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Suggested Courses

These are primarily 100- and 200-level introductory courses that satisfy General Education requirements and have few or no prerequisites. Included are new and unique offerings, courses that may provide a good intro to a major, and courses that are great for challenging your ideas about the Areas of Knowledge.

AES 150: In-Justice for All: Intersection of Race, Ethnicity, Class & Gender in the U.S.

with Professor Connie So
This course takes a look at the transnational dimensions of American concepts and histories; how race, ethnicity, nationality, class and gender impact all Americans. The course will address relationships between the oppressors and the oppressed and the power of cultural agency and diversity in the U.S. as well as allow you to explore your own identity and ethnic history. No prerequisites.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Leslie Ikeda
July 22, 2014

ASTR 150: The Planets

with Dr. Toby Smith
Up-to-date and systematic "evolutionary" exploration of the planets in our solar system as compared to Earth. Less emphasis on the techniques of collecting data and more on the possible meanings of what has been found and their significance. Designed with the "non-science" student in mind.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kurt Xyst
July 3, 2014

CHID 222: Biofutures

The course explores how the rapid advances in biotechnology and bioinformatics are changing society, and forcing a rethinking of past practices. A great course for anyone, particularly students interested in the biological sciences and/or information technology.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Jim Scott
July 1, 2014

CLAS 324: Greek and Roman Athletics

with Dr. Sarah Stroup
Compelling overview of the role played by athletic festivals and events in Ancient Greek and Roman culture. Traces the rise of different events and competitions from the practices of Mediterranean warfare, through the development of team sports and the Olympics, to the place of spectator sports (especially football) on college campuses. Unique and accessible way to start studying the Ancient Western world.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kurt Xyst
July 3, 2014

HSERV 100: Personal and Public Health

Introduces the main components to a healthy lifestyle. Examines the role an individual needs to play in managing their wellness, and the role of society in creating a healthy environment.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Jim Scott
July 1, 2014

HSERV 490 S: Social Networks and Health: Methods and Applications

with Miruna Petrescu-Prahova
People are interconnected, so their health is interconnected. We are all embedded in vast social networks of friends, family, co-workers and neighbors. Come learn how your place in a network might impact your life in ways you don't even know, and how understanding social networks can help you become a better public health researcher and practitioner.
Credits: 4
Recommended by Susan Inman
July 14, 2014

HSERV 490/590: War and Health

with Evan Kanter and Amy Hagopian
We explore the health consequences of war during the first half of the course (injury, infectious diseases, mental health, chronic disease, malnutrition, infrastructure) and the role of health professionals and others in preventing war during the second half (advocacy, measurement and application of epidemiological methods, promotion of social equity).
Credits: 4
Recommended by Susan Inman
July 14, 2014

HSERV 490: A Practical Introduction To Ethnographic Methods In Public Health

with Stephen Bezruchka
How does one study cultures? Are there groups around UW that you are curious about and want to study? This course gets you learning ethnographic techniques to do just that. You will come away with new understanding of a culture and a grounding in how to apply those techniques in public health.
Credits: 4
Recommended by Susan Inman
July 14, 2014

HSERV 490: Using Economics to Solve Today’s Health Care Problems

with Norma B. Coe
Ever wonder what all the fuss is about in the health care debates? What is all of this controversy about the Affordable Care Act/ACA/Obamacare? Come ready to learn (and debate) what the field of economics has to say about the state of our health care system. This course is designed to introduce undergraduate students to the field of Health Economics, and the tools economists use to analyze current issues in health care. No Economics pre-requisites.
Credits: 4
Recommended by Susan Inman
July 14, 2014

HSTCMP 311: Science in Civilization: Antiquity to 1600

Science did not fall from the sky fully formed. The current traditions, practices, and assumptions of scientists and those who do science emerged over time through trial and error, philosophical debate, and political maneuvering. This class introduces a story of the emergence of scientific thinking from the ancient world to just before the Scientific Revolution. Strongly recommended for science majors looking for an I&S class and anyone curious about why we do science the way we do.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kurt Xyst
July 3, 2014

LING 400: Survey of Linguistic Method and Theory

This course examines major linguistic theories in phonetics, phonology, syntax, semantics; explores a wide range of linguistic fields. Students learn the basics of linguistic analysis and argumentation. Open to all: no prerequisites!
Credits: 5
Recommended by Katie Langr
July 24, 2014

LIT 228: The Water Crisis in Literature and Film

Just sounds like an interesting way to explore the growing concern over the availability of water, and how its scarcity might impact societies. Jointly offered with FRENCH 228; CHID 270A.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Jim Scott
July 1, 2014

PHIL 160: Why Do We Believe in Quarks, Evolution, and Other Crazy Things? Perspectives on Science, Reason, and Reality

The course examines why we believe what science tells us. How does a theory go from being met with denial, to skepticism, to tentative acceptance, and finally to accepted "fact." Highly recommend the course to anyone, and especially to those future scientists. Optional W course.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Jim Scott
July 1, 2014

PSYCH 200: Comparative Animal Behavior

with Michael Beecher
This course is appropriate for all students, freshmen through seniors. There are no prerequisites. Topics include “...research methods and findings of comparative animal behavior, their importance to an understanding of human behavior; rationale for study of behavioral differences and similarities between animal species, and behavior viewed as part of adaptation of each species to its natural habitat.”
Credits: 5
Recommended by Carrie Perrin
July 9, 2014

SLAV 425: Ways of Meaning: Universal and Culture Specific Aspects of Language

with Katarzyna Dziwirek
This course addresses how people talk to each other in different languages, to what extent the language we speak determines who we are, and the relationship between language and thought, culture, & national identity. We will discuss moral concepts, friendship and love, homeland, freedom, politeness, rudeness, and gender. No prerequisites.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Susanna Westen
July 10, 2014

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