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Suggested Courses

These are primarily 100- and 200-level courses that have few or no prerequisites. Many of them fulfill General Education requirements. Included are new and unique offerings, courses that provide a good introduction to a major or field of study, and courses that are great for challenging your ideas about the Areas of Knowledge.

Quarter: Autumn, Spring

ESS 106: Living with Volcanoes

with Mike Harrell
Even if you don't realize it, you are seeing a volcano almost every day. Mt. Rainier towers over Western Washington, but just what sort of eruption style will it have? How did it form? When will it erupt again and what does that mean for our city? These are just some of the questions addressed in Living with Volcanoes. This class covers everything from prehistoric eruptions to features on the outer limits of our solar system. This class is open to all majors, and at just 3 credits is a perfect addition to any schedule.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Dana Hansen
August 4, 2014
Quarter: Spring

B H 201: Topics in Bioethics

with Erika Blacksher, Course Chair, lectures by various department faculty
This new hybrid course introduces freshmen and sophomores to major topics in clinical, research, and population health ethics as well as to methods of ethical analysis. Lectures and class activities begin with the events that prompted the birth of bioethics and move on to staple issues of informed consent, end-of-life care, resource allocation in health care, clinical and genomic research, and public health ethics. Students will have the opportunity to learn from and interact with core and affiliate bioethics faculty with a diverse range of scholarly expertise and to learn more about the bioethics minor.
Credits: 2
Recommended by Margaret Mitchell
November 14, 2014
Quarter: Spring

ENV H 490C: One Health - Human and Animal Health in a Changing Environment

with Dr. Peter Rabinowitz
Ebola, MERS, SARS and other new diseases from wild and domestic animals are emerging as a result of agriculture intensification, habitat loss, and climate change. Wildlife and domestic animals, like the “canary in the coalmine,” can provide early warning of environmental hazards. One Health is a systems concept connecting human, animal, and environmental health. Through a case based approach, the course will explore applications of this concept including emerging zoonotic infectious diseases, animals as sentinels of environmental hazards, health aspects of the human-animal bond, and the comparison of spontaneous diseases between humans and animals. prerequisite: BIOL 180
Credits: 3
Recommended by Trina Sterry
February 10, 2015
Quarter: Spring

GWSS 290A

with Dr. Regina Lee
This is a special topics offering on gender and fandom (a subculture of fans with a common interest) in online contexts. Explore the historical contexts of fandoms as communities built on affection and play, then explore the futures of fandom in terms of global access and transformation of social roles.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Sara Fleehart
February 10, 2015
Quarter: Spring

GEN ST 297G: Career Planning

with Tina Wang
In this class, freshmen and sophomores (1st & 2nd year students) will engage in self-exploration and exploration of career and academic options. Students will build self-awareness and appreciation for their strengths, skills, values, and interests, then apply this self-knowledge to make decisions when choosing a major and internships/jobs. Students will gain practical knowledge of how to research career options and hone professional networking skills (including online, social media, and traditional networking). Learn how to create effective resumes, cover letters and build interviewing skills and confidence.
Credits: 2
Recommended by Tina Wang
February 12, 2015
Quarter: Spring

GWSS 235

with Dr. Sasha Welland
Unique VLPA opportunity. This was a special topics course converted to a permanent offering jointly with Anthropology. Explores how feminist artists working in diverse locations and cultural traditions challenge, at the local and global level, artistic conventions and representations of gender, sexuality, race, class, and nationality.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Sara Fleehart
February 10, 2015
Quarter: Spring

Jewish Literature and Culture

with Barbara Henry
Interesting topic, dynamic instructor. Fiddlers on rooftops, bagels, levitating lovers, Cossack pogroms, and catastrophe. Go beyond the cliches of Jewish life in Russia & Poland to explore the beauty and riches of a 1000-year-old culture through its literature, film, music and history. No knowledge of Judaism or Jewish history required!
Credits: 5
Recommended by Shosh Westen
February 10, 2015
Quarter: Spring

NUTR 310: Nutrition and the Life Course

with Michelle Averill
This course explores nutrient needs from infancy through adolescence and adulthood, including the physiological basis of nutrient requirements and the genetic, social, and environmental influences on food choices and nutrition status. An evidence-based approach is used to assess the impact of nutrition across life stages and ways to improve population health by improving nutrition. This course is an elective for the Minor in Nutritional Sciences and fulfills NW credits. Prereq: NUTR 300.
Credits: 4
Recommended by Kristin Elko
February 9, 2015
Quarter: Spring

Delightful Horror: Gothic Literature from 1700-1900

with Anna Shajirat
ENGL 212-A: Delightful Horror: Gothic Literature from 1700-1900 (SLN 13776) Description: This course provides a survey of British literature from the eighteenth through the nineteenth centuries with a special emphasis on gothic literature. Before audiences went to the movies to delight in the terror of horror films, readers indulged similar impulses when they read gothic literature, a literary form filled with ghosts, monsters, creaking hallways, and mysterious moanings meant to instill fear in its readers. So, one of the questions we will ask throughout this course will be: why is it that we not only choose, but enjoy, being frightened? Further, why is it that this fearful enjoyment provided by the gothic rose to prominence in the eighteenth century, and remained one of the most popular literary forms through the nineteenth century (and beyond)? We will be reading gothic novels, poetry, and critical essays as a means of understanding not only the literature of this period, but also the social, economic, and political forces that shape this time of radical historical changes. Though our reading material comes from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, we will think together about how and why the fascination with fear introduced in the gothic is something we still feel today. This course fulfills the University’s W (writing) requirement, as well as the VPLA (visual, performing, and literary arts) requirement.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kimberly Swayze
February 6, 2015
Quarter: Spring

URBDP 200: Intro to Urbanization - Planning and Designing Alternative Futures

with Mark Purcell
This course introduces how cities work and explores alternative ways of planning and designing urban futures. It explores the economic, cultural, political, and social aspects of cities and how we might change them for the better. In URBDP 200, you will examine numerous case studies from the Global North and South. URBDP 200 is an introductory course to a minor in Urban Design and Planning or a major in Community, Environment, and Planning (CEP).
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kelly Hostetler
February 10, 2015
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer

LING 100: Fundamentals of Grammar

with Clarissa Surek-Clark
This course introduces students to the basics of grammatical concepts and terminology, moving beyond the mundane world of prescriptive 'grammar rules.' Students will learn how to analyze grammatical structures in English, delving briefly into other languages. The curriculum is designed for students taking (or preparing to take) foreign languages as it provides a new perspective of language structure; students interested in linguistics are also encouraged to take the course.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Katie Langr
August 7, 2014
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer

ESS 101: Intro to Geological Sciences

Geology is all around us! From the volcanic Mt. Rainier, to glacial deposits from millions of years ago, there is a ton of geology in our back yard. Intro to Geology is a great survey course that emphasizes the dynamic datuer of the interior and exterior of our planet, and understanding of how our planet is chaning. This is a lab based couse, with field trips almost every weekend. All majors welcome!
Credits: 5
Recommended by Dana Hansen
February 12, 2015
Quarter: Spring

URBDP 300: Intro to Urban Planning

with Himanshu Grover
Great, hands-on course on urban and environmental planning. This course covers the principles and theories of urban structure and institutions, concepts and logic of planning as a community process, and the evolution of planning ideas in response to changing social, economic, and environmental conditions within the American political framework. This course will get you out in the Seattle streets and thinking like planners! It is a core requirement for the Urban Design and Planning Minor and can count towards the Community, Environment, and Planning major.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kelly Hostetler
February 10, 2015
Quarter: Spring

B H 311: Ethical issues in modern medicine

with Professor Nancy Jecker
Note: This class combines in-class & online learning. The course has changed from B H 411 to B H 311 which opens it to freshmen and sophomores. Learning Goals: By the end of the course students will be able to: (1) analyze the ethical features of a clinical case; (2) formulate and defend an ethics recommendation on a case by appealing to ethical principles; (3) identify and defend an opposing ethical viewpoint and explain its ethical basis; (4) demonstrate an introductory level understanding of clinical ethics content related to caring for patients at the beginning and end of life; (5) use online tools to obtain basic information relevant to medical diagnoses; (6) use online tools to obtain basic bioethics information relevant to clinical cases; (7) practice professionalism when working with classmates on small and large group·assignments. Course Description: This course introduces students to bioethics as a field of scholarly inquiry. It accomplishes this primarily by working through specific ethical problems that arise in the clinical setting of medicine. By developing an appreciation of these problems, and of the methods of analysis used in their resolution, students learn about the methods and practice of bioethics. Throughout the course, students will be asked both to employ ethical analysis and argument in practical contexts, and to assess critically the assumptions underlying such analysis. Using a case-based approach, we address topics such as assisted reproductive technologies, prenatal genetic diagnosis, genetic enhancement, decisions to forego life-sustaining treatments, end of life care, and physician-assisted death. These issues will be explored through readings, films, lectures, discussions, online collaboration, and individual assignments. Invited speakers from the fields of medicine, nursing, ethics, public health, genetic counseling and other areas will present topics using illustrative cases.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Margaret Mitchell
February 11, 2015
Quarter: Spring

ARCH 150: Appreciation of Architecture

with Prof. Ann Huppert
Appreciation develops from understanding. Arch 150 offers an exploration of world history through the language of architecture and the built environment. We investigate the origins, materials, methods, and social significance of architecture from pre-history to the year 1400. Framed by chronology, the course will address architecture in terms of its form, siting, and cultural meaning, as well as the transfer of ideas across time and place. Architecture forms the setting for our daily lives. It includes places for rituals, living, working, and community-building. It is the house, street, city, temple, church, theater, city hall, market, park, and garden. This course addresses the creation, aesthetics, and use of these built forms and their landscapes, the components that make up what we describe as the built environment. A study of the built environment explores the relationship between humans and the natural world, and our most basic need for shelter, as well as our loftiest aspirations. In Arch 150, the first of two 3-credit courses, students will develop the skills to see, read, and interpret built environments as a means to understand human culture. This course uses lectures and images, augmented by readings, to introduce themes of historical inquiry. Through these themes we discover the diverse ways in which architecture has come to reveal the goals of society. Lectures will demonstrate methods for looking at and analyzing architectural forms. Close observation is fundamental for developing visual acuity. Students will be responsible for being able to identify the monuments, sites and features presented in class and readings, for understanding and applying descriptive terminology, and for engaging the themes of the course. These skills help to build architectural literacy and a knowledge of how built environments shape culture.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Nancy Dragun
February 24, 2015
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer

ESRM100 Environmental Science

with Harrison
Easy fit for most schedules and a good course.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Rob Harrison
January 20, 2015
Quarter: Spring

World Englishes (ENGL 372)

with Professor Nancy Bou-Ayash
ENGL 372 (SLN 13869) This course explores the ways major historical, sociopolitical, and economic developments have led to the spread of English as a world language and the subsequent emergence of new Englishes, refashioned existent local languages, and transformed communicative patterns and language relations in different parts of the world. Drawing on a wide range of artifacts (such as emails, social media interactions, speech transcripts, newspapers, hip hop lyrics, shop signs, advertisements, etc.), we will seek to explore the complexity of established and emerging Englishes in diverse locations in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. By pursuing comparative explorations of various Englishes, we will closely interrogate how these unique ways of using English shape and are shaped by locally specific influences of social, political, ideological and linguistic relations. Prereq: LING 200 or LING 400 or ENGL 370
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kimberly Swayze
February 6, 2015
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer

LING 200: Introduction to Linguistics

This course investigates language as the fundamental characteristic of the human species. It covers topics on the diversity and complexity of human languages, phonological and grammatical analysis, dimensions of language use, language acquisition, and historical language change. This course is a great option for students interested in language and/or linguistics, as well as anyone who would like to learn more about how and why they speak.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Katie Manlove
November 18, 2014
Quarter: Autumn, Spring

MSE 298: Introduction to Modern Materials

This 1-credit seminar is geared towards first and second year undergraduate students interested in learning more about Materials Science & Engineering. Learn about how materials are created and how they are changed for different purposes in society. Different application of materials discussed may include biomaterials, ceramics, composites, electrical, glass, metals, and polymers/plastics. Each week a different MSE faculty member will discuss their research with the class. Perfect seminar for rounding out your schedule!
Credits: 1
Recommended by Stanley Choi
February 4, 2015
Quarter: Spring

INTSCI 197: Science, Education, and Society

with Brian Buchwitz
Are you interested in science education? Would you like to: Deepen your understanding of how people learn science, in both formal and informal environments? Engage collaboratively in reflection, discussion, and practice of diverse strategies for teaching and learning science & promoting classroom equity? Examine societal perspectives on science, including controversies regarding science education? Integrated Sciences 197: Science, Education, and Society (2 credits) is a discussion-based course that is designed for students who are interested in exploring how science, education, and society interact with one another to influence how we teach and learn science. This course is open to undergraduates at all levels. "This class was extremely intellectually stimulating because it brought up questions about science and teaching that I had never considered before. It pushed me to research more about different topics and give a lot of effort to my work and contribute to group discussions." "I loved how the class built up to a final culminating project that encompassed the topics we learned about. We started the class learning about society things, then we added science to those ideas, then we added education, and then we combined all three ideas in our final project." -- INTSCI 197 Students INTSCI 197 will meet on Wednesdays, 3:00-4:20 p.m. If you have any questions, please feel free to email the instructor at: bjb@uw.edu.
Credits: 2
Recommended by Meghan Oxley
February 17, 2015
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring

URBDP 498: Planning as a Profession

with David Blum and Reema Shakra
Want to learn about urban planning, real estate, or community development? Want to network with professionals? Take this one credit class and hear from a professional each week! Past speakers have included: Dennis McLerran, Regional Administrator, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10; Marshall Foster, Deputy Director, City of Seattle Department of Planning and Development; Ellen Miller-Wolfe, Director of Economic Development, City of Kirkland; Mandi Roberts, Principal, OTAK, Inc., Kirkland; Jeremy Eknoian, Manager, Internal Operations – Real Estate Office, University of Washington.
Credits: 1
Recommended by Kelly Hostetler
November 13, 2014
Quarter: Spring

ENV H 205 Environmental Health in Media

with Rich Fenske and Gretchen Onstad
This class will examine environmental factors that affect human health through the use of popular film and visual media. In an active learning format, we will discuss questions such as: What real-world events prompted the making of the film? What scientific issues are central to the film? What has happened since the film was made? How did the film affect our society's thinking about environmental health hazards? In essence, if you found out your child was sick due to exposure to environmental contaminants, what would you do and who could you blame? Films include: Promised Land Erin Brockovich The Insider Contagion
Credits: 2
Recommended by Trina Sterry
January 30, 2015
Quarter: Spring

INTSCI 491/492: Introduction to Research/Reflections on Undergraduate Research

with Brian Buchwitz
Are you interested in undergraduate research in the biological, environmental, or physical sciences? Would you like to: Demystify research culture and develop research skills? Discuss research papers with a diverse community of undergraduate researchers? Develop a research proposal and increase your competitiveness for research scholarships and graduate & professional programs? Present your research in oral and written formats & improve your science communication skills? Integrated Sciences 491/492 (2 credits; Thursdays, 9-10:20 a.m.) is a discussion-based course that is designed to accompany undergraduate research experiences. Students must confirm a faculty research mentor before the start of the course. INTSCI 491 (Introduction to Research) and INTSCI 492 (Reflections on Research) meet together and share in-class activities. They are, however, supported by two distinct series of homework assignments. To determine which course would better complement your research experiences or to request an add code, please email the instructor at: bjb@uw.edu.
Credits: 2
Recommended by Meghan Oxley
February 17, 2015
Quarter: Spring

AIS 170: From Totem Poles to Tennis Shoes – Art and Culture on the Northwest Coast

with Dr. Kathryn Bunn-Marcuse
This course will be a survey of Native art as a cultural expression of the Indigenous people of the Northwest Coast. We will study material expressions (“art”) of the Native people of Puget Sound, British Columbia, and Southeast Alaska from ancient times to the present as well as exploring regional styles, with emphasis on aesthetics, cultural function, and factors of change as well as ceremonial and commercial art. Topics will include sovereignty, the impacts of historical and present-day colonialism, appropriation, and other issues of current concern. Each week we will look at a different cultural area and focus on particular themes within each area.
Recommended by Elissa Washuta
February 17, 2015
Quarter: Spring

Italian 127: Beginning Conversational Italian

with Sabrina Tatta
Italian 127 is a useful course for students who want a little taste of Italian and/or students who are going abroad in Summer or Fall on programs that do not involve a lot of target language instruction. This fun 2 credit Italian class prepares you for surviving in Italy and focuses on pronunciation basics and essential travel expressions. Learn greetings; read an Italian menu and order food; discuss sizes and prices with a salesperson. Your instructor is an Italian native who provides useful insights into the Italian mindset and customs. At the end of Spring quarter, you will feel more confident speaking Italian and interacting with the locals once you hit your Italian destination.
Credits: 2
Recommended by Sabrina Tatta
February 10, 2015
Quarter: Spring

CLAS 210 Greek and Roman Classics in English

with team-taught by Classics Faculty
Great introduction to the classical literatures of both Greece and Rome team-taught by classics faculty in a lecture-quiz format. Counts for VLPA.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Doug Machle
February 17, 2015
Quarter: Spring

ENVIR 240: The Urban Farm

with Elizabeth Wheat
A terrific opportunity to learn more about the UW Student Farm and to: become familiar with techniques of food production in urban settings and to gain a working knowledge of plant families, basic soil characteristics and methods of compost production. This course also includes a unique opportunity to visit a local working farm.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Ann Corboy
February 6, 2015
Quarter: Spring

OCEAN 200

with Dr. Nuwer
Learn why the ocean is so important and how to protect it.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Michelle Townsend
February 10, 2015
Quarter: Spring

ENV H 417 Case Studies in Children's Environmental Health Disparities

with Dr. Catherine Karr, MD, PhD, MS
Explore the intersection of health and environment for children around the world through real-life scenarios! This newly designed course introduces students to the ways in which children are disproportionately affected by environmental health hazards. Through a series of engaging case studies, students learn the core scientific concepts of children’s environmental health while exploring the social, cultural, regulatory, political, and economic factors that lead to children’s health disparities.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Trina Sterry
February 12, 2015
Quarter: Spring

ESRM 320: Marketing and Management from a Sustainability Perspective (online/no fee)

with D. PAUN
This is an introductory business course designed for non-business majors. It has NO prerequisites, offers NW and I&S, and is 5 credits. We cover the basics of marketing and human resource management with sustainability * (environmental and social responsibility) woven throughout the course. THIS IS AN ONLINE COURSE that meets in person only three times: 4:30-6:50 pm, on Tuesday, March 31 (course introduction), Tuesday, May 5 (midterm exam), and Tuesday June 2, (final exam), in 223 Anderson Hall. https://canvas.uw.edu/courses/965259/assignments/syllabus
Credits: 5
Recommended by Lisa Nordlund
February 12, 2015
Quarter: Spring

Asian American Poetry

with Jane Wong
ENGL 200 section E (SLN 13773) Asian American Poetry The term “Asian American” is often discussed as if it were both self-evident and immutably fixed. But Asian American writers do not always claim the label for themselves or for their work. Modern critics, too, have struggled to define conceptual similarities in Asian American literature, just as they have struggled to describe the limitations of the concept. Indeed, the question of authenticity or belonging is often raised: who counts? Who doesn’t? This course asks you to reconsider such static boundaries. This course will introduce you to a cross-section of Asian American poetry and multi-genre work in an attempt to engage the complex socio-historical experience of Asian Americans, up to the present day.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kimberly Swayze
February 6, 2015
Quarter: Spring

ESRM 101: Forests and Society

with K. VOGT
A great overview of ecosystems and other issues regarding forests. Survey course covering forest ecosystems of the world, history of forestry and forest conservation, how forest ecosystems function, wildlife in forests, environmental issues in forestry, forest management, economics and products, and new approaches to forest management.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Lisa Nordlund
February 12, 2015
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring

ENVIR 100

with Kristi Straus, Yen-Chu Weng
Environmental Studies offers interdisciplinary learning, integrating the broad range of social and natural science disciplines. This course examines contemporary environmental challenges and responses, including climate change, ocean acidification, biodiversity, social justice, and more. Students learn about the complexities involved in environmental issues and about our connections to these issues on multiple scales, from local to global. This course provides students with a dynamic and unique learning experience with an interdisciplinary teaching team.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Ann Corboy
February 6, 2015
Quarter: Spring

Valuing Nature: Literature and the Environment

with Professor Gary Handwerk
ENGL 365 A (SLN 13866) or C LIT 396 A (SLN 11800) Our focus for this course will be upon how literature deals with the environment, i.e., how literary texts represent environmental issues and why it matters that they be represented in this form. How, that is, does where we live and, even more importantly, how we imagine the place in which we live, affect who we are? How do our relationships to nature and our relationships with other people intersect? How do we come to value nature, and nature in relation to (or in competition with) human society, in specific ways? We will be considering a range of prose texts, including fictional narratives, non-fictional essays and journalism, primarily texts written or set in the Americas. Course goals include: 1) developing the analytical reading skills appropriate to different kinds of literary texts, 2) working on how to formulate and sustain critical arguments in writing, 3) learning how to uncover the supporting logic and stakes of specific attitudes toward the natural world, 4) understanding how environmental issues are linked to other social and cultural concerns, 5) seeing how those linkages are affected by particular historical and political conditions. The course will contain a significant writing component, both regular informal writing assignments and several medium-length analytical papers; it can count for W-credit. Texts include Defoe, Robinson Crusoe; Faulkner, Go Down, Moses; McPhee, Encounters with the Archdruid; Abbey, Desert Solitaire; Appleman, Darwin; Butler, Wild Seed; Barry Lopez Arctic Dreams; and a reading packet.
Credits: 6
Recommended by Kimberly Swayze
February 6, 2015
Quarter: Spring

Margins and Centers: Who's In, Who's Out, and Why it Matters (ENGL 242 section F)

with Professor Anu Taranath
ENGL 242 section F (SLN 13785) This class focuses on literature that will help us think about how people categorize each other on the basis of various social and biological features, including gender, race, ethnicity, language, citizenship status, sexuality, and ability. In all societies around the globe, some are part of the Center--often with status and the power to make and enforce rules--and some are relegated to the Margin--often with less power and subject to the rules and regulations that the Center dictates. These dynamics play out in terms of international relations between countries on the world stage, as well as in our own seemingly smaller lives with family and friends. What's going on? Why does this keep happening? And what does this have to do with you and me? The novels we read this term will help us imagine people who might seem different from us, and provoke us to ask larger questions about identity, power, privilege, society and the role of culture in our lives.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kimberly Swayze
February 6, 2015
Quarter: Spring

Language and Social Policy

with Bojan Belic
ENGL 478 A (SLN 13881) or CHID 498 C (12277) or LING 480 C (16074) or SLAV 370 A (18983) LANGUAGE AND SOCIAL POLICY (I&S or VLPA, DIV) This course examines concepts such as language death and language birth, the relationship between dialect and language. Notions of language politics, language standardization, and language codification are considered. No Prior knowledge of the language(s) necessary since most readings are general and students may work on language(s) of their choice.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kimberly Swayze
February 6, 2015
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring

ESS 102: Space and Space Travel

with Erika Harnett
Take your education to the limits, of the solar system that is! ESS 102 is a great introduction to the upper limits of the Earth's atmosphere and what lies beyond. Compare the differences between Earth and the other planets in our solar system, as well as how to travel to them. Get to know the complex features of the sun, such as, how it gives us a source of energy and life, but also the deadly affects of solar radiation. This optional writing class can also count as I&S or NW credits. Plus, you get to build your very own water rocket!
Credits: 5
Recommended by Dana Hansen
August 4, 2014
Quarter: Spring

Physics 248 Selected Topics: Applications of Quantum Mechanics

with J. Rothberg
This course will cover applications of basic Quantum Mechanics that are of current importance in biology and medicine as well as in energy production. The course should also be of interest to students considering scientific journalism. The applications will include Quantum Cryptography, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Atomic Microscopes, Positron Tomography, Proton Therapy, Nuclear fission and fusion. Prerequisites are two quarters of introductory physics; basic quantum physics and the behavior of elementary particles will be introduced.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Joseph Rothberg
February 11, 2015
Quarter: Spring

Outbreak!

with Janet Baseman
EPI 201 Outbreak Investigation & Response is an exciting new offering from the School of Public Health. In this course, you'll learn how disease outbreaks like Ebola start, spread, and are detected and investigated. Plus it satisfies an admission requirement for the Public Health Major!
Credits: 4
Recommended by Susan Inman
February 10, 2015

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