debate, and political maneuvering. This class introduces a story of the emergence of scientific thinking from the ancient world to just before the Scientific Revolution. Strongly recommended for science majors looking for an I&S class and anyone curious about why we do science the way we do.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kurt Xyst
July 3, 2014

GEOG 295: Intro to Migration

with Katharyne Mitchell
Very timely introductory course offers an evidence-based analysis of migration that ties current migration policies and practices to broader changes in the global economy. The class provides a link between general theories of migration and their specific manifestation in migration patterns worldwide. It explores a series of themes related to contemporary migration processes including transnationalism, humanitarianism, remittances, gender, asylum, and deportation.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Rick Roth
July 31, 2014

ESS 106: Living with Volcanoes

with Mike Harrell
Even if you don't realize it, you are seeing a volcano almost every day. Mt. Rainier towers over Western Washington, but just what sort of eruption style will it have? How did it form? When will it erupt again and what does that mean for our city? These are just some of the questions addressed in Living with Volcanoes. This class covers everything from prehistoric eruptions to features on the outer limits of our solar system. This class is open to all majors, and at just 3 credits is a perfect addition to any schedule.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Dana Hansen
August 4, 2014

LIT 228: The Water Crisis in Literature and Film

Just sounds like an interesting way to explore the growing concern over the availability of water, and how its scarcity might impact societies. Jointly offered with FRENCH 228; CHID 270A.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Jim Scott
July 1, 2014

RUSS 110: Introduction to Russian Culture and Civilization

with Barbara Henry
This introduction to Russian culture/civilization is taught by one of the department's popular and engaging professors.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Shosh Westen
July 31, 2014

Are you an academic adviser at the UW? Use the form below to suggest a course for this page.