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Of Historical Interest

Previous General Education Requirements

This section includes details of early Arts and Sciences general education requirements and who is eligible for each one. It is of mainly academic and historical interest. Most Arts and Sciences advisers will never need to apply any of the requirements described below except the green list pre-1985 proficiency requirement, which is described in detail in a separate AIF, Pre-1985 General Education and Basic Skills Requirements.

The single date advisers need commit to memory is 1985. Virtually all A&S students who entered college before autumn 1985 use the current Areas of Knowledge requirement and the pre-1985 proficiency requirement. Virtually all A&S students who entered college in autumn 1985 or later use the current general education and skills requirements.

A summary of previous Arts and Sciences requirements, and what students are eligible for each set of requirements, is the the chart below. This is followed by a detailed description of each set of requirements and some information about how each evolved. The last section of this AIF is devoted to a discussion of how to determine the student's date of college entry when this may not be clear.

Other colleges

In some UW schools and colleges, students who started college before 1994 (and students who transferred to the UW before 1996) are eligible for the pre-1994 general education requirements of that school or college. In many instances, however, the previous requirements of colleges meet or exceed the current requirements, and there is no advantage to claiming eligibility for earlier requirements. Most schools and colleges expect students to meet their current general education requirements. A student requesting an exception should petition the college. The Undergraduate Advising Office has UW bulletins dating back to the early 1930s and can assist advisers from other colleges who wish to research previous requirements.

University general education requirements

Before autumn 1985 there was no University-wide general education requirement; each school and college set its own requirements. For University requirements from 1985 on, see the AIFs on current requirements.

Summary

It is not uncommon for a student to start at the UW when one set of general education requirements is in effect and finish under a different set of requirements. The governing principle is that students are allowed to use the most liberal set of requirements available between the time the student entered college and the time the student graduates. Students are not allowed to elect a set of requirements that were retired before the student started college.

Basic skills

The current basic skills requirement (writing, math, and foreign language) was adopted in 1985 and is more rigorous than the previous requirement. Students who entered college before autumn 1985 are allowed to use the green-list, pre-1985 requirement, called "old proficiency," and to combine it with the current Areas of Knowledge requirement (or, if eligible, with the white list). Detailed information about the old proficiency requirement is in the AIF Pre-1985 General Education and Basic Skills Requirements.

General education

Because the current general education requirement (Areas of Knowledge) is more liberal than most earlier requirements, almost all students benefit from using the current requirement. This is certainly true for all students who started college in autumn 1980 or later. Students who are eligible for the pre-1980 white list and the even earlier 10-20-30 distribution plan may be better off following old requirements.

Electing old requirements

Students MAY choose to follow the requirement that was in effect when they started college, but those who choose to do so must follow the earlier requirement in its entirety, including the basic skills as well as the general education requirement.

The chart is followed by detailed descriptions of previous Arts and Sciences requirements. More information is available in a set of UW Bulletins ranging back to the 1930s, at the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Student started college ...RequirementRecommended substitutionComments
autumn 1994 or latercurrent requirements  
autumn 1985 through summer 1994blue list
  • current English/W/QSR/foreign lang
  • current Areas of Knowledge
basic skills requirements same; AoK more liberal than blue list
autumn 1980 through summer 1985green list
  • old (green) proficiency
  • current Areas of Knowledge
old (green) proficiency more liberal than current requirement; AoK much more liberal than green list
autumn 1969 through summer 1980 (see*footnote)white list
  • old (green) proficiency
  • current Areas of Knowledge plus
old (green) proficiency more liberal than current requirement; eligible students may count some additional white-list courses toward VLPA
autumn 1962 through summer 1969no nickname, but this was the period when two college years of foreign language was required
  • old (green) proficiency
  • current Areas of Knowledge plus
old (green) proficiency more liberal than current requirement and the 62-69 requirement; eligible students may count some additional white-list courses toward VLPA
pre autumn 196210-20-30
  • old (green) proficiency
  • current Areas of Knowledge plus
  • OR 10-20-30 AND its skills requirement
student may be better off using the entire 10-20-30 requirement, but MAY use old proficiency plus AoK; eligible students may count some additional white-list courses toward VLPA

* Actually, it's a little more complicated. Students eligible for the white list are those who entered the UW as freshmen through summer 1980, or as transfer students through summer 1982. The date the student entered the UW, not the date the student started college, is the determining factor.

Pre-1962

Pre-1936

Before 1936, the College of Liberal Arts had the following Specific Requirements:

  • Composition 1 and 2 (10 credits)
  • Psychology 1 (5 credits)
  • Philosophy 1, 2, 3, or 5 (5 credits)
  • Foreign language - two high school years of Latin, Greek, French, German, Spanish, Scandinavian, or Italian, OR 20 college credits in one of these seven languages plus a passing score on a reading test
10-20-30

In 1936, the following Required Courses and Group Requirements were adopted. A few majors had "prescribed departmental curricula" which replaced the Group Requirements. These general education requirements remained in effect until autumn 1962.

  • Required Courses
    • English 101, 102, 103 (9 credits)
    • Physical Education 110 (women) or 175 (men) (2 credits), plus six quarters of physical education activity
    • All male students entering directly from high school must complete six quarters of military training.
  • Group Requirements
    • 60 credits from Group I (Humanities), II (Social Sciences), and III (Natural Sciences)
    • At least 10 credits from one group, 20 credits from a second group, and 30 credits from the third group
    • Individual courses were not listed; each Group consisted of departments in the College of Arts and Sciences. Thus, virtually all A&S courses counted toward Group Requirements.
    • Courses used to satisfy the Required Courses could not be used.
    • Courses in the student's major could be used.

1962-1969

In 1962 both the basic skills and breadth requirements were revised. This period was the only time in the College of Arts and Sciences when two college years of foreign language were required of all students.

  • Basic Proficiencies
    • English 101, 102, 103, or exemption by WPCT or AP score
    • Math 101 or Philosophy 120, or placement into trigonometry or college algebra
    • Completion of the sixth college quarter of a foreign language, or placement into the seventh quarter
  • Distribution Requirement
    • 20 credits each of Humanities, Social Sciences, and Natural Sciences, plus an additional 20 credits. No more than 30 credits could count toward each group.
    • The lists included almost all courses in the College of Arts and Sciences.
    • Up to 15 credits in the major department could count.
    • Courses satisfying the Basic Proficiencies could not also count toward Distribution.

White list

In autumn 1969 both the basic skills and general education requirements were changed. The distribution requirement was dropped from 80 credits to 60. The most substantial changes, however, were in the basic skills requirement. This 1969 proficiency requirement is what we now refer to as "old proficiency," and it is the basic skills requirement now followed by any student who started college before autumn 1985. Because we now see many more students eligible for the next general education plan, the green list, than students eligible for the white list, we have come to associate this basic skills plan (old proficiency) with the green list, but it actually originated with the white list.

The white list is more liberal than even the current Areas of Knowledge list in that it include English composition courses and all foreign language courses, including first-year courses and conversation courses. Students who are eligible for the white list AND who took these courses before autumn 1994 are allowed to count the courses toward VLPA. The College no longer maintains the white list, but many courses that counted toward the white list but do not count toward Areas of Knowledge are listed in the General Education Course Archives.

  • Proficiency requirement
    • 15 credits from a list including English composition, foreign language, and math.
    • Exemptions for students with a specified high school background or at least 85 transfer credits or an academic transfer associate degree from a Washinton community college.
    • For details see Pre-1985 General Education and Basic Skills Requirements.
  • Distribution requirement
    • 20 credits each Humanities, Social Sciences, and Natural Sciences
    • Almost all courses in the College of Arts and Sciences are on the "college lists." Also provided were "special lists" of introductory and fundamental courses. Special-list courses were not required; they were recommendations to help students with program planning.
    • No courses from the student's major department counted.
    • No courses used to satisfy the proficiency requirement counted.

Green list

A major revision of the distribution requirement was started in 1978. For a few years parts of the requirement were changed each year, resulting in a bewildering array of eligibility tables and flow charts to help advisers determine each student's requirements. Since the distribution lists became progressively more limited, each student wished to follow the earliest set of requirements for which he was eligible.

Although it was a challenge to follow the requirements at the time, when the revision of the basic skills and general education requirements was completed all the intermediate plans were discarded and all students were transferred to what we now refer to as the "pre-85" distribution requirement, or the "green list," which was the distribution plan finally achieved at the end of all the revisions that occurred during this period.

Throughout this period the 15-credit proficiency requirement described immediately above was maintained. Only the distribution requirement changed.

Distribution list revisions

The revisions actually started in 1978, although the changes made in 1978 and 1979 were eventually rolled back so that they applied only to students who started college in 1980 or later.

In 1978 a faculty committee was charged with the task of reducing the distribution lists. Ever since the institution of a breadth requirement in 1936, the lists of approved courses had included almost all courses taught in the College of Arts and Sciences. The committee was to limit the lists to courses with a strong general education component. For example, the revised social science list included, among other courses, six anthropology, four economics, five geography, and seven political science courses.

In autumn 1978 the revised social science list was instituted. Freshmen entering in autumn 1978 or later, and transfer students entering in autumn 1980 or later, were required to use the short social science list, but used the long humanities and natural science lists.

In autumn 1979 the revised natural science list was instituted. This list was not as restrictive as the social science list. It included, for example, 9 biology, 11 math, 23 chemistry, and 26 physics courses. Freshmen entering in autumn 1979 or later, and transfer students entering in autumn 1981 or later, were required to use the short social science and natural science lists, but continued to use the long humanities list.

In autumn 1980 the revised humanities list was instituted. By this time the standards had relaxed even more; this list included 23 art history, 21 music, and 66 English courses.

In autumn 1981 the intermediate lists were removed, the lists that were combinations of long and revised lists. Freshmen who entered in autumn 1980 or later, and transfer students entering in autumn 1982 or later, were required to use the shortened lists, which by now was referred to as the "green list," from the color of the 1980 Bachelor's Degree Planbook. Students who entered before those dates were eligible for the long list, now referred to as the "white list." This meant that quite a few students (those freshmen who entered in 1978 and 1979) were moved from the short lists back to the long lists.

In summary ...

All students who started college before autumn 1985 are eligible for the 1969 "old proficiency" list. Students who entered the UW as freshmen before 1980, and as transfer students before 1982, are eligible for the long "white" distribution lists. Students who entered the UW as freshmen after 1980, and as transfer students after 1982, were required to use the short "green" distribution list. Any of these students who graduate after 1994 are eligible to use instead the much more liberal Areas of Knowledge list.

The Humanities Grid

From 1978 through 1981 there was a faculty initiative called the Humanities Grid. This grouped humanities distribution courses by chronological period, geographical region, and type of expression, allowing interested students to structure the selection of their humanities distribution courses rather than choosing a random collection of subjects. A number of new Humanities course offerings were designed specifically to occupy cells of the grid.

Below is a sample humanities grid from the 1978 Bachelor's Degree Planbook.

 AncientMedieval/RenaissanceModernAsianAfrica/Oceania/Americas
LiteratureCLAS 210
NE 220
HUM 212   
IdeasHUM 231 HUM 233  
ReligionRELIG 201  RELIG 202 
Visual/Environmental ArtsART H 201ART H 202ART H 203ART H 204ART H 205
Interpretative/Performing ArtsHUM 291HUM 291 HUM 294 

Blue list

There were many changes in the period 1985-1994. During this time the basic skills requirement was revised into the current requirement of English composition, W courses, Q/SR, and foreign language. The distribution requirement during this period was significantly different than the requirements that came before and after. The lists were yet again revised to include many more courses than the green list, and requirements of subcategories and linked sets were added.

Basic skills

The revision of the basic skills requirement actually began in 1983 with the addition of a 10-credit W course requirement. This implementation was eventually rolled back and students who entered before autumn 1985 were not required to complete the W-course requirement.

The revised basic skills requirement took effect in autumn 1985. This requirement, with minor revisions, has remained in effect since autumn 1985.

  • English composition, 5 credits
  • W courses, 10 credits
  • Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning (Q/SR), 5 credits
  • Foreign language, proficiency through the third college quarter

A minimum grade of 2.0 was required in English composition, the Q/SR course, and the third quarter of foreign language. The minimum 2.0 requirement was removed from the Q/SR in 1994, and the change was retroactive.

Distribution

The distribution requirement was extensively revised in 1983. The 1983 plan was referred to as the "yellow list:" old proficiency, W courses, and the new distribution plan. In 1985 the new proficiency described above was added and this 1985 collection of requirements was referred to as the "blue list:" new proficiency and new distribution. In 1994, when the requirements were revised yet again, the yellow list was eliminated and those students were rolled back to the green list: old proficiency and old distribution. It was at this point that 1985 became the major point of division that still remains: pre-1985 students do old proficiency (foreign language not required) and post-1985 students do new proficiency (foreign language required).

The 1985 distribution requirement, the blue list, was the most complex yet.

  • Group I - Humanities: 20 credits, including 5 credits in Language and Literature and 5 credits in Fine Arts
  • Group II - Social Sciences: 20 credits, including 5 credits in Social Sciences and 5 credits in History, Philosophy, and Civilization
  • Group III - Natural Sciences: 20 credits
  • Two linked sets required, one in natural sciences and the other in humanities, social sciences, or humanities/social sciences combined (crossover)

The distribution lists were somewhat expanded and included more courses than the previous "green list." The lists were still more restrictive, however, than the lists that preceded the green list and more restrictive than the current Areas of Knowledge list.

Blue-list students were allowed to complete as few as 15 credits in the Group in which the student's major fell, as long as the student presented additional credits in one or both of the other Groups so that the student still completed at least 60 total distribution credits. In departments that had courses in more than one Group, the student was allowed to choose the Group in which s/he would complete fewer credits, as long as the student completed at least one course in the major in that Group.

The yellow list required only one linked set, in natural sciences. The humanities/social science/crossover linked set was added in 1985, with the blue list. The linked sets were determined by the faculty and approved lists were provided along with the distribution lists. Linked sets were two or three courses. Examples: OCEAN 101 and FISH 101 (natural sciences), ART H 201 and 202 (humanities), ECON 200 and 201 (social sciences), ART H 202 and HST 112 (crossover).

The College Studies Alternative

College Studies was an alternative general education plan first offered in 1988 and available through 1997. Instead of 20 credits in each distribution area, students could complete a coordinated 15-credit sequence. For information, see The College Studies Program.

Current requirements

The current basic skills requirements (English composition, additional writing, Q/SR, and foreign language) were adopted in 1985, as described above. All Arts and Sciences students who started college in autumn 1985 or later must follow the current basic skills requirements described in the AIF. See General Education Requirements.

The current general education requirement (Areas of Knowledge) was adopted in 1994. All Arts and Sciences students who started college in autumn 1994 or later must follow the current Areas of Knowledge requirement described in the AIF. See General Education Requirements.

Determining the quarter of entry

Eligibility for distribution plans is determined by either the quarter the student first entered college or, for the white list, the quarter the student first entered the UW.

Quarter of UW entry

The quarter of entry can be determined easily from the student number. The first two digits of the student number are the year the student entered the UW, and the third digit refers to the quarter of entry: summer quarter is 1, autumn is 2 or 3, winter is 4, and spring is 5. A student number of 9133265, therefore, indicates UW entry in autumn quarter of 1991. Student numbers are assigned to nonmatriculated and credit-extension students, and are used to determine the date of UW enrollment for these students as well. An Arts and Sciences student who enrolls at the UW, then attends another college, and then returns to the UW, is assigned eligibility for requirements by the date of his/her first enrollment at the UW.

Quarter of college entry

This is the quarter in which the student first enrolled in a course at a college-level institution -- even if the course was not transferable to the UW, or even if the course was never completed.

THE FOLLOWING CONSTITUTE COLLEGE ENTRY.
Note: "Any course" means any credit or non-credit course.

  1. Enrolling in any course, including courses evaluated by the UW as vocational/technical, at an accredited college
  2. Enrolling in any course at a non-accredited college (e.g., a Bible college)
  3. Enrolling in any course as a nonmatriculated student
  4. Enrolling in a college-level course while still attending high school (even if the course was taught at the high school, as long as it appears on a college transcript)
  5. Enrolling in any college-level extension or correspondence courses, including MATH 098
  6. Completing a high-school course for which the student receives college credit, if that course was taught at the high school rather than at the college

ENROLLING IN OR EVEN COMPLETING THE FOLLOWING TYPES OF COURSES DOES NOT CONSTITUTE COLLEGE ENTRY:

  1. High school Advanced Placement courses, even if college credit is granted by the UW. (The credit is actually earned at the time of admission to UW, not before.)
  2. A course taken at a community college for high-school credit rather than college credit, even if others received college credit for the same course
  3. Non-credit UW Extension courses, except MATH 098
  4. UW Experimental College courses, or any similar general-interest courses offered to the community at large
  5. Non-credit vocational programs offered by proprietary schools, such as "beauty college," computer training, or real-estate classes.

In most cases, students transfer in credits and it is clear from the transfer evaluation when the student started college. When students have only non-credit courses, a good general rule is that they started college whenever they thought they did. For example, UW nonmatriculated students think of themselves as being in college, while a person taking a tour of the Arboretum from UW Extension does not. Since a student applying to the UW must submit transcripts from all other institutions attended, the adviser can in case of doubt verify enrollment from the transfer evaluation or by calling an admissions specialist in the Admissions Office. The adviser may need to have the student provide a transcript verifying enrollment in non-credit courses, although if the adviser feels the student is trustworthy this is not necessary. If the date of college entry is still unclear, contact one of the counselors at Undergraduate Advising.

General Education Course Archives

The administration of general education requirements at the UW follows the basic principle that no student should be disadvantaged by a change in requirements. Thus, a student is allowed to use a course toward general education requirements that was applicable to when s/he took it, even if it no longer counts that way if taken currently. In addition, there are many courses on students' records that no longer exist, or that are no longer recognizable because they have changed numbers or department prefixes. This section is a guide for advisers concerning courses that no longer count the way they once did.

From autumn 1962 to autumn 1994, UW students chose their general-education courses from various "distribution lists." The graduation requirements were substantially revised effective autumn quarters of 1969, 1980, 1983, and 1985; meanwhile, adjustments to the several lists were made on an ongoing basis. Because successive versions of the lists were increasingly restrictive, students were allowed to continue to use the requirements they had been following, and new requirements were applied only to new students.

Because the current "Area of Knowledge" requirement adopted in 1994 is very generous, it has been possible to eliminate the confusion of maintaining several distribution lists. All students, regardless of when they entered college or the UW, choose their general-education coursework from the same set of courses, namely the current Areas of Knowledge lists.

Students eligible for the green or white distribution lists, which preceded the current Areas of Knowledge requirement, are eligible to count some additional courses, and/or to count some courses in different ways than are currently allowed. These exceptions are noted in the course list.

Variable-topic courses

Starting in the academic year 2000-2001, individual sections of variable-topic courses, in a specific quarter, can be identified as VLPA, I&S, and/or NW. Any course so tagged will be assigned properly in a DARS report.

Variable-topic courses offered earlier (and many offered since this change, since departments often don't bother to request an AoK designation for temporary courses) can count toward AoK if it seems appropriate. Any academic adviser, after discussing the content of such a course with the student, can assign the course to an Area and either enter a DARS exception or send a message to dars@u.washington.edu, requesting that the variable-topic course be tagged for the student.

Advisers not certain how to evaluate a variable-topic course may refer the student to Undergraduate Advising.

This table lists some sections of variable-topics courses that were approved for AofK value by request of the department, or that automatically count for an Area because of a temporary joint listing. Any course can be counted in the same way as a jointly offered course, even if not listed below.

Independent-study courses

These courses, often numbered 498 or 499, do not routinely count toward Areas of Knowledge. An Arts and Sciences student who wishes to count such a course toward AoK must submit a description of the course content to Scott Winter at the Undergraduate Advising; an email is usually sufficient. If the content of the independent-study project is similar to courses already on the AoK lists, the request should be approved.

A "white-list" student, a student who entered the UW as a freshman before autumn 1980, or entered the College of Arts and Sciences as a transfer student (even if from another college of the University) before autumn 1982, may count independent-study courses toward AoK without petition, if the courses were taken before autumn 1994. A DARS exception will be necessary and can be made by any adviser.

Joint listings

A course counts toward Areas of Knowledge in the same way as any joint-listed course. Permanent joint listings are already appropriately identified in the Course Catalog and the Time Schedule. Each quarter, however, there are temporary joint listings, usually in variable-topic courses, that may not be properly identified. In all such cases, the joint-listed courses share AoK designations. For example, if course A is VLPA and it is temporarily joint-listed with course B which is I&S, the student who takes course A or B in that quarter may count either course toward VLPA or I&S.

In most cases, since these are usually upper-division courses, the student has already completed the Areas of Knowledge requirement and doesn't need the course to count toward AoK. If the student does need to have such a course properly tagged VLPA, I&S, or NW, the adviser can enter a DARS exception or send the request to dars@u.washington.edu

Time schedule errors

Courses with an incorrect AoK designation in the Time Schedule may be counted as indicated by students who were not aware of the error. It is the student's responsibility to call the adviser's attention to the situation. The adviser should first check the Student Database for the course and quarter in question; quarterly course information is available in the SDB back through spring 1984. It is possible, however, that the AoK designation was corrected in the SDB when the error was discovered. Undergraduate Advising maintains an archive of old print Time Schedules and should be able to verify errors that occurred through summer 2002, which was the last quarter the Time Schedule was printed.

GIS and A&S courses

A variety of interdisciplinary courses are taught on a temporary basis under the designation GIS (and, before that, A&S). These are listed, with their assigned general education designation, in AoK for A&S, GIS, and GEN ST Courses. From 1971-1975 some GIS courses were offered through the Residential Program.

Transfer courses

Students who enter the UW with a transfer associate degree from a Washington community college may count transfer courses toward AoK in the same way that the courses counted at the community college. See the Transfer Associate Degree Agreement.

A transfer course assigned a UW course number can normally be counted only the way the UW equivalent counts at the time of transfer and thereafter. If the course was taken at a Washington community college it can, however, be counted as listed in the equivalencies tablesat the time it was taken, even if no longer counted that way at the UW. That is to say, if the student was following the tables and acting in good faith, the student will not be penalized for an incorrect listing.

If a course is listed below as having been dropped from the UW curriculum, or as not currently offered, then transfer credit for the course can be used toward the Area of Knowledge indicated in the transfer equivalencies. The presumption is that if the course were still offered at the UW, it would still count as it did in the past.

DARS reports

Many of the courses listed below will not be properly identified on a DARS report. To have any course properly tagged with an AoK or other general education designation, as listed below, send a request to dars@u.washington.edu

Adviser responsibilities

Obviously, no adviser is expected to commit any part of the list below to memory. Neither is it the responsiblity of advisers to check every course taken by a student in an exhaustive search for courses that will count toward requirements. This list is provided as a resource for the adviser to check whenever a student recalls that a course should count toward a particular requirement, even though it doesn't appear on the current Areas of Knowledge list.

Types of courses listed

"Green-list" courses taken before autumn 1994 

These courses may be used by students who were formerly eligible for the green distribution list-i.e., students whose first enrollment in college (anywhere) was before autumn 1985. The courses may be used only if they were taken before autumn 1994.

"White-list" courses taken before autumn 1994 

These courses may be used by students who were formerly eligible for the white distribution list-i.e., students who entered UW as freshmen before autumn of 1980 or who entered the College of Arts and Sciences as transfer students (even if only from another college of the University) before autumn 1982. These courses also may be used only if they were taken before autumn 1994.

Courses whose AoK designation has changed 

A few courses have been moved from one Area to another, either because the course was re-evaluated or because the content of the course was changed. There are also a few instances in which the blue distribution list (1985-94) allowed courses that the current Areas of Knowledge requirement does not.

Courses (or course numbers) not in the current curriculum 

These courses no longer appear in the curriculum with the prefix and number listed, but may be counted as indicated by all students who completed the courses.

Changes in prefixes 

This information should help advisers identify courses on the UW transcript that carry prefixes no longer in use.

CourseCan be counted forComments
A&S changed to GIS
A ORG changed to O E (and other Business departments)
A ORG 420, 440, 460I&Sif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; changed prefixes and numbers
AAS 400VLPA onlyreplaced by 401, 402, 403
AES 214VLPA onlychanged to AFRAM/ENGL 214
AES 321VLPA onlydropped from curriculum
AFRAM 210VLPAchanged to AFRAM 211
AFRAM 215, 220, 350, 410VLPA or I&Snot currently offered
AFRAM 406, 407, 408 (Intermediate Krio)VLPA onlynot currently offered
AFSTU changed to SISAF
AIS 215, 309, 310VLPA or I&Snot currently offered
ANTH 220, 320NW or I&Snumber changed to 206
ANTH 230VLPAif student began college anywhere before autumn 1985, and took the course before autumn 1994
ANTH 333, 334, 335VLPA onlyreplaced by 331
ANTH 359, 403VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994
ANTH 450VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; changed to ANTH 359
ANTH 456, 457VLPAdropped from curriculum
ARAM changed to ARAMIC (Aramaic; Near E L&L)
ARCH 152I&Sdropped from curriculum
ARCH 450VLPAdropped from curriculum
ARCHY 105VLPAif student began college anywhere before autumn 1985, and took the course before autumn 1994
BALTIC 200VLPA or I&Schanged to SCAND/SISRE 345
BI HS (Biomedical History) changed to MHE (Medical History & Ethics)
BI HS (MHE) 401, 403, 419, 430VLPAif student began college anywhere before autumn 1985, and took the course before autumn 1994
BI HS 421NWchanged to grad students only; (MHE 421 taken now would count for I&S instead of NW)
BI HS 425, 431NWif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
BLK S changed to AFRAM
BOT changed to BOTANY; in autumn 2003 changed to BIOL with some course number changes
BG&S (Business, Governmentt, and Society) changed to O E
BG&S 101I&SIntroduction to Business, dropped from curriculum; still offered at a number of community colleges (usually transfers as BA 1XX)
BG&S 200I&Schanged to O E 200; then changed to MGMT 200)
BG&S 333I&Sif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; changed to OE 302
C LIT 240English compcan be used for VLPA only if taken before autumn 1994; cannot be used for both English comp and VLPA, regardless of when taken
C SCI changed to CSE
C SCI 201, 210, 211NW and Q/SR (orold proficiency)dropped from curriculum
CAUP 200VLPA or I&Schanged to ARCH 200
CEWA changed to CIVE
CEWA 450NWchanged to CIVE 250
CEWA 456NWif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
CINEVLPA (all)Cinema Studies; no longer offered
CLAS 324VLPAif student began college anywhere before autumn 1985, and took the course before autumn 1994
CLAS 420, 422VLPA or I&Snot currently offered
CMU changed to COM with some numbering changes
CMU 201may be used for VLPA if taken autumn 1983if student began college anywhere before autumn 1985, and took the course before autumn 1994; formerly 214
CMU 214VLPA or I&Sreplaced by 201
CMU 214, 377, 480VLPAif student began college anywhere before autumn 1985, and took the course before autumn 1994
CMU 302VLPA or I&Sdropped from curriculum
CMU 321, 324, 326, 373VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994
CHID 207VLPAif student began college anywhere before autumn 1985, and took the course before autumn 1994
CHID 221, 340VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
CHID 380VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994
DAN changed to DANISH
DRDNC changed to DANCE
EASIA changed to SISEA
ECON 281I&S or NWchanged to ECON 311
ECON 311NWformerly joint-listed with STAT 311
EDEPS changed to EDPGA
EDPGA 479I&Sif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994
All ENGL courses, including compositionVLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994
ENGL 111, 121VLPA if taken before autumn 1986not allowed toward VLPA if taken autumn 1986 or later; cannot be used for both English composition and VLPA
ENGL 122VLPA; old proficiencydropped from curriculum
ENGL 170old proficiencynot currently offered
ENGL 171old proficiencynot currently offered
ENGL 172old proficiencydropped from curriculum
ENGL 181old proficiency; English composition proficiencychanged to ENGL 131; may request credit for both if 131 taken winter or spring 1988
ENGL 270 (grammar)old proficiencychanged to ENGL 170
ENGL 271VLPA if taken before autumn 1985not allowed if taken autumn 1985 or later
ENGL 272VLPA; old proficiencychanged to ENGL 379 (now 381)
ENGL 274, 275, 276, 277,278, 386, 387, 388old proficiency(now also VLPA)not allowed for proficiency if student entered UW in autumn 1981 or later
ENGR 130English compositiondropped from curriculum; may still be counted if taken at another college
ENGR 141NW and Q/SR (orold proficiency)dropped from curriculum
ENGR 190NWdropped from curriculum
ENGR 305, 307, 308NWif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
ENGR 378VLPAdropped from curriculum
ENGR 421I&Sif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994
ENV S 250Q/SR and NWsame as CIVE 250; dropped from curriculum
ENV S 307Q/SR and NWdropped from curriculum
ENV S 301I&Sdropped from curriculum
ENV S 342, 432I&Sif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
ESC 490CNW, winter 2000first offering of ESC 111
FOR B, FOR M, FRM changed to F M; some courses changed to ESC
FRENCH 480, 498VLPA or I&Snot currently offered
FRM 100I&S or NWdropped from curriculum (Changed from natural science to I&S effective autumn 1994, but not offered thereafter.)
FRM 102, 200, 202, 210, 310, 350NWchanged to ESC
F M 421I&S or NWchanged to 321
FOR B 300NWdropped from curriculum
FOR B/FRM 301I&Sdropped from curriculum
FOR B 329, 453, 460NWif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; changed prefixes and numbers
FREN changed to FRENCH
G ST changed to GEN ST
GENET changed to GENOME
GEOL changed to ESS
GEOPHYS changed to GEOPHYS
GERM changed to GERMAN
GERMAN 354VLPA or I&Snot currently offered
GERMAN 497, 498VLPA if taken before autumn 1994individual study courses taken now do not count for Areas of Knowledge requirements
GIS see A&S, GIS, and GEN ST Courses and The Residential Program
GRK changed to GREEK
H A&S 220, 221, 222NWHonors science sequence, normally open to Honors Program students only. Courses may be used for NW if student graduates with regular AofK instead of meeting Honors requirements.
H A&S 251, 252, 253; 261, 262, 263VLPA or I&SHonors Western Civilization and World Civilization sequences, normally open to Honors Program students. Courses may be used for either VLPA or I&S if student graduates with regular AofK instead of meeting Honors requirements.
H EC Home Economics; no longer offered (except NUTR); see also TSCS
H EC 240, 321, 322, 329, 347, 429, 432, 433VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
H EC 307, 408, 415NWif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
H EC 350, 354, 356, 409, 454, 457I&Sif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
H EC 407NWchanged to NUTR 421; later dropped from curriculum
H ED Health Education; no longer offered
HD UR changed to HINDI
HST changed to HIST
HIST 205, 207, 242, 307, 310, 311, 312, 313, 315, 410VLPAif student began college anywhere before autumn 1985, and took the course before autumn 1994
HIST 234VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
HIST 308VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; not currently being offered
HIST 411, 412; HSTAS 401, 402; HSTEU 421VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994
HRMOB 400I&Sif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994
HSS Humanistic-Social Studies, College of Engineering; no longer offered
HSS 301I&Sif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; changed to ENGR 301
HSS 319, 410, 420, 422, 425, 431, 435I&Sif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
HSS 351, 352, 461VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
HSS 310, 320, 419, 421,I&Sdropped from curriculum
HSS 450VLPAchanged to ENGL/ENGR 378
HSS 451, 465, 471, 472, 480VLPAdropped from curriculum
HSTAA 402VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
HSTAA 421VLPAif student began college anywhere before autumn 1985, and took the course before autumn 1994
HSTAM 203, 336, 452, 453VLPAif student began college anywhere before autumn 1985, and took the course before autumn 1994
HSTAM 334, 335, 415VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
HSTEU 370VLPA or I&Schanged to HSTAM 370
HSTEU 401, 410VLPAif student began college anywhere before autumn 1985, and took the course before autumn 1994
HSTEU 403 I&S if taken before autumn 2002; VLPA or I&S if taken autumn 2002 or later
HUM Humanities; no longer in existence; courses count for VLPA
HUM 201VLPAdropped from curriculum
I BUS 300, 310I&Sif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994
INDN Indian; some classes transferred to URDU autumn 2004
IASIA Inner Asia; all courses dropped from curriculum or transferred to other departments; courses count for I&S
KIN, KINPE Kinesiology/Physical Education; no longer offered
KIN 325, 331, 332NWdropped from curriculum
KIN 414VLPA (or I&S)if student began college anywhere before autumn 1985, and took the course before autumn 1994; changed to BI HS 481
KIN 480NWif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
KINPE 220VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
KOR changed to KOREAN
L ARC changed to L ARCH
LAT changed to LATIN
LIBR 450, 451, 453, 470VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994
MATH 100, 102, 103NWif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994
MATH 101NW if taken before autumn 1970if student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; no longer carries credit
MATH 104NW if taken before autumn 1972if student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; no longer carries credit
MHE 401,403, 430, 481VLPAif student began college anywhere before autumn 1985, and took the course before autumn 1994
MHE 419VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994
MICRO changed to MICROM
MUSIC 343NW if taken before autumn 1994can be used for VLPA regardless of when taken
MUSIC 389VLPA or I&Schanged to MUSAP
MUSIC 453I&Schanged to 345
N E changed to NEAR E
NEAR E 320, 430VLPA or I&Schanged to 211
NUTR 307, 321, 407, 415, 440NWif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
NUTR 409, 457I&Sif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
NUTR 400, 409, 422, 457I&Sdropped from curriculum
NUTR 421NWdropped from curriculum
O E 200I&Schanged to MGMT 200
O E 302, 440I&Sif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994
P E Physical Education; no longer offered. (Later KIN, KINPE)
P E 220, 414VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
P E 325, 331, 332, 480NWif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
PBSCI Psychiatry & Behavioral Science; no longer offers undergrad general ed course
PBSCI 267I&Sif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
PBSCI 451, 452I&Sif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994
PEDNC changed to DANCE
PHCOL (Pharmacology) changed to PHARM
PHCOL 300NWif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
PHIL 100VLPA if taken before autumn 1978if student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; changed to social science (I&S)
PHIL 160VLPA if taken before autumn 1979if student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; changed to natural science autumn 1979, and to I&S autumn 1994
PHIL 101, 104, 105, 106, 206, 250, 267, 320, 321, 322, 327, 350VLPAif student began college anywhere before autumn 1985, and took the course before autumn 1994
PHIL 370, 372, 473NWif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994
PHIL 484I&Sif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994
POL S 205 before winter 1987Q/SR orold proficiencychanged to POL S 290, winter 1987; new 205 does not count for Q/SR
POL S 212VLPAif student began college anywhere before autumn 1985, and took the course before autumn 1994
PSYCH 102NWdropped from curriculum
PSYCH 222NWdropped from curriculum
PSYCH 209I&S or NW if taken before spring 1980; NW if taken before autumn 1990does not count for Areas of Knowledge if taken autumn 1990 or later
PSYCH 209, 213, 217, 218, 231, 406, 475NWif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994
PSYCH 210NW if taken before autumn 1994, or if taken summer 1995 or 1996can be used for I&S regardless of when taken; listed as NW by error in summer Quarter Bulletin, 1995 and 1996
PSYCH 439I&Sdropped from curriculum
QMETH 200old proficiencyand NWdropped from curriculum (replaced by I S 300)
QMETH 403NWif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994
RECPL Recreation Planning and Administration; no longer offered
REEU changed to SISRE (Russian & East European)
RELIG 201, 202, 203, 210, 301, 310, 311, 313, 315, 320, 321, 322, 324, 330, 352, 354, 415, 420, 421VLPAif student began college anywhere before autumn 1985, and took the course before autumn 1994
RELIG 325, 326, 380, 439, 467, 468, 491, 492VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994
ROM changed to ROMAN +ROM LI (Romance L&L; Romance Linguistics)
SASIA changed to SISSA (South Asian studies)
SASIA 100VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
SASIA 472, 491, SISSA 472, 491VLPA or I&Sif student began college anywhere before autumn 1985, and took the course before autumn 1994; changed to RELIG 354, 352
SCAND 382I&Sif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994
SCAND 383VLPA or I&Sdropped from curriculum
SCAND 390I&Sif student began college anywhere before autumn 1985, and took the course before autumn 1994
SCAND 426I&S onlydropped from curriculum
SER C changed to CR SB (Croatian-Serbian)
SISAF 265VLPAif student began college anywhere before autumn 1985, and took the course before autumn 1994
SISAF 410VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; changed to AFRAM 410
SISAF 416, 417, 418VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
SISAF 450VLPA or I&Snot currently offered
SISEA 234VLPAif student began college anywhere before autumn 1985, and took the course before autumn 1994
SISEA 240VLPA or I&Sno longer in curriculum; transfer credit may be used for either I&S or VLPA
SISEA 240; SISJE 421; SISRE 403, 450; SISSA 386VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994
SISEA 417VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
SISIA Inner Asia; no longer in use; courses dropped from curriculum or transferred to other departments
SISJE 421VLPA or I&Snot currently offered
SISRE 243VLPAif student began college anywhere before autumn 1985, and took the course before autumn 1994
SISSA 100VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
SISSA 210VLPAif student began college anywhere before autumn 1985, and took the course before autumn 1994
SOC W changed to SOCWF (Social Welfare, School of Social Work)
SOC 223I&S; Q/SR or old proficiencychanged to SOC 323
SOC 323Q/SR or old proficiency, and I&Snot currently offered
SP CMU Changed to COM with some renumbering; see http://www.com.washington.edu/Program/Undergrad/ spcrenumber.html
SPAN 231VLPA or I&Snot currently offered
SPCH changed to SP CMU; also SPHSC, ca. 1975
SPCH [SP CMU] 100VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; changed to SPHSC 100
SPCH [SP CMU] 101VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; changed to SPHSC 101; later dropped from curriculum
SPCH [SP CMU] 300NWchanged to SPHSC 300
SPCH [SP CMU] 301NWif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; changed to SPHSC 201
SPHSC 101, 104VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
SPHSC 302I&Sif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
SPHSC 310Q/SR and NWdropped from curriculum
TSCS Textile Studies & Costume Studies; no longer offered
TSCS 321, 322, 329, 429VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
TSCS 432VLPAdropped from curriculum
TSCS 433VLPAdropped from curriculum
UDRE 315I&Sdropped from curriculum
UGAR changed to UGARIT (Ugaritic; Near E L&L)
URB P changed to URBDP (Urban Design & Planning)
URB P 300VLPA if taken before winter 1984if student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994
URB P 400VLPA or I&Sif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; changed to URBDP 300
URBDP 340VLPAif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
URBDP 450I&Sif student is white list, and took the course before autumn 1994; dropped from curriculum
WLF S (Wildlife Science) changed to ESC (Ecosystem Science and Conservation, College of Forest Resources)
WLF S 350NWchanged to FOR B 350, later to FRM 350
WOMEN 206VLPAif student began college anywhere before autumn 1985, and took the course before autumn 1994

White list:  Student entered the UW as a freshman before autumn 1980, or entered the College of Arts and Sciences as a transfer student (even if from another college of the University) before autumn 1982, and took the course before autumn 1994.

A&S, GIS, and GEN ST Courses

Starting below is a list of Arts and Sciences (A&S), General and Interdisciplinary Studies (GIS), and General Studies (GEN ST, formerly G ST) courses for past quarters, to be used in determining how these courses may be applied toward the pre-1985 15-credit proficiency requirement and the current Areas of Knowledge requirement.

A&S

"Arts and Sciences" courses were initiated in winter 1969, covering topics outside the province of any single department. On student transcripts, the course title for A&S courses is always "Perspectives and Issues." Note that in some cases different A&S courses in succeeding quarters carried the same numbers; applicability to requirements, therefore, depends on the quarter in which the course was taken.

GIS

Beginning in autumn 1970, the A&S designation was replaced by GIS. Again, different GIS courses in succeeding quarters may carry the same number, so the adviser must determine the quarter in which the course was taken before assigning the course to requirements.

GEN ST

General Studies (GEN ST, previously G ST) courses are frequently confused with General and Interdisciplinary Studies (GIS) courses. Although some writing-link courses were offered under the G ST heading from 1982 to 1984 (shown as GEN ST on current transcripts), the General Studies prefix is not used for general-education courses. None of the current GEN ST courses count toward general education requirements.

Writing links

GIS (and GEN ST) writing labs, first offered in autumn 1977, became ENGL 197, 198, and 199 in autumn 1984. All writing labs, now called writing links, count toward the pre-1985 A&S 15-credit proficiency requirement, and/or the English composition requirement of any UW college or major. All writing labs/links may also count toward VLPA for students who were formerly on the white distribution list (see Previous General Education Requirements). These are marked "Prof/VLPA" below if before autumn 1980, when entering students were no longer eligible for the white distribution list. From then onward, they are marked "Prof/None."

Course list 1969 to present

Quarter      Course   Requirement
Winter 1969   A&S 103   
A&S 105
I&S
NW
   
Spring 1969   A&S 102
A&S 104
A&S 401
A&S 403
A&S 405
A&S 406
VLPA or I&S
I&S
VLPA
I&S
I&S or NW
VLPA or NW
   
Autumn 1969   A&S 102
A&S 103
A&S 105
A&S 106
A&S 401
A&S 402
A&S 403
VLPA or I&S I&S
NW
NW
VLPA or I&S
VLPA
I&S
   
Winter 1970   A&S 102
A&S 106
A&S 402
VLPA or I&S
NW
NW
   
Spring 1970   A&S 101H
A&S 103
A&S 104
A&S 105
A&S 106
A&S 401
A&S 402
A&S 403
A&S 404
A&S 405
A&S 406
None
None
None
NW
NW
None
VLPA or I&S
I&S
VLPA or I&S
I&S or NW
I&S
   
Summer 1970   A&S 101
A&S 401
A&S 403
A&S 404
I&S
None
I&S
None
   
Autumn 1970   GIS 101
GIS 102
GIS 103
GIS 106
GIS 200H
GIS 201H
GIS 209
GIS 210
GIS 300
GIS 301
GIS 302
GIS 305
GIS 310
GIS 361
GIS 370
GIS 400H
GIS 405
GIS 407
GIS 420
GIS 425
GIS 431
GIS 451
GIS 460
GIS 466
GIS 480
GIS 481
None
VLPA or I&S
I&S
NW
None
None
None
I&S
VLPA
None
None
I&S
I&S
None
VLPA
None
I&S or NW
None
None
I&S
I&S
VLPA
I&S
None
VLPA
I&S
   
Winter 1971   GIS 101
GIS 102
GIS 107
GIS 200H
GIS 206
GIS 207
GIS 208
GIS 301
GIS 303
GIS 305
GIS 313
GIS 315
GIS 321
GIS 335
GIS 371
GIS 375
GIS 378
GIS 379
GIS 380
GIS 400H
GIS 401
GIS 404
GIS 406
GIS 407
GIS 408
GIS 410
GIS 412
None
VLPA or I&S
NW
None
I&S
VLPA
None
None
None
I&S
I&S
I&S
VLPA
None
VLPA
I&S
I&S
VLPA
VLPA
VLPA
VLPA
VLPA or I&S
VLPA or I&S
None
I&S
I&S
I&S
   
Spring 1971   GIS 108
GIS 109
GIS 110
GIS 251
GIS 252
GIS 253
GIS 254
GIS 299
GIS 304
GIS 306
GIS 314
GIS 316
GIS 317
GIS 318
GIS 319
GIS 320
GIS 322
GIS 323H
GIS 335
GIS 372
GIS 375
GIS 376
GIS 380
GIS 381
GIS 382
GIS 402
GIS 405
GIS 407
GIS 409
GIS 410
GIS 411
GIS 461
GIS 462
GIS 463
GIS 464
GIS 465
GIS 466
GIS 467
NW
NW
VLPA
VLPA
I&S
None
I&S
None
None
I&S
I&S
I&S
None
I&S
I&S
I&S
None
VLPA
I&S
VLPA
None
None
VLPA
VLPA
I&S
VLPA or I&S
I&S or NW
None
None
I&S
I&S
I&S
None
VLPA or I&S
VLPA
I&S
NW
I&S
   
Summer 1971   GIS 326
GIS 403
GIS 413
GIS 462
GIS 468
GIS 469
GIS 470
VLPA
I&S
I&S
None
I&S
None
None
   
Autumn 1971   GIS 102
GIS 112
GIS 113
GIS 200H
GIS 252
GIS 255
GIS 299
GIS 307
GIS 308
GIS 323
GIS 324
GIS 327
GIS 328
GIS 369
GIS 373
GIS 400H
GIS 406
GIS 410
GIS 411
GIS 421
VLPA or I&S
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
None
I&S
None
None
None
None
VLPA
None
None
None
VLPA
VLPA
None
VLPA or I&S
I&S
I&S
None
   
Winter 1972   GIS 114
GIS 115
GIS 200H
GIS 202
GIS 207
GIS 299
GIS 305
GIS 306
GIS 309
GIS 320
GIS 321
GIS 327
GIS 328
GIS 329
GIS 342
GIS 374
GIS 381
GIS 386
GIS 387
GIS 400H
GIS 410
GIS 411
GIS 414
GIS 415
GIS 416
GIS 417
GIS 418
GIS 419
GIS 421
GIS 445
GIS 466
GIS 471
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
None
None
VLPA
None
I&S
I&S
I&S
I&S
VLPA
None
None
I&S
I&S
VLPA
VLPA
VLPA
VLPA
None
I&S
I&S
I&S
VLPA
I&S
I&S
I&S
I&S
None
I&S
NW
None
   
Spring 1972   GIS 109
GIS 116
GIS 117
GIS 203
GIS 212
GIS 245
GIS 255
GIS 299
GIS 305
GIS 317
GIS 327
GIS 330
GIS 331
GIS 332
GIS 337
GIS 338
GIS 339
GIS 341
GIS 345
GIS 352
GIS 355
GIS 357
GIS 360
GIS 366
GIS 369
GIS 377
GIS 411
GIS 421
GIS 462
GIS 467
GIS 474
GIS 475
GIS 476
NW
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
VLPA or I&S
None
VLPA
None
None
I&S
None
None
None
None
VLPA
VLPA
I&S
VLPA
VLPA
I&S
VLPA
I&S
NW
I&S
VLPA
VLPA
VLPA
I&S
None
None
I&S
I&S
None
VLPA or I&S
   
Summer 1972   GIS 305
GIS 426
GIS 472
GIS 473
I&S
I&S
I&S
I&S
   
Autumn 1972   GIS 118
GIS 119
GIS 122
GIS 123
GIS 126
GIS 127
GIS 200
GIS 213
GIS 215
GIS 221
GIS 256
GIS 257
GIS 260
GIS 261
GIS 262
GIS 266
GIS 267
GIS 268
GIS 300
GIS 305
GIS 307
GIS 323
GIS 333
GIS 334
GIS 353
GIS 355
GIS 369
GIS 383
GIS 384
GIS 385
GIS 392
GIS 393
GIS 400
GIS 410
GIS 421
GIS 429
GIS 430
GIS 432
GIS 433
GIS 434
GIS 435
GIS 440
GIS 443
GIS 449
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
None
None
VLPA
VLPA or I&S
None
VLPA or NW
None
None
None
None
None
None
Nat or I&S
I&S
None
VLPA
VLPA or I&S
None
I&S
I&S
VLPA
VLPA
I&S
VLPA
None
Nat or I&S
None
I&S
None
None
None
None
None
None
Nat or I&S
I&S
None
VLPA
   
Winter 1973   GIS 118
GIS 119
GIS 120
GIS 121
GIS 122
GIS 123
GIS 124
GIS 125
GIS 126
GIS 127
GIS 128
GIS 129
GIS 200
GIS 203
GIS 205
GIS 216
GIS 219
GIS 223
GIS 245
GIS 260
GIS 261
GIS 262
GIS 266
GIS 267
GIS 268
GIS 305
GIS 308
GIS 310
GIS 317
GIS 320
GIS 335
GIS 338
GIS 367
GIS 369
GIS 376
GIS 378
GIS 379
GIS 400
GIS 410
GIS 411
GIS 421
GIS 430
GIS 436
GIS 438
GIS 446
GIS 447
GIS 448
GIS 449
GIS 450
GIS 474
GIS 475
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
None
VLPA or I&S
None
VLPA
NW
VLPA
VLPA
None
None
None
None
None
None
I&S
None
I&S
None
I&S
VLPA
I&S
VLPA
VLPA
VLPA
VLPA or I&S
None
None
I&S
I&S
None
None
I&S or NW
None
None
None
None
VLPA
VLPA
VLPA or I&S
None
   
Spring 1973   GIS 109
GIS 118
GIS 119
GIS 120
GIS 121
GIS 122
GIS 123
GIS 124
GIS 125
GIS 126
GIS 127
GIS 128
GIS 129
GIS 205
GIS 217
GIS 219
GIS 222
GIS 224
GIS 238
GIS 256
GIS 258
GIS 260
GIS 261
GIS 262
GIS 266
GIS 267
GIS 268
GIS 311
GIS 313
GIS 332
GIS 335
GIS 340
GIS 365
GIS 368
GIS 370
GIS 371
GIS 372
GIS 373
GIS 375
GIS 382
GIS 390
GIS 401
GIS 402
GIS 403
GIS 410
GIS 411
GIS 430
GIS 444
GIS 448
GIS 452
GIS 453
GIS 456
GIS 457
GIS 458
GIS 459
GIS 467
GIS 473
GIS 477
GIS 482
GIS 483
GIS 490
NW
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
None
VLPA
NW
None
VLPA
I&S
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
VLPA
I&S
VLPA
VLPA
I&S
VLPA
VLPA
None
None
None
I&S
None
VLPA
VLPA
I&S
I&S
I&S
I&S
I&S
None
I&S
None
VLPA
VLPA
VLPA
I&S
None
None
I&S
VLPA or I&S
VLPA
I&S
I&S
None
   
Summer 1973   GIS 305
GIS 343
GIS 354
GIS 430
GIS 473
GIS 479
GIS 491
GIS 492
I&S
I&S
VLPA
None
VLPA or I&S
VLPA
I&S
I&S
   
Autumn 1973   GIS 118
GIS 119
GIS 120
GIS 121
GIS 122
GIS 123
GIS 124
GIS 125
GIS 126
GIS 127
GIS 128
GIS 129
GIS 200
GIS 223
GIS 225
GIS 256
GIS 266
GIS 267
GIS 268
GIS 305
GIS 309
GIS 313
GIS 317
GIS 320
GIS 322
GIS 325
GIS 355
GIS 400
GIS 410
GIS 411
GIS 430
GIS 443
GIS 448
GIS 450
GIS 485
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
None
VLPA
VLPA
None
None
None
None
I&S
VLPA or I&S
I&S
None
I&S
VLPA
VLPA
I&S
None
I&S
I&S
None
I&S
None
VLPA
VLPA
   
Winter 1974   GIS 118
GIS 119
GIS 120
GIS 121
GIS 122
GIS 123
GIS 124
GIS 125
GIS 126
GIS 127
GIS 128
GIS 129
GIS 200
GIS 224
GIS 237
GIS 239
GIS 244
GIS 252
GIS 266
GIS 267
GIS 268
GIS 305
GIS 322
GIS 333
GIS 338
GIS 339
GIS 341
GIS 342
GIS 358
GIS 363
GIS 369
GIS 380
GIS 400
GIS 410
GIS 411
GIS 448
GIS 449
GIS 467
GIS 483
GIS 488
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
None
VLPA
VLPA
VLPA or NW
I&S
I&S
None
None
None
I&S
VLPA
None
I&S
I&S
I&S
VLPA
VLPA
I&S
VLPA
I&S
None
I&S
I&S
None
VLPA
I&S
I&S
VLPA
   
Spring 1974   GIS 109
GIS 118
GIS 119
GIS 120
GIS 121
GIS 122
GIS 123
GIS 124
GIS 125
GIS 126
GIS 127
GIS 128
GIS 129
GIS 200
GIS 201
GIS 205
GIS 238
GIS 257
GIS 266
GIS 267
GIS 268
GIS 301
GIS 302
GIS 313
GIS 315
GIS 325
GIS 330
GIS 334
GIS 335
GIS 337
GIS 345
GIS 357
GIS 360
GIS 364
GIS 373
GIS 374
GIS 410
GIS 411
GIS 414
GIS 451
GIS 453
GIS 459
GIS 468
GIS 475
GIS 489
GIS 494
GIS 495
NW
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
See Residential Program
None
I&S
None
VLPA
VLPA or NW
None
None
None
VLPA
I&S
I&S
VLPA
VLPA
I&S
None
VLPA
VLPA
I&S
NW
I&S
I&S
I&S
VLPA
I&S
I&S
I&S
I&S
VLPA
None
I&S
None
I&S
VLPA
VLPA
   
Summer 1974   GIS 300
GIS 304
GIS 305
GIS 308
GIS 313
GIS 331
GIS 352
GIS 410
GIS 411
GIS 420
GIS 437
GIS 483
GIS 496
GIS 497
VLPA
I&S
I&S
None
I&S
VLPA
None
I&S
I&S
None
VLPA
I&S
VLPA
VLPA or I&S
   
Autumn 1974   GIS 138
GIS 140
GIS 200
GIS 206
GIS 244
GIS 253
GIS 309
GIS 317
GIS 318
GIS 325
GIS 400
GIS 404
GIS 427
GIS 431
GIS 448
GIS 490
None
None
None
VLPA
I&S
None
None
None
VLPA
VLPA
None
VLPA
VLPA
I&S
None
None
   
Winter 1975   GIS 106
GIS 141
GIS 200H
GIS 220
GIS 240
GIS 243
GIS 254
GIS 302
GIS 313
GIS 316
GIS 325
GIS 326
GIS 327
GIS 335
GIS 340
GIS 361
GIS 400H
GIS 405
GIS 420
GIS 428
GIS 452
GIS 480
GIS 488
VLPA
None
None
I&S
VLPA or NW
I&S
None
I&S
I&S
I&S
VLPA
I&S
VLPA
VLPA
I&S
I&S
None
VLPA
None
VLPA
VLPA
VLPA
VLPA
   
Spring 1975   GIS 135
GIS 142
GIS 185
GIS 200H
GIS 202
GIS 210
GIS 253
GIS 257
GIS 306
GIS 317
GIS 332
GIS 335
GIS 338
GIS 353
GIS 357
GIS 381
GIS 400H
GIS 406
GIS 408
GIS 412
GIS 429
GIS 448
GIS 451
GIS 454
GIS 467
None
None
None
None
I&S
I&S
None
VLPA or NW
VLPA or I&S
I&S
VLPA
VLPA or I&S
I&S
VLPA
NW
VLPA or I&S
None
VLPA
VLPA
I&S
VLPA
None
I&S
VLPA
I&S
   
Summer 1975   GIS 209
GIS 218
GIS 243
GIS 301
VLPA
None
I&S
VLPA
   
Autumn 1975   GIS 110
GIS 140
GIS 200
GIS 207
GIS 219
GIS 223-
GIS 254
GIS 302
GIS 303
GIS 309
GIS 356
GIS 400
GIS 487
None
I&S or NW
None
None
None
VLPA
None
I&S
VLPA
VLPA or I&S
VLPA
None
I&S
   
Winter 1976   GIS 111
GIS 141
GIS 200H
GIS 203
GIS 207
GIS 213
GIS 221
GIS -224
GIS 227
GIS 228
GIS 246
GIS 253
GIS 381
GIS 400H
GIS 432
GIS 485
GIS 491
None
I&S or NW
None
None
None
VLPA
VLPA
VLPA
None
None
None
None
VLPA or I&S
None
None
VLPA
I&S
   
Spring 1976   GIS 112
GIS 142
GIS 202
GIS 208
GIS 214
GIS 221
GIS 229
GIS 231
GIS 254
GIS 302
GIS 304
GIS 312
GIS 319
GIS 409
GIS 432
GIS 465
None
I&S or NW
VLPA
None
VLPA
VLPA
None
None
None
I&S
I&S
I&S or NW
I&S
VLPA
None
VLPA
   
Summer 1976   GIS 209VLPA
   
Autumn 1976   GIS 110
GIS 140
GIS 200
GIS 205
GIS 207
GIS 215
GIS 221
GIS 223
GIS 242
GIS 247
GIS 253
GIS 302
GIS 305
GIS 377
GIS 399
GIS 400
GIS 487
None
I&S or NW
None
None
None
None
VLPA
VLPA
VLPA
None
None
I&S
None
VLPA or I&S
VLPA
None
None
   
Winter 1977   GIS 111
GIS 141
GIS 200
GIS 213
GIS 216
GIS 222
GIS 254
GIS 310
GIS 340
GIS 354
GIS 356
GIS 366
GIS 381
GIS 400
None
I&S or NW
None
VLPA
None
None
None
None
None
VLPA
None
VLPA or I&S
None
None
   
Spring 1977   GIS 112
GIS 142
GIS 202
GIS 208
GIS 214
GIS 217
GIS 253
GIS 311
GIS 314
GIS 353
None
I&S or NW
None
None
VLPA
None
None
None
None
VLPA
   
Summer 1977   no courses 
   
Autumn 1977   GIS 140
GIS 200
GIS 209
GIS 210
GIS 215
GIS 225
GIS 238
GIS 320
GIS 353
GIS 400
GIS 407
I&S or NW
None
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
VLPA or I&S
VLPA
None
None
   
Winter 1978   GIS 141
GIS 200
GIS 209
GIS 210
GIS 213
GIS 216
GIS 239
GIS 241
GIS 245
GIS 310
GIS 321
GIS 352
GIS 400
GIS 407
I&S or NW
None
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
VLPA or NW
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
None
VLPA or I&S
VLPA
None
None
   
Spring 1978   GIS 142
GIS 209
GIS 210
GIS 214
GIS 217
GIS 239
GIS 285
GIS 290
GIS 295
GIS 314
GIS 322
GIS 354
GIS 408
GIS 413
I&S or NW
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
VLPA or NW
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
None
VLPA or I&S
VLPA
None
VLPA
   
Summer 1978   GIS 357None
   
Autumn 1978   GIS 140
GIS 200
GIS 201
GIS 209
GIS 210
GIS 222
GIS 235
GIS 239
GIS 320
GIS 336
GIS 400
I&S or NW
None
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
VLPA or I&S
None
None
   
Winter 1979   GIS 141
GIS 200
GIS 201
GIS 209
GIS 210
GIS 213
GIS 216
GIS 222
GIS 239
GIS 321
GIS 400
I&S or NW
None
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
None
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
VLPA or I&S
None
   
Spring 1979   GIS 142
GIS 209
GIS 210
GIS 214
GIS 217
GIS 232
GIS 233
GIS 239
GIS 314
GIS 322
GIS 355
GIS 408
I&S or NW
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
None
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
None
VLPA or I&S
VLPA
None
   
Summer 1979    No courses offered
   
Autumn 1979   GIS 210
GIS 215
GIS 370
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
None
   
Winter 1980   GIS 200
GIS 209
GIS 216
GIS 400
None
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
None
   
Spring 1980   GIS 209
GIS 210
GIS 214
GIS 314
GIS 408
Prof/VLPA
Prof/VLPA
None
None
None
   
Summer 1980    No courses offered
   
Autumn 1980   GIS 200
GIS 209
GIS 210
GIS 213
GIS 216
GIS 239
GIS 400
None
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
None
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
None
   
Winter 1981   GIS 200
GIS 209
GIS 210
GIS 213
GIS 216
GIS 239
None
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
None
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
   
Spring 1981   GIS 209
GIS 210
GIS 217
GIS 239
GIS 353
GIS 367
GIS 422
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
None
None
None
   
Summer 1981    No courses offered.
   
Autumn 1981   GIS 200
GIS 209
GIS 210
GIS 215
GIS 383
GIS 400
None
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
None
None

NOTE: Beginning Winter 1982, most GIS writing labs were transferred to GEN ST.

Winter 1982   GIS 200
GIS 223
GIS 383
GIS 400
GEN ST 209   
GEN ST 210
GEN ST 216
GEN ST 220
GEN ST 239
None
Prof/None*
None
None
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
   
Spring 1982   GIS 222
GIS 353
GIS 383
GEN ST 209
GEN ST 210
GEN ST 217
GEN ST 221
GEN ST 239
Prof/None*
None
None
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
   
Summer 1982    No courses offered.
   
Autumn 1982   GIS 200H
GIS 271H
GIS 272H
GIS 273H
GIS 353
GEN ST 209
GEN ST 210
GEN ST 215
None
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
None
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
   
Winter 1983   GIS 200H
GIS 222
GIS 275
GIS 281H
GIS 282H
GIS 283H
GIS 400H
GEN ST 209
GEN ST 210
GEN ST 216
None
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
None
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
   
Spring 1983   GIS 137
GIS 223
GIS 275
GEN ST 209
GEN ST 210
GEN ST 217
None
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
   
Summer 1983    No courses offered.
   
Autumn 1983   GIS 200
GIS 271
GIS 272
GIS 273
GIS 400
GEN ST 209
GEN ST 210
GEN ST 215
None
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
None
Prof/None* 
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
   
Winter 1984   GIS 200
GIS 205
GIS 222
GIS 275
GIS 277
GIS 400
GEN ST 209
GEN ST 210
GEN ST 216
GEN ST 221
GEN ST 239
None
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
None
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
   
Spring 1984   GIS 205
GIS 212
GIS 223
GIS 274
GIS 275
GIS 278
GEN ST 209
GEN ST 210
GEN ST 217
GEN ST 239
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
   
Summer 1984   GIS 291
GEN ST 215
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
   
Autumn 1984   GIS 200H
GIS 265
GIS 271H
GIS 272H
GIS 273H
GIS 274H
GIS 400H
None
None
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
Prof/None*
None
   
Winter 1985   GIS 200H
GIS 265
GIS 400H
None
None
None
Spring 1985   GIS 265None
   
Summer 1985   GIS 265None
   
Autumn 1985-
Summer 2000   
GEN ST 
GIS 200H   
GIS 250
GIS 271H
GIS 272H
GIS 273H
GIS 274H
GIS 400H
None toward AoK
None
None
Comp/None*
Comp/None*
Comp/None*
Comp/None*
None
   
Autumn 2000 
(Early Fall Start)   
GEN ST 
GIS 160
GIS 165
GIS 170
None toward AoK
I&S
I&S
NW
   
Autumn 2001 
(Early Fall Start)   
GEN ST 
GIS 160
GIS 170
GIS 175
GIS 177
GIS 185
GIS 192
None toward AoK
I&S
NW
I&S or NW
I&S
I&S
I&S
   
Autumn 2002 
(Early Fall Start)   
GEN ST 
GIS 160
GIS 170
GIS 172
GIS 177
None toward AoK
I&S
NW
VLPA
I&S, W
   
Winter 2003   GEN ST 
GIS 130
None toward AoK
NW
   
Autumn 2003 
(Early Fall Start)   
GEN ST 
GIS 130
GIS 160
GIS 170
GIS 171
GIS 173
GIS 174
GIS 176
GIS 178
GIS 179
GIS 180
GIS 181
GIS 182
GIS 210
None toward AoK
NW
I&S or NW
NW
I&S
I&S
I&S
I&S
I&S
I&S
NW and Q
NW
NW
None
   
Winter 2004   GEN ST 
GIS 130
GIS 215
GIS 310
None toward AoK
NW
I&S
None
   
Spring 2004   GEN ST 
GIS 215
GIS 410
None toward AoK
I&S
None
   
Autumn 2004 
(Early Fall Start)   
GEN ST 
GIS 160
GIS 161
GIS 163
GIS 164
GIS 165
GIS 167
GIS 168
GIS 169
GIS 170
GIS 178
GIS 180
GIS 182
GIS 210
GIS 490
None toward AoK
I&S or NW
NW
VLPA
VLPA or I&S
I&S
NW
I&S
I&S
NW
I&S
NW and Q
NW
None
I&S
   
Winter 2005   GEN ST 
GIS 310
None toward AoK
None

* May be counted for VLPA by students formerly on the white distribution list.

The Residential Program

During the three school years from autumn 1971 through spring 1974, certain students participated in what was called the Residential Program. These students lived in Lander Hall and took some of their classes there. Participants in the program were allowed special dispensations regarding the proficiency and distribution requirements that were in effect at the time, as explained below.

All Residential Program students were eligible to use the "white-list" requirements. As former white-list students, they may continue to use the 15-credit pre-1985 proficiency requirement; they must now complete the current Areas of Knowledge requirement, but may use any white-list courses that they had completed before autumn 1994, counting humanities courses for Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts, social science courses for Individuals and Societies, and natural science courses for The Natural World. (Look for unfamiliar courses in the General Education Course Archives.)

Pre-1985 proficiency requirement

The original plan was that anyone who had been in the Residential Program at all would have the fifteen-credit proficiency requirement waived, so anyone who was in the program during 1971-72, even if for only one quarter, is exempt from the old proficiency requirement. Students who joined the program in 1972-73 or 1973-74, however, have only 5 credits of the proficiency requirement waived for each quarter they were in the program. The actual course numbers used in the program (e.g., GIS 112) are not assigned to proficiency. The waiver can simply be indicated on the student's graduation application by a notation such as: "Waived, Res. Prog., Aut 19725 cr."

Areas of Knowledge

The original plan was that students in the Residential Program would take 10 of their credits each quarter in the program, and that 5 of these would go toward humanities and 5 toward social science distribution (i.e., VLPA and I&S Areas of Knowledge). But there are complications, as shown in the chart below.

Distribution (Areas of Knowledge) designations of Residential Program courses

Autumn 1971
GIS 112 and 1135 credits VLPA and 5 credits I&S; choice of VLPA or I&S if only one taken
Winter 1972
ENGL 2515 credits VLPA
HUM 1025 credits VLPA
MUSIC 1205 credits VLPA
PHIL 1005 credits VLPA (now I&S; may be used for either area by these students)
GIS 1155 credits I&S
POL S 1025 credits I&S
PSYCH 1005 credits I&S
SOC 1105 credits I&S
GIS 1145 credits VLPA or I&S, whichever is not met by the other class; choice of VLPA or I&S if none of the other classes taken.
Spring 1972
GIS 116 and 1175 credits VLPA and 5 credits I&S; choice if only one taken
Autumn 1972
GIS 118 and 1195 credits NW if math course from Prof. Monk, plus choice of 5 credits VLPA or 5 credits I&S if both taken. If not from Prof. Monk, 5 credits VLPA and 5 credits I&S; choice if only one taken.
GIS 122 and 1235 credits VLPA and 5 credits I&S; choice if only one taken
GIS 126 and 1275 credits VLPA and 5 credits I&S; choice if only one taken
Winter 1973 through Spring 1974
GIS 118-1295 credits VLPA and 5 credits I&S each quarter; choice of VLPA or I&S if only one taken. (NOTE: Prof. Monk taught at least one of these, but it was not a mathematics course and does not count for NW.)

College Studies

The College Studies Program was an alternative to the general education requirement which was at that time called the distribution requirement and is now called Areas of Knowledge. The program was available to undergraduates in the College of Arts and Sciences from autumn quarter 1988 through summer quarter 1997.

College Studies sequences were 15-credit sequences of related general education courses. These sequences provided opportunities for non-majors to explore disciplines that are an essential part of a coIlege education, in courses designed to show how the disciplines and fields of study are organized, how they develop and change, and how they are related to other disciplines and the culture at large.

Fulfilling general education with College Studies sequences

A student could use a College Studies sequence to replace the regular 20-credit distribution (Areas of Knowledge) requirement in one, two, or all three of the distribution categories (Areas). The student was required to complete all other general education requirements, including the basic skills requirements (currently, English composition, additional writing, quantitative and symbolic reasoning, and foreign language.)

Under the old distribution requirement, students were not allowed to count courses in their major department toward distribution. Students who satisfied all three distribution areas (Areas of Knowledge) with College Studies sequences were allowed to count College Studies sequences that included courses in the student's major department, with no credit restriction. In other words, such students were allowed to overlap College Studies sequences with their major.

Under the current Areas of Knowledge policies, an eligible student who satisfies one or two Areas with College Studies sequences is allowed a total of 15 credits of overlap with his/her major. As in the past, an eligible student who satisfies all three Areas with College Studies sequences is allowed any amount of overlap with the major.

Eligibility for College Studies

Students who began a College Studies sequence when the program was in effect are still allowed to use College Studies sequences to meet either the old distribution requirement or the current Areas of Knowledge requirement, under the following conditions:

  • The student must have been matriculated in UW's College of Arts and Sciences at some time during the period from autumn quarter 1988 through summer quarter 1997.
  • The student must have completed with a passing grade at least one of the courses from the College Studies sequence during this period.
  • A College Studies sequence completed after summer 1997 can still be counted, as long as it was started when the program was active. If the courses needed to complete the sequence are no longer offered, the student can propose one or more substitutions in a petition to the Arts and Sciences Graduation Committee.
  • During the period when the College Studies program was available, sequences were both added to and removed from the program.
    • If a sequence was added to the program after the student enrolled in one or more of the courses, the student may count the sequence.
    • If a sequence was removed from the program before the student enrolled in any course in the sequence, the student may not count the sequence.

Humanities/Fine Arts (Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts)

Interpretation, Community, and Culture

Offered autumn 1988 - summer 1992

This sequence focuses on the interpretive nature of all activity and inquiry, not only at the university, but in an increasingly complicated world where cultures and interpretations clash in dramatic ways. The courses are structured to direct attention to written texts, to visual messags, and to books, artistic works, and social, political, and cultural events, as well as scientific experiment. The sequence also studies the situation of interpretive acts in interpretive communities distinguishable by their cultural, disciplinary, and institutional contingencies, interests, demands, and constraints.

Required courses:

  • C LIT 260   Interpretation as a Human Activity (5)
  • C LIT 360   Interpretation in Culture and Community (5)
  • C LIT 460   Interpretation in Humanistic Disciplines in the University (5)
Literature, Imagination, and Culture

Offered autumn 1988 - summer 1997

This is a set of courses devoted to ways of thinking about literature and its relation to culture. Each course explores literature from a different point of view and provides exercise in critical and reflective thought.

Required, three of the following courses:

  • ENGL 205   Method, Imagination, and Inquiry (5)
  • ENGL 302   Critical Practice (5) (formerly 346)
  • ENGL 307   Cultural Studies: Literature and the Age (5)
    The following topics were offered in different quarters:
    • Renaissance Culture
    • Men and Women in Eighteenth-Century Culture
    • Romanticism
    • Modernism
  • ENGL 363   Literature and the Other Arts and Disciplines (5) (formerly 408)
  • ENGL 470   Literature, Literary Study, and Society (5) (formerly 306)
The Arts and Aesthetics

Offered autumn 1989 - summer 1997

An exploration of historically changing concepts of the visual arts, music, and aesthetic history through an examination of art and music from various periods, as well as philosophical writing on the arts. Emphasis is on the flux in which artistic and aesthetic endeavors operate, so that it may be seen that current views of the function or purpose of the arts do not necessarily represent the views held in earlier periods.

Required, two of the following courses:

  • ART H 300   Ideas in Art (5) (formerly ART H 200)
  • ART H 382   Theory and Practice of Art Criticism (3)-Concurrently with 2 credits of ART H 499
  • MUSIC 384   Ideas in Music (5)

Plus one of the following courses.

  • PHIL 445   Philosophy of Art (5)
  • PHIL 446   Development of Aesthetic Theory (5)
How to Think about Moral Problems

Offered autumn 1989 - summer 1997

This sequence is intended to improve the understanding of moral decision making, in the belief that a basic knowledge of what others have advised can make a real difference to us when we come to make our own decisions. The courses consider specific contemporary moral problems and the kinds of reasoning available for dealing with them.

Required, one course from:

  • PHIL 102   Contemporary Moral Problems (5)
  • PHIL 240   Introduction to Ethics (5)

Plus two courses from:

  • PHIL 241   Topics in Ethics (5)
  • PHIL 340   History of Ancient Ethics (5)
  • PHIL 342   History of Modern Ethics (5)
  • PHIL 344   History of Recent Ethics (5)
  • PHIL 345   Moral Issues of Life and Death (5)
  • MHE 474/PHIL 411   Justice in Health Care (5)
The Classics in Literature and Life

Offered autumn 1989 - summer 1997

Classics as a scholarly discipline, treating the classical world from a number of vantage points: political and social, intellectual, literary, and artistic.

Required, three of the following:

  • CLAS 210   Greek and Roman Classics in English (5) (added 1991)
  • CLAS 320   Greek and Roman Private and Public Life (5)
  • CLAS 322   Intellectual History of Classical Greece (5)
  • CLAS 410   The Classical Tradition (5) (through 1992 only)
  • CLAS 427   Greek and Roman Tragedy in English (5)
The Spectrum of Literature

Offered autumn 1998 - summer 1997

An introduction to the nature of literary and critical studies and an explanation of the discipline of literature in a comparative framework, these courses ask a number of fundamental questions. What is literature? What forms does it take in different social and historical contexts? What functions does it serve? What are its relationships with other arts and disciplines? What approaches are required to analyze and enjoy it? What does it mean to study literature as one studies philosophy, the other arts, the social sciences, and the natural sciences?

Required, three of the following:

  • C LIT 200   Introduction to Comparative Literature (5)
  • C LIT 300   The Scope of Literary History (5) (formerly 370)
  • C LIT 371   Literature and the Visual Arts (5) (added 1995)
  • C LIT 400   Introduction to the Theory of Literature (5)
Argumentation in Society

Offered autumn 1988 - summer 1997

An exploration of the forms of argument used by speakers and writers when they seek to persuade audiences to accept actions and beliefs. A study in the essentials of argument, types of arguments, ways of making arguments, strategies for criticizing and responding to arguments, argument as it is practiced in society, and theoretical approaches to the study of argument.

Required:

  • SP CMU 334   Essentials of Argument (5)

Plus two courses from:

  • SP CMU 424   Rhetorical Perspective in Revolutionary Documents (5)
  • SP CMU 426   American Public Address (5)
  • SP CMU 428   British Public Address (5)
  • SP CMU 434   Argumentation Theory (5)
Art in Public Places

Offered autumn 1988 - summer 1997

This sequence looks at art in the public domain in a variety of ways: with respect to history, with respect to aesthetic and conceptual issues, and with respect to the processes and roles of artists, art administrators, communities, public officials, tradesmen, and industries. It also involves actual experience in the challenge of making art in a public place.

Required courses:

  • ART 275   A World History of Art in Public Places (5)
  • ART 276   Contemporary Directions, Art in Public Places (5)
  • ART 332   Intermediate Sculpture Composition (5, max 15)

Social Sciences (Individuals and Societies)

Science in Civilization

Offered autumn 1988 - summer 1997

This sequence studies the role of the natural sciences in the development of Western culture from the time of ancient Greece to the present. It investigates how scientists have organized knowledge of the natural world and how they have organized themselves in order to pursue that knowledge. Examines how the categories of modern science do not match those of earlier times and how the evolution of Western scientific thought has developed.

Required:

  • HIST 311/MHE 419   Science in Civilization: Antiquity to 1600 (5)
  • HIST 312   Science in Civilization: Science in Modern Society (5)

Plus one from:

  • HIST/ASTR 313   Science in Civilization: Physics and Astrophysics Since 1850 (5)
  • MHE 424   Modern Biology in Historical Perspective (5)
Western Civilization

Offered autumn 1988 - summer 1990

This sequence studies the history of Western civilization with special attention given to problems faced by the historian, especially those problems of evidence and causation, and the relationship of the discipline of history to other disciplines. There will be special discussion sections for students in the College Studies Program.

Required courses:

  • HIST 121   The Ancient World: Special Problems (5)
  • HIST 122   The Medieval World: Special Problems (5)
  • HIST 123   The Modern World: Special Problems (5)

Students were allowed to substitute HIST 111 for 121, HIST 112 for 122, and HIST 113 for 123.

American Ethnic Studies

Offered autumn 1988 - summer 1992

This sequence is a study of sociological, political, and humanistic approaches to the study of ethnicity in America, with emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach and an examination of American race and ethnic relations.

Required courses:

  • AES/SOC 362   American Race and Ethnic Relations (5)
  • AES 363   Foundations of Ethnic Studies (5)
  • AES 364   American Ethnicity in the Twenty-first Century (5)
Political Economy

Offered autumn 1988 - summer 1992

The sequence explores the perspectives of political science as a discipline and emphasizes the theories, methods, and concerns that it shares with other social sciences. Thus, students taking this sequence are exposed to economics, psychology, and anthropology as well as political science; and, thereby, they should emerge with a greater capacity to understand and evaluate our political process.

Required courses:

  • POL S 270   Introduction to Political Economy (5)
  • POL S 474   Government and the Economy (5) (formerly 370)
  • POL S 475   Public Choice (5)
The Evolution of Political Power

Offered autumn 1988 - summer 1997

The aim of this sequence is to bring together the insights of several disciplines into the problems of institutional development and change, particularly the development of the state.

Required courses:

  • POL S 273   The Concept of Political Power (5)
  • ANTH 373   Stateless Societies: An Ethnographic Approach (5)
  • POL S 411   Theories of the State (5)
People as Scientists of Themselves

Offered autumn 1988 - summer 1997

This sequence endeavors to study metacognition, wherein people act as scientists of the self. It is especially targeted for students with a strong interest in science who would like to know about a body of research in behavioral science.

Required:

  • PHIL 460   Philosophy of Science (5)
  • PSYCH 464   Metacognition (5)

Plus one course from:

  • PSYCH 462   Human Memory (5)
  • PSYCH 466   Psychological Aspects of Judgment and Decision (5)
American Political Culture

Offered autumn 1989 - summer 1997

This sequence examines the political content and character of both elite and popular cultural forms in America. By "political culture" is meant the language, symbols, icons, ideas, and ideals that have governed American public life.

Required:

  • ENGL 251/POL S 281   Introduction to American Political Culture (5) (formerly ENGL 281/POL S 281)

Plus two of the following courses:

  • ENGL 360   American Literature and Political Culture: Origins to 1865 (5)(formerly ENGL 282)
  • ENGL 361   American Literature and Political Culture: After1865 (5) (formerly ENGL 283)
  • POL S 318   American Political Thought (5)
  • HSTAA 410   American Social History: The Modern Era (5)
Language and Society

Offered autumn 1990 - summer 1997

This sequence examines the underlying relationships between language and society from a multidisciplinary perspective. It considers the historical processes by which language and language policies shape social relationships, principally through education; the impact of language policy on migration and the education of the labor force; and the use of language to control access to resources and institutions. It focuses in particular on the role of English as a world language and upon the impact of geography, class, gender, and ethnicity on language variation in North America.

Required courses:

  • ANTH 203   Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology (5)
  • ENGL 478   Language and Social Policy (5) (formerly ENGL 465)
  • ENGL 479   Language Variation and Language Policy in North America (5) (formerly ENGL 466)
Peace and War

Offered autumn 1994 - summer 1997

The sequence approaches the study of society through a broad examination of issues of peace and war.

Required, three of the following courses, including at least one of the * courses:

  • *HIST 345   War and society (5)
  • HIST 346   Images of War (5)
  • *PSYCH 207   Psychology.of Peace (5)
  • SIS 421   National Security and International Affairs (5)
  • WOMEN 250   Gender, War, and Peace (5)
Medicine, Self, and Society

Offered autumn 1990 - summer 1997

A multidisciplinary inquiry into the relation of medical theory and practice to society through the disciplines of literary interpretation, anthropology, philosophy, and medical history and ethics.

Required:

  • ENGL 364   Literature and Medicine (5) (formerly ENGL 409 or 408)

Plus one course from:

  • ANTH 475   Comparative Systems of Healing (5) (1990-91 only)
  • ANTH 476   Culture, Medicine and the Body (5)
  • MHE 401   Disease and Medicine in History (5)

Plus one course from:

  • MHE 440/PHIL 459   Philosophy of Medicine (5)
  • MHE 481   The Pursuit of Health in American Society (5)
Creativity, Technology, and Innovation

Offered autumn 1991 - summer 1997

Provides a framework for the critical understanding of relations between creativity and technology, for individuals and in the broader historical context of society. Considers "technology" very broadly; technology is itself a human product, deriving from creative activity and social, material organization, which then becomes a factor in further inquiry, production, and social change.

Required, three of the following courses:

  • ART H 232   Photography: Theory and Criticism (3)/ART H 499   Individual Projects (2)
  • ENGL 305   Theories of the Imagination (5) (formerly ENGL 350)
  • HIST 315   Introduction to the History of Technology (5)
  • T C 420   Introduction to Technology as a Social and Political Phenomenon (5)

Natural Sciences (The Natural World)

The Universe

Offered autumn 1988 - summer 1997

This sequence is designed to provide an understanding and appreciation of the way by which physicists and astronomers explore the scale of the universe. It seeks to make familiar the nature of quantitative reasoning and to develop an appreciation of the successes of this mode of thought in revealing and manipulating order in the physical universe.

Required courses:

  • ASTR 210   Distance and Time: Size and Age in the Universe (5)
  • ASTR 211   The Universe and Change (5)
  • ASTR 212   Life in the Universe (5)
The Physical World

Offered autumn 1988 - summer 1997

This is a comprehensive sequence designed to guide the nonscience student's thinking about the physical world. By studying familiar structures that appear in nature, including their motions and transformations, students are introduced to many of the successful ideas of classical and modem physics. The emphasis is on the approaches found most useful (e.g., symmetry, quantification, and scaling) and the history of the major ideas. High school mathematics, especially geometry, is a prerequisite.

Required courses:

  • PHYS 214   Light and Color (5)
  • PHYS 215   Order and Disorder (5)
  • PHYS 216   Time and Change (5)
Natural Science and the Environment

Offered autumn 1988 - summer 1997

Global environmental change resulting from human industrial activity is an increasingly important issue facing everyone. This sequence gives nonscience majors an understanding of the basic concepts of natural sciences as they apply to the study of the effects of industrial and agricultural practices on the atmosphere, ocean, lithosphere, and biosphere.

Required courses:

  • ENV S 203/GEOG 205   Introduction to Physical Sciences and the Environment (5)
  • ENV S 204   Introduction to the Biological Sciences and the Environment (5)
  • ENV S 307   Introduction to Global Environmental Issues (5) (formerly 207)
Biological Perspectives

Offered autumn 1989 - summer 1997

Three major points of view from which to examine a host of questions addressed by the biological sciences: the individual, the cell, and the environment. The biologist's approach to living systems, and how we know, why we know, and what we know. Laboratory experience including living material and computer simulation exercises that develop and test hypotheses.

Required courses:

  • BIOL 100   Biology: The Organism (5) autumn quarter (formerly BIOL 150)
  • BIOL 100   Biology: The Cell (5) winter quarter (formerly BIOL 151)
  • BIOL 100   Biology: Ecology and Evolution of Organisms (5) spring quarter (formerly BIOL 152)
Cognitive Science

Offered autumn 1989 - summer 1994

Philosophers think about what thought means, psychologists study how "people in general" think, anthropologists examine the interaction between culture and individual cognition, and linguists study that most unique of all human cognitive abilities, language. In addition, there is a mechanistic aspect to thought. The creation of artificial intelligence systems using modern computers has been a goal of research in computer science. Finally, neuroscientists are interested in the relationship between the organization of the brain and the capabilities of the mind. This sequence examines thinking from these different points of view.

Required:

  • PSYCH 354   Introduction to Cognitive Science (5)

Plus two courses from:

  • ANTH 358   Culture and Cognition (5)
  • CSE 415   Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (5)
  • LING 442   Introduction to Semantics (4) and LING 499   Undergraduate Research (1)
  • PHIL 464   Philosophical issues in the Cognitive Sciences (5)
Human Biology and Behavior

Offered autumn 1988 - summer 1997

Explorations of human behavior at the species level. Historical summary of views of the human species as they have developed over time and modem views of the species. Throughout the sequence, the organizing paradigm is human evolution.

Required, three of the following:

  • ANTH 220   Biological and Cultural Bases of Human Behavior (5)
  • PHY A 372   Uses and Abuses of Evolutionary Views of Human Behavior (5) and PHY A 499   Undergraduate Research (1)
  • WOMEN 453/ANTH 483   Women in Evolutionary Perspective (5)
  • ZOOL 409   Sociobiology (4)

Listed as a social science sequence in 1988-89 brochure; changed to natural science in July 1988.

Our Chemical World

Offered autumn 1990 - summer 1995

The purpose of this sequence is to give nonscience majors an understanding of the chemical basis of our world and to help prepare them to be educated citizens of an increasingly technological society.

Required, one course from:

  • CHEM 120   Chemical Science (5) (formerly CHEM 100)
  • CHEM 140/141   General Chemistry and Laboratory (4, 1)

Plus sequence 1, 2, or 3:

  1. CHEM 203   Chemistry and the Environment (5) (formerly CHEM 303)
    CHEM 205   Chemistry of Life (5) (formerly CHEM 305)
  2. CHEM 203   Chemistry and the Environment (5) (formerly CHEM 305)
    CHEM 220   General and Organic Chemistry (5) (formerly CHEM 102)
  3. CHEM 205   Chemistry of Life (5) (formerly CHEM 305)
    CHEM 150/151   General Chemistry and Laboratory (4, 1)

Credit/No Credit Grading Option

A Credit/No Credit (CR/NC) option for undergraduate students was in effect from autumn 1972 through spring 1980. Students who chose the CR/NC program took all their classes on a Credit/No Credit basis for as long as they remained in the program.

For information about current CR/NC courses see Credit/No Credit.