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Grades and Credits

The University of Washington awards numerical grades rather than letter grades. An elective pass/no-pass system called S/NS is available, although required courses may not be taken S/NS. A student may arrange to take an incomplete in a course, and, with the agreement of the instructor, has up to one year to make up the remaining work. A student may repeat a course only once, with permission; both grades are recorded and included in the grade-point average.

Students receive their grades online in MyUW, and can also view their unofficial transcript there. Starting the second week of the quarter there are a variety of restrictions on dropping and adding courses.

Numerical grades

Since summer 1976, the UW has been awarding numerical grades instead of letter grades, on a scale of 4.0 to 0.0. Thus, instead of a B, a student may receive a 3.3, or a 2.7. Consult the URL above for more information about the letter-grade equivalents of number grades. Before summer 1976, the letter grades of A, B, C, D, and E were assigned.

Satisfactory/Not Satisfactory

Satisfactory/Not-Satisfactory (S/NS) is a pass/no-pass grading option elected by students on a course-by-course basis. A grade of 2.0 or higher is converted by the Registrar to an S on the student's transcript, and a grade below 2.0 is converted to an NS on the transcript. Credit is received for an S grade, but not for an NS grade. Neither the S nor the NS is figured into the student's grade-point average.

The instructor submits a regular numerical grade for each student, and is not informed which students have elected the S/NS option for a course until the s/he receives the grade confirmation report.

If the instructor submits the student's grade before the grade deadline, the numerical grade will appear in the student's MyUW for about 24 hours. Numerical grades are converted to S/NS during the first grade run, which is usually the Tuesday after grades are due. After that time the numerical grade is not visible on the student's transcript, but remains visible on the SRF100A and SRF317 screens if it was submitted before the first grade run.

Registering for a course S/NS

Students can select the S/NS grade option when registering for a course. Students can switch from graded to S/NS, and vice versa, through the seventh week of the quarter. After the seventh week of the quarter, students are not allowed to change to or from the S/NS grade option.

Counting S/NS courses toward requirements

UW courses taken S/NS in autumn 1985 or later may not be counted toward any graduation requirement, except the total number of credits required for graduation. In other words, S/NS courses may count only as electives. They may not count toward English composition, additional writing, Q/SR, foreign language, or Areas of Knowledge requirements, and they may not count toward the requirements of a major or minor. For information about transfer courses and UW courses taken before matriculation, see below.

In Arts and Sciences majors requiring more than 50 credits, the department may choose to allow S/NS credits to count toward major requirements to the extent that the major exceeds 50 credits.

Admission deficiencies

Courses taken to remove admission deficiencies may be taken S/NS, since the restriction applies only to courses counted toward graduation requirements. Students should be cautioned, however, that courses taken to remove admission deficiencies may also count toward graduation requirements, but cannot be so used if taken S/NS.

ESL

Required English Language Program (ESL) courses may not be taken S/NS. Web registration will allow a student to select S/NS grading for an ESL course, but if a student registers for an ESL course S/NS, or changes one of the courses to S/NS grading, the course will be changed back to numerical grading.

Foreign language sequences

If a student has satisfied any foreign language graduation requirement, courses in a second foreign language (or a first language, in colleges where there is no graduation requirement) can be counted toward VLPA if the student completes at least the third quarter of the language. It is not necessary that all the courses be completed for a numerical grade, only the ones that are to be counted toward VLPA. For example, if a student completes (as a second foreign language) FRENCH 101 and 102 for numerical grades and completes FRENCH 103 with a grade of S, the student is allowed to count FRENCH 101 and 102 toward VLPA.

Note that the College of Engineering does not, in general, allow any foreign language courses below the third quarter to count toward VLPA.

Certificate programs

Whether or not courses taken S/NS can be counted toward the requirements of a certificate program is the decision of the department or other academic unit offering the program.

Prerequisite checking

A course with an encoded prerequisite or Cancellation in place may or may not accept a grade of S in the prerequisite, as determined by the department. (The default is that a grade of S is acceptable.) If a course requires a grade above 2.0 in the prerequisite, you can assume that a grade of S is not acceptable. In other cases, the student or adviser should check with the department offering the course. The information is not available on the SDB screens to which advisers have access.

Spring 2001 TA strike

Because of the teaching assistant strike in spring quarter 2001, some English composition classes were changed to CR/NC grading. Students who received a CR were allowed to use the course to satisfy the English composition requirement, where normally a numerical grade of at least 2.0 is required.

There was no special accommodation made for students who switched classes to S/NS grading in that quarter. The deadline to switch to S/NS occurred before the TA strike, although at the time of the deadline it was thought a strike was possible. There is no way for instructors to award a grade of S on the grade sheet, so no blanket S grades were issued. A student who changed to S/NS grading may not count the course toward graduation requirements. The student may petition to change the course back to a numerical grade, but the regular criteria for S/NS petitions will apply (see below).

Petitioning S/NS courses

The intent of the S/NS rules is that a student should not be able to choose between S/NS and numerical grading after knowing the course grade. There are certain circumstances, however, in which a student may be allowed to convert an S or NS grade back to the numerical grade originally awarded (See "Petitioning to count S/NS courses toward requirements" below).

It is extremely rare for a student to be allowed to convert a numerical grade to S/NS after the deadline for selecting S/NS grading, unless there is evidence of a registration error (see "Registration errors" below).

Petitioning to count S/NS courses toward requirements

A student may file a request with the Graduation and Academic Records Office to convert an S/NS grade to the numeric grade. The form can be found online at the Registrar's website, and is also available in the Graduation, Registrar, and Registration offices in Schmitz Hall. The student must attach documentation (typically, a DARS report) that demonstrates that the change request arises from one of the following situations:

  1. The course is required to satisfy a graduation requirement (for example, VLPA), and the student is close to graduation.
  2. The course is required to apply for admission to a major.

If the requirement cannot be seen on a DARS report (such as a case where the course would be allowed by exception once converted, or if the student is in a graduate program), then a letter from an appropriate adviser is required (i.e., departmental adviser if the student is declared; Undergraduate Advising, EOP, or prospective department adviser if the student is not declared).

Requests from students whose situation doesn't fall in one of the two categories listed are usually denied.

Registration errors

There are two types of S/NS errors that may be corrected:

  1. The student intended to request S/NS grading but, unrecognized by the student, the Internet transaction was not completed.
  2. The student mistakenly signed up for S/NS grading.

In both cases, the student should first contact Tina Miller in the Graduation and Academic Records Office. The Registration Office is able to determine if the student attempted to select S/NS grading but the transaction was not completed, if the attempt was made in the current quarter or the previous quarter. If the attempt can be verified, the Registration Office will change the grading option to S/NS.

The second circumstance is more difficult to verify. In general, requests are approved only if it is clear that the student was confused--for example, an international freshman who selected S/NS grading for all her courses. A supporting letter from an adviser who has worked with the student would be helpful. It is more difficult to argue that a student mistakenly registered for the S/NS option for only one course and not others taken in the same quarter.

Credit limits

A student may count a maximum of 25 UW credits earned on the S/NS grading option toward the 180 credits required for an undergraduate degree. (Transferred pass-fail courses do not count toward the 25-credit maximum.) A student is not allowed 25 S/NS credits per degree; a student who completes two simultaneous bachelor's degrees (a double degree, usually totalling 225 credits) is also allowed a total of 25 S/NS credits.

If a student earns more than 180 credits in fulfilling requirements for a 180-credit program, he/she may exceed the 25-credit maximum to the same extent. For example, a student graduating with 182 credits may present 27 credits S/NS. If a particular bachelor's degree program requires 225 credits, however, only 25 of those 225 may be taken S/NS. Likewise, if a student is seeking two bachelor's degrees, he/she may exceed 25 credits S/NS only insofar as the total number of credits exceeds the number required for the degrees (usually 225).

Postbaccalaureate students

Postbaccalaureate students may count a maximum of 25 S/NS credits toward a degree, including any UW credits earned on the S/NS grading option in the first degree.

Students on academic probation

Students on academic probation are allowed to take courses S/NS. Since S/NS courses don't affect the student's GPA, however, and students on probation need to raise their GPAs, in general such students should be encouraged to take courses for numerical grades.

Transferred courses

A student who has taken a course on a non-graded option at another school before transfer to the UW may count that course toward basic skills, breadth, and/or minor requirements. Such courses may usually be counted toward major department requirements, but the student should consult with the department adviser concerning the department's policy.

Courses taken as a nonmatriculated student

A student who has taken a course S/NS as a nonmatriculated student at the UW before his/her matriculation at the UW campus from which the student graduates may count that course toward basic skills, breadth, and/or minor requirements. Such courses may usually be counted toward major department requirements, but the student should consult with the department adviser concerning the department's policy.

S/NS and professional schools

Students planning on applying to professional schools, such as medical, dental, veterinary, or law school, should use S/NS with caution. Professional schools prefer grades to pass/fail. Also, professional schools may choose to assign grades to pass/fail courses when evaluating students' academic records. For example, a professional school might choose to translate any S grade into a 2.0, the lowest grade possible to qualify for an S, when calculating an applicant's GPA.

Law schools translate all NS (and NC) grades into 0.0 grades, which can substantially alter an applicant's GPA.

S/NS and high scholarship recognition

Eligibility for the quarterly and annual Dean's List, baccalaureate honors (cum laude, etc.), and the Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, and President's Medals is based on the number of graded UW credits completed. S/NS and CR/NC courses do not count as graded credits.

Previous S/NS rules

UW courses taken S/NS before autumn 1985 may be counted toward the basic skills or breadth (AoK) requirements. Before autumn 1985, only certain departments allowed courses in the major to be taken S/NS; students should consult the appropriate departmental adviser.

S/NS vs. CR/NC

Credit/No-Credit is an option selected by the instructor or the department, and applies to the entire course rather than to individual students. The Credit/No-Credit system is entirely separate from the student-option S/NS system. The credits for such courses are not counted against the 25-credit S/NS limit, and students are allowed to use CR/NC courses to satisfy graduation requirements.

Credit/No Credit

Some courses are offered by the faculty on a Credit/No-Credit only (CR/NC-only) basis. No student can take a CR/NC-only class for a regular grade. The instructor assigns a grade of either "CR" or "NC," neither of which is calculated into the student's grade-point average. Whether or not the student receives credit, however, the course and the grade ("CR" or "NC") are recorded on the transcript.

Some instructors may assign numerical grades to papers, exams, etc. during the quarter, but there is no University minimum in such cases for a numerical grade to be converted to CR. The instructor determines the minimum standards for CR, and submits either a CR or a NC grade.

Although courses taken under the elective pass/fail system, Satisfactory/Not Satisfactory, cannot be counted toward graduation requirements, there is no such restriction on CR/NC courses. There are also no restrictions on the number of CR/NC credits that can be taken in a single quarter, or the total number of CR/NC courses that can be counted toward a bachelor's degree.

For information on CR/NC and professional schools and high scholarship recognition see Satisfactory/Not Satisfactory.

Credit/No-Credit option

A Credit/Non-Credit (CR/NC) option for undergraduate students was in effect from autumn 1972 through spring 1980. Students who chose the CR/NC program took all their classes on a Credit/No-Credit basis for as long as they remained in the program.

Incompletes

If a student completes almost all of a course but is not able to finish the required work by the end of the quarter, s/he may arrange with the instructor to take an incomplete in the course. In most cases, the student meets with the instructor to request the incomplete (the instructor may refuse), and together the student and instructor determine how the remaining work will be made up. An “I” grade will appear on the grade report.

Normally, the remaining work for the course is completed before the end of the next quarter and the instructor submits a grade. In some instances, the instructor will ask a student to sit in on the class the following quarter in order to make up the incomplete. In such cases, the student should never reregister for the course. Instead, the instructor submits an incomplete removal form at the end of that quarter.

Incomplete makeups are added into the GPA for the quarter in which the “I” was received, not the quarter in which the work is finished. The grade is posted next to the “I,” which is not erased.

Deferral of an incomplete

The instructor may write a note to Graduation and Academic Records deferring removal of the incomplete for up to one year from the end of the quarter the incomplete was assigned; or the instructor may arrange for the “I” to be changed automatically to a specified grade if no other grade is submitted before the stated time. If the incomplete is not made up and a grade turned in by the end of the next quarter (summer excluded, even if the student attends) and no notice of deferral has been submitted, the incomplete will automatically be converted to a 0.0 in the next quarter. The instructor can change the 0.0 to a grade by submitting a change-of-grade card any time within the one-year limit.

Academic probation and incompletes

After the quarter is underway, a student will not be retroactively dropped by an incomplete removal in an earlier quarter, but a student may be retroactively put on probation.

Incompletes left at graduation

If a student receives an incomplete the quarter in which s/he graduates and the course is not needed for the degree, the incomplete does not automatically convert to a 0.0 the next quarter. If a grade is submitted, such an incomplete can be converted to a grade in the very next quarter after graduation, but if the conversion hasn’t occurred by then the incomplete will remain permanently as an “I”. If the incomplete is converted to a grade in the quarter following graduation, the grade is not added into the student’s final GPA.

The old incomplete system

Before summer 1976, a student was allowed up to two years to remove an incomplete, and an incomplete was never automatically converted to an E. Since it is now too late for any such incompletes to be converted to grades, they will remain permanently on the record as incompletes. They will never be converted to 0.0s.

X grades

An instructor may submit a grade of “X” for a student if for whatever reason the student’s grade is not available when the grades for the class are submitted. The student does not receive credit for the course until a numerical grade is turned in. Also, if an instructor has not turned in any grade by the time grade reports are printed, an “X” will be recorded until the grade is submitted. If the instructor never turns in a grade, the X remains on the transcript. The GPA is not affected and no credit is granted.

Withdrawals

Withdrawal from a course during the third through the seventh weeks of the quarter (the Late Course Drop Period, one drop/year allowed) is called the Annual Drop, and is recorded as a “W” with the week of the withdrawal also indicated; for example, “W3.” The withdrawal does not affect GPA.

If a student drops all his/her courses (withdraws for the quarter) after the second week of the quarter, the courses are listed on the transcript each with a “W” grade, and the date of the withdrawal is noted.

Course withdrawals made during Registration Periods 1, 2, 3, and the Unrestricted Drop Period are not recorded on the transcript. No withdrawals except hardship withdrawals (or complete withdrawal from the quarter) are allowed after the seventh week of the quarter.

Hardship withdrawals, when granted, are recorded with a grade of “HW.” HWs do not affect the student’s GPA.

Repeated Courses

As of autumn 1985, the Faculty Senate established the following regulation regarding the repetition of undergraduate courses:

"All grades earned at the University of Washington shall appear on the permanent record of a student and shall be included in the student's cumulative grade-point average. With the approval of the academic department offering the course, an undergraduate student may repeat a course once. Both the original and the repeat grade shall be computed into the student's GPA, but the credit hours for the repeat shall not be counted." (University of Washington Handbook, Volume 4, Part III, Chapter 15)

When a student repeats a course, both the original and the repeat grades are calculated into the student's cumulative GPA. For example, if a student receives a 1.0 in a five-credit course and then repeats the course and receives a 3.0, both grades are counted. The student ends up with the equivalent of ten credits of 2.0 in the GPA, not five credits of 2.0. Only five credits, however, count toward the 180 credits required for graduation.

What constitutes a repeat

A course registration is a repeat if the student is currently enrolled in the same course, or if the student has completed the course with one of the following grades: a numeric grade (including 0.0), Incomplete, S or NS, or CR or NC. Courses with an X, W, or W3-W7 are not counted as completed and there are no restrictions on reregistering for the course.

Departmental restrictions on repeating courses

Departments control the restrictions on the first repeat of individual courses. Each department chooses whether or not to allow repeat registration in each course in Period I, II, and III. The default is to allow repeating in all three periods. If a department chooses to deny repeats in all three Periods, a student may not repeat the course without obtaining the permission of the department. The restrictions in effect for each course are displayed on the Curriculum Inquiry screen, SRF200. For example:

RPT REG: 1:Y 2:Y 3:Y

Y means that repeat registration is allowed, N that it is not. In this example, repeat registration is allowed in Period 1, Period 2, and Period 3.

Repeat restrictions are a feature of the curriculum and may not vary from section to section of a course. Any changes must be made by the department before the beginning of Period I registration.

Overriding restrictions

Entry codes will not override a Period registration restriction set by a department; the department must use the SRF104 screen and enter an R in the override field. The R will also override any Time Schedule restrictions and prerequisites.

Multiple repeats

Before winter quarter 2005, students were not prevented from repeating a course more than once, except for a few courses that at department request were coded "no repeat registration." Starting in winter quarter 2005, no student may repeat a course more than once unless given permission by the department offering the course. (Some types of courses that are routinely repeated are exempt from this rule; see below) If a student attempts to register for a course a third time, the registration system will respond with a message that the course has been previously repeated and the student is not eligible to register for the course again. In addition, departments may further restrict repeat registration in individual courses. See Departmental restrictions, below.

Types of courses not subject to the repeat rules

Students are not restricted from repeating the following types of courses:

  • Courses numbered 500 and above
  • Courses listed with a maximum repeat credit limit (for example, "5, max. 15")
  • English Language Program courses ENGL 100 and 101
  • Variable-credit courses
  • Courses with duplicate registration allowed in the same quarter
  • Independent Study courses coded as IS
  • Courses coded as Research
  • Audited courses
Allowing additional repeats

In unusual circumstances a department may decide to allow a student to repeat a course more than once. In these situations, the department will use the SRF104 screen and enter an R in the override field. An entry code will not override the restriction. For the grade policies in multiple repeats, see below.

Grade policies

First repeats

The first time a student repeats a course, both the original and the repeat grades are calculated into the student's cumulative GPA. The two grades are not averaged together. An R is posted next to the second grade to indicate that the course has been repeated. If the student earned credit the first time the course was completed (i.e., the grade was above 0.0), no credit is earned when the course is repeated.

Additional repeats

WINTER 2005 ON: If a student is allowed to repeat a course more than once, the grade is recorded on the student's transcript but is not calculated into the student's GPA. An R is posted next to the grade to indicate that the course has been repeated. If the student previously earned credit for the course (i.e., one of the previous grades was above 0.0), no credit is earned when the course is repeated.

COURSES REPEATED BEFORE WINTER 2005: Prior to winter 2005 students were not restricted from repeating a course more than once. The grade for the second and any subsequent repeats was recorded as X and was not included in the student's grade-point average. If, however, the student had not yet received credit for the course and had now earned a passing grade, the grade was recorded as CR rather than X, and the student received credit for the course toward graduation. This change (from grade to X or CR) was made some time after grades were posted, so the grade was visible briefly on the student's online grade report in MyUW.

If the student needs to demonstrate that a repeat grade posted as X or CR was above a certain level (e.g., if a 2.0 is required for all courses in the major), the adviser may be able to locate the grade in the Student Data Base, on the SRF100A screen.

S/NS

A student repeating a course may register for the course S/NS. This will, however, have no effect on the student's GPA, since the first grade is still counted.

Transfer courses

Transferred courses repeated at the UW

If a student repeats at the UW a course previously completed at another college, the credit for the transfer course is deleted from the student's total. (It is assumed the student would prefer to have the course count toward his/her UW residence-credit total.) Following UW's policy for repeated courses, the grade for the transfer course remains in the transfer GPA.

Courses repeated before transfer

Before spring 2000, UW's repeat-course policy was applied to courses repeated at another college before transfer to the UW. The original grade and the grade for the repeat were both included in the student's transfer GPA, even if that was not the policy at the college were the course was repeated. (If the policy of the college was to erase the first grade, however, only the grade for the repeat would be included in the transfer GPA, since there is no way to know what the original grade was.)

Starting spring 2000, UW has instead followed the repeat-course policy of the college where the student repeated the course. If that college counted only the repeat grade in the student's GPA, then UW counts only the repeat grade in the student's transfer GPA. All graded attempts at the course will, however, still be listed in the transfer evaluation.

If a student takes a course at one college, then repeats it at another college, and then transfers to the UW, the first grade will be listed in the transfer evaluation but will not be included in the transfer GPA calculation.

This policy applies only to courses repeated at another college before the student matriculates at the UW. After attending the UW, the student is subject to UW's repeat-course policy. If, for example, a student takes a course at a community college, transfers to the UW, and then later returns to the community college and repeats the course there, both grades will count in the student's transfer GPA regardless of the repeat-course policy of the community college. It should be noted that the student's transfer GPA is important only for admission to the UW. Neither transfer credits nor the tranfer GPA are posted on the student's official transcript. Many UW majors with competitive admission (and all graduate and professional programs) do not rely on the UW's calculation of the student's transfer GPA and instead require that the student submit copies of all transcripts when applying for admission.

Courses that can be repeated for credit

Some UW courses can be "repeated for credit," meaning a student can take the course more than once and receive credit each time. In the catalog description of such courses, both the course's credit and the maximum credit a student can earn are indicated. For example, the credit notation "2, max. 6" means that a student can take a 2-credit course three times and receive all 6 credits. If a student enrolls in such a course past the credit maximum, the additional credit will not count toward graduation. Any additional grades earned do, however, count in the student's GPA.

DARS has been programmed to recognize any such excess credit and will list it in the "courses that do not count for credit" category. DARS can also reduce the credit in such a course if some of the credit is allowable. If, for example, a student has taken 15 credits of PSYCH 499, which has a limit of 18 credits, and registers for another 5 credits of the course, DARS will reduce the course to 3 credits and place it in a category with the notation, "The following courses have had their credit reduced because they have exceeded the maximum repeat credit allowed toward a degree."

Repeated courses and financial aid

A repeated course in which the student has already earned credit may count toward the 12 credits per quarter required for full-time financial aid, but does not count toward the 36 credits required per year. The course counts toward the 36 required credits only when the student earns credit for the course. (See above for details about when the credit is actually earned.) All students on financial aid who are considering repeating a course should discuss their options with a financial aid counselor.

Repeating courses after graduation

A student who has received a bachelor's degree may not subsequently raise his/her graduation GPA by repeating courses.

Removing incompletes

A student who receives an incomplete grade should never reregister for the course to remove the incomplete. Instead, s/he should complete the work with the original instructor, or arrange to have the original instructor submit an incomplete conversion grade. If the student does reregister, s/he will receive two grades - one for the incomplete conversion (usually a 0.0) and one for the second registration - and both will remain on the student's record and count in the student's GPA.

Professional schools and repeated courses

Medical, dental, and law schools add in all grades when computing an applicant's GPA-even grades which have been lined out. Only grades that have been erased and are therefore no longer visible are not counted. The University of Washington does not erase grades unless there was a University error, or unless the instructor submits a grade change.

SDB notations

/DR

When a student repeats a course, the notation /DR for Deduct-Repeat is posted by the second grade. The notation indicates that the grade counts in the student’s GPA but the credit is not added to the credit total—because the student has already earned credit for the same course. (If the student’s previous grade was 0.0 no notation is made, and both the credit and the grade count.)

/R

If a student enrolls in and completes a class a third time, neither the credit nor the grade counts. If the grades for the two previous attempts were both 0.0 and the student passes the course on the third try, credit is earned but the grade still does not count in the GPA.
The /R notation is also used when a student completes the first quarter of the foreign language the student took in high school to meet the UW’s admission requirement. For students in the College of Arts and Sciences, the first quarter of a student’s language of admission is considered duplication. The course and grade received are posted on the transcript, but neither the credit nor the grade counts in the student’s totals.

/D

The notation /D for Deduct is posted by the grades of courses when the grade counts in the student’s GPA but the credit does not count toward graduation. The notation is used mainly for 100- and 200-level ROTC courses taken prior to autumn 2007 and ESL courses taken summer 1993 or later.

Transcript notations

On printed transcripts, the notation /R is posted next to any repeat (1st repeat, 2nd repeat, etc.) taken winter 2005 or later, and when a student takes the first quarter of her language of admission. /DR, as defined above, only appears on printed transcripts for first repeats prior to winter 2005. /D is used on transcripts in the same way as in the SDB.

Previous policies

Pre-1983

Prior to winter 1983 students were allowed to repeat any course any number of times. If the student so requested, only the last grade received was counted in the GPA; all earlier grades were still visible on the transcript, but were lined out with a diagonal line. Students could not use an earlier grade to line out a more recent grade. Grades of "S" or "CR" could be used to line out earlier grades, but the following grades could not be used: W, *W, HW, PW, I, NS, NC, N, or X.

This policy went into effect summer 1971 and was retroactive. Students who repeated a course before winter 1983 may still request to use that grade to line out earlier grades.

Winter 1983 through summer 1985

From winter 1983 through summer 1985 the following policy was in effect: "All grades earned at the University of Washington will appear on the permanent record of a student and will be included in the student's cumulative grade-point average. An undergraduate student has the right to repeat a course once, and only if the original grade was lower than a 2.0. A department or program requiring its students to achieve a grade level above 2.0 may request approval from the Faculty Council on Academic Standards for exceptional arrangements. Both the original and the repeat grade will be computed into the student's GPA, but the credit hours for the repeat will not be counted."

Grade reports

Students obtain their grades online in MyUW. 

Graded Credits Attempted is the number of credits used to calculate the quarterly grade-point average. This figure will often differ from Total Credits Earned, as some courses count toward graduation but not toward the grade-point average, or vice-versa.

Grade Points Earned is obtained by multiplying the number of credits for each class by the grade received. Thus, for GERMAN 103 , 5 credits times a grade of 3.7 yields 18.5 grade points.

Grade Point Average is obtained by dividing the grade points by the graded credits attempted. 

In this way the grades for each course are weighted, so that a 4.0 in a 5-credit course affects the GPA more than a 4.0 in a 2-credit course.

The Cumulative Summary, Graded Credits Attempted, Grade Points Earned, and Grade Point Average include only UW credits.

Low Scholarship

Warning

Any undergraduate student whose GPA for his/her first quarter at the University is below 2.00 receives an academic warning. If s/he does not raise the cumulative GPA to at least 2.00 by the end of the next quarter in residence, s/he is placed on academic probation.

Probation

An undergraduate student will be placed on academic probation at the end of any quarter in which his/her cumulative GPA falls below 2.00 (unless it is his/her first quarter at the University, in which case only a "warning" is given). Once on probation, the student must attain at least a 2.50 average each succeeding quarter that s/he receives any numerical grades until the cumulative GPA is raised to a 2.00, or s/he will be dropped for low scholarship. If the grades for a quarter raise the cumulative GPA to 2.00, the student is off probation and the GPA for that quarter does not have to be a 2.50.

A student on probation is not required to carry a particular number of credits. S/he may drop classes or withdraw from the quarter within the same time periods as other students.

Drop

Each student dropped for low scholarship is notified by email when grades are posted at the end of the quarter. Before the student's registration for the next quarter is cancelled, some time is allowed for late grades and grade changes to be posted. If any such changes are enough to move the student from drop to probation or off probation (or if the student is reinstated; see below) and the changes are processed by the Graduation and Academic Records office before the cancellation date, the student's program for the next quarter is not cancelled. If the changes or reinstatement are received after the deadline, the student must re-register.

Cancellation schedule

Next-quarter programs of dropped students are usually cancelled according to the following schedule:

quarter droppednext-quarter program cancelled
autumn8 p.m. on the third class day of winter quarter
winter8 p.m. on the third class day of spring quarter
spring
  • If the student registered for summer quarter, both the student's summer and autumn programs are cancelled at 5 p.m. on the third class day of summer quarter.If the student registered for autumn but not for summer, the autumn quarter program is cancelled after summer quarter, in August.
summer8 p.m. on the third class day of autumn quarter
Temporary reinstatement

From the time the student is placed on drop status until programs are cancelled, the student remains registered for courses for the next quarter but a registration hold has been placed, so the student is not able to drop or add courses. During this period a reinstatement counselor may do a temporary reinstatement so that the student can make recommendated changes in his/her class schedule. If the student is subsequently reinstated by the adviser or the committee, the reinstatement is left in place. If the student's petition is denied, the temporary reinstatement is removed and the student is placed back on drop status.

Reinstatement

A student is readmitted at the discretion of the dean of the school or college to which readmission is sought.

Arts and Sciences

In the College of Arts and Sciences, the student must first meet with a reinstatement counselor in the Undergraduate Advising Office. EOP students should meet with a counselor in the Office of Minority Affairs.

Other colleges

Reinstatement policies of other schools and colleges may differ. A student dropped from a college other than Arts and Sciences should talk with his/her department or college adviser for information on how to petition for reinstatement. A student dropped from any undergraduate college of the University may petition the College of Arts and Sciences for reinstatement as a premajor.

Nonmatriculated students

Nonmatriculated students may be reinstated by the College of Arts and Sciences or by UW Educational Outreach.

Student athletes

A special low-scholarship policy, in effect for student athletes who entered the UW in autumn 1990 or later, affects the eligibility for competition of student athletes who have been dropped and reinstated more than once. Upon the second (or any later) reinstatement, the student will be ineligible for competition in intercollegiate athletics for the quarter in which the reinstatement is granted, and will remain ineligible until either a cumulative 2.00 GPA is achieved or the student achieves at least a 2.50 quarterly GPA at the UW in at least 10 credits (or 6 credits during summer quarter).

Petitioning for reinstatement in the College of Arts and Sciences

Students petitioning for reinstatement in the College of Arts and Sciences are required to meet with an academic counselor at the Undergraduate Advising Office. EOP students should meet with a counselor at the Office of Minority Affairs. If the student cannot come to campus a telephone appointment can be arranged. Petitions from students who have not talked with a reinstatement counselor will not be considered.

The adviser will discuss with the student any reasons behind his/her poor academic performance, and will attempt to determine why the student expects to be more successful if reinstated. In some cases the adviser may reinstate the student, in other cases a written petition is sent to a committee composed of UA and EOP advisers and a departmental representative. In other cases the student is not encouraged to petition but rather to attend a community college or remain out of school for a period before trying to reenter the UW.

The petition

All students seeking immediate reinstatement are required to prepare a petition, detailing the reasons for their academic difficulty and the steps they have taken to correct the situation. The petition should be prepared after the student meets with a counselor.

The petition is a personal statement in which the student analyzes the barriers to his or her academic success and, most important, details the behavior the student has changed or will change to ensure future academic success and lists the specific steps that will be taken. Promises to "change" and "do better" are not sufficient.

The student must prepare an academic plan, listing proposed courses for the next academic year. Students with more than 135 credits should include a graduation plan signed by their departmental adviser. Other input from departmental advisers is welcome.

Transcripts from other colleges attended since the student was dropped from the UW, including the student's current class schedule, must be presented. Other documentation may also be included, such as current hardship withdrawal petitions and letters from instructors concerning upcoming grade changes or incomplete removals.

Factors influencing reinstatement

Although each student's situation is considered on an individual basis, in Arts and Sciences the advisers follow general guidelines in determining which students are reinstated. Students who have performed well at another college after leaving the UW are most likely to be reinstated. Students who have taken specific steps to change harmful behaviors, and students who are close to graduation and whose reinstatements are supported by their departmental advisers, are also more likely to be reinstated.

Students in the following situations are usually denied reinstatement and required to spend time away from the University before petitioning again.

  • The student's worst grades are in his/her intended major, and the student refuses to consider other majors.
  • A reinstated student's GPA drops even lower after the reinstatement.
  • A reinstated student failed to follow through on commitments made during a previous reinstatement. For example, the student failed to petition for hardship withdrawals, or make up incompletes, or take the agreed-upon class schedule.

Reenrollment

A student who is reinstated for the quarter immediately following the drop quarter can be reinstated by an Undergraduate Advising or EOP counselor using SRF608. A student who has been out one or more quarters must submit an approved reinstatement petition and, if necessary, a returning student reenrollment application at 225 Schmitz Hall. The student does not need to file a returning student reenrollment application if s/he is being reinstated for one of the two quarters immediately after the drop, not including summer quarter. For example, if a student is dropped at the end of spring quarter and is reinstated for the following winter quarter, s/he may register for winter quarter using web registration, like any other student who completed spring quarter.

A student readmitted after being dropped re-enters on academic probation. The student may not use grades from other colleges or universities or grades from extension or correspondence courses to raise his/her UW GPA.

Since students are reinstated on probation, the conditions described under "Probation" above must be met; i.e., a student must in the first quarter either attain a minimum 2.00 cumulative GPA for all courses taken in residence at the UW or attain a 2.50 GPA for courses taken that quarter. A student in the latter category will be continued on probation each quarter, so long as his/her quarterly GPA is at least a 2.50. When such a student's cumulative UW GPA reaches at least 2.00, s/he will be removed from probation.

Grade policies

Grade changes

If an instructor agrees to change a student's grade, recalculation of the student's GPA for that quarter and subsequent quarters may retroactively remove the student from warning, probation, and/or drop status. If it does, the low scholarship notations on the transcript will be erased or changed to reflect the student's new status.

Incomplete removals

Since incomplete removal grades are posted in the quarter that the incomplete was incurred, an incomplete removal may retroactively raise or lower a student's GPA. No student will be retroactively dropped by an incomplete removal, but a student may be retroactively put on probation. When this occurs during the quarter, the student must meet the minimum requirements for students on academic probation (see above) that same quarter, or s/he will be dropped. The intention of this policy is to prevent students from avoiding probation and drop by requesting incompletes in courses where a low grade would otherwise be posted-and is posted eventually.

Repeated courses

No special policies apply to low scholarship students.

S/NS

Students on low scholarship are allowed to register for courses S/NS. Since only numerical grades will raise a student's GPA and allow the student to get off probation, however, students on probation should be discouraged from selecting the S/NS grade option.

UW courses may not be taken while on drop status

A UW student on drop status may not take UW courses as a nonmatriculated student; s/he must be reinstated before taking any UW courses.

In the past, dropped students were allowed to continue to take UW courses on a space-available basis as a nonmatriculated student. Then, the student followed the regular procedure for nonmatriculated student registration (i.e., registering through UW Extension and obtaining the instructor's and department chair's signatures for each course). Any UW credit courses taken by a student on drop status were posted on the student's transcript as extension credit, not residence credit, and did not affect the student's UW GPA.

Transcripts

Warning, probation, and drop notations appear only on unofficial transcripts. Low scholarship notations do not appear on official UW transcripts.

Dean's List and Baccalaureate Honors

The following forms of recognition are awarded to first-baccalaureate degree, matriculated students in residence at the UW. Undergraduate students in all colleges of the University are eligible.

Note that courses taken S/NS or CR/NC do NOT count as graded credits toward the requirements of each honor.      

Quarterly Dean's List

A high scholarship notation is made on the transcript of each undergraduate student who attains a quarterly GPA of at least 3.50 for 12 UW graded credits. "Dean's List" is entered on official and unofficial UW transcripts.

A list of the students on the current quarter's Dean's List at each UW campus is available online.      

Annual Dean's List

The following undergraduates receive yearly high scholarship recognition:

  • Undergraduates who have attended three quarters of the academic year (summer through spring) and who have achieved a cumulative GPA of 3.50 or higher in at least 12 graded credits in each of the three quarters.
  • Undergraduates who have attended the University for four quarters of the school year (summer through spring), with a 3.50 or higher GPA in 12 or more graded credits in each of three quarters, and a 3.50 or higher GPA in 10 or more graded credits in the fourth quarter.

Such students are recognized by the notation "Annual Dean's List" on official and unofficial UW transcripts following the last quarter's grades for the year, and by a certificate of recognition from the dean of the student's home school or college.      

Baccalaureate Honors

Baccalaureate honors (cum laude, magna cum laude, summa cum laude) are awarded only to recipients of a first bachelor's degree. Cum laude means "with praise," magna cum laude means "with great praise," and summa cum laude means "with highest praise."

These honors are earned by students who have completed at least 90 residence credits at the UW campus granting the degree. At least 60 of the 90 credits must be graded credits (see Pass/fail, below). Credits earned by advanced placement (AP) credit, other types of extension credit, credits from other UW campuses, and transfer credit are not counted toward the 90 credit total. Distance Learning courses (those that include a DL prefix) are included in the UW cumulative GPA and therefore count toward baccalaureate honors.

All graduates earning baccalaureate honors are given a gold honor cord to wear in the Commencement ceremony. For students graduating in spring quarter, the honors listed in the commencement program, as well as honor cord distribution, are based upon a student's cumulative GPA as of the winter quarter, since spring grades are not available for this determination. Spring classes are ultimately included in the credit totals and GPA calculations for honors posted to the student's final record.

Each October the University's Faculty Council on Academic Standards determines the grade-point requirement for each baccalaureate honor in each college of the University for students graduating in the current academic year. The top 0.5% of graduating students in each college are awarded summa cum laude, the next 3% are awarded magna cum laude, and the next 6.5% are awarded cum laude. For an archive of current and past minimum GPAs for each honor (cum laude, magna cum laude, summa cum laude), see Baccalaureate Honor GPA Requirements.      

Medals

Selection of medalists is based primarily on GPA, but the rigor and quality of the student's program are also considered.

Freshman Medal

The Freshman Medal is awarded to the sophomore having the highest scholastic standing for the first year of his/her coursework. To be eligible, students must have completed at least 36 graded credits in residence at UW-Seattle. The notation "Freshman Medalist" is made on the transcript.

Sophomore Medal

The Sophomore Medal is awarded to the junior having the highest scholastic standing for the first two years of his/her coursework. To be eligible, students must have completed at least 40 credits in residence at UW-Seattle. The notation "Sophomore Medalist" is made on the transcript.

Junior Medal

The Junior Medal is awarded to the senior having the highest scholastic standing for the first three years of his/her coursework. To be eligible, students must have completed at least 40 credits in residence at UW-Seattle. The notation "Junior Medalist" is made on the transcript.

President's Medal

The President's Medal, which is conferred at Commencement, recognizes the graduating senior who has the most distinguished academic record. In addition to the criteria used for the other medals, candidates for this award submit letters and the committee discusses the candidates with their home departments. Only students who have earned at least 90 credits in residence at UW-Seattle may be considered. The notation "President's Medalist" is made on the transcript, under the name of the degree awarded.      

Pass-fail

Note that the honors described above are based on graded credits. Courses taken S/NS, and courses offered CR/NC, do not count as graded credits and will not be included in the credit totals necessary to qualify for honors.

Honorary Societies

Students with distinguished academic records may participate in several University-wide honorary societies.

There are other honorary societies open to students in specific colleges and departments. Information about these societies is available on the college and department home pages.

Golden Key National Honor Society

Golden Key is a national, nonprofit academic honors organization founded in 1977 for the purpose of recognizing and encouraging scholastic achievement among students from all academic fields. Membership is by invitation only, based on GPA. Every year, Golden Key invites the top 15% college juniors and seniors to join the Society. There are currently 700-800 members from all majors in the UW chapter.

UW's Golden Key chapter is committed to providing services of good will and charity for both the University and the surrounding communities. The chapter sponsors lecture series and workshops to provide crucial (or fun) information and skills to college students. Off campus, they coordinate community services to benefit underserved populations.

Mortar Board

Mortar Board is a national college senior honor society whose membership is based on scholarship, leadership, and service. The local Tolo chapter was founded in 1909 and became part of the national organization in 1925. Students of junior standing apply winter quarter for selection in spring quarter.

Phi Beta Kappa

Phi Beta Kappa is the nation's oldest and most prestigious collegiate honor society, founded in 1776, with the Washington Alpha Chapter established in 1914. Phi Beta Kappa recognizes distinguished scholarship, especially in the acquisition of an education in the liberal arts and sciences. Students are elected to membership on the basis of GPA and breadth of education. For the 2006-2007 academic year, the minimum GPA for invitation was 3.75; 171 University of Washington students became new members of the UW chapter in 2005-2006. One distinctive requirement of Phi Beta Kappa is the completion of eight credits in 300- or 400-level courses of a liberal arts nature, not closely related to the student's major. The Washington Alpha Chapter hosts occasional lectures and colloquia.

Phi Eta Sigma

Phi Eta Sigma is a freshman honor society, dedicated to honoring outstanding scholars and their academic achievements. In addition to personal recognition, Phi Eta Sigma's activities include service projects within the community. To qualify for admission, a student must attain a 3.50 quarterly GPA sometime in the freshman year. Members are required to participate in at least one community service activity each quarter in the year that they join. PES also schedules social events so that members can get to know one another.

Tau Sigma

Tau Sigma is a national honor society for transfer students. Transfer students who receive a 3.5 or are in the top 20% of their class their first quarter at the UW are eligible to join. The mission of the honorary is for members to serve as advocates for other transfer students on campus, serve as possible ambassadors for the UW by visiting community colleges, and serve in leadership positions such as Orientation Leaders and TRIG Peer Instructors.

Other honoraries

While other national honoraries exist, students should investigate them before deciding to pay money to join them. Some honoraries are basically money-making schemes for the people who set them up. Students should be cautious about any honorary whose main benefit is including names in a publication. The real benefits students gain from any honorary come not from simply being able to list membership but from participating in community service and campus activities, and the leadership experience students can gain from being an active officer of the local chapter.

Types of Credit

The chart below indicates how different types of credit count toward the matriculation and residence requirements, and which credits are included in the UW GPA. A matriculated undergraduate student is one who has been admitted to a UW school or college as a premajor or a declared major.

 counts as matriculated credit (if taken after student matriculates)included in UW GPAcounts as residence credit at the campus granting the degree
Regular courses (excluding DL-prefix) offered at the student's home campusyesyesyes
Courses taken at a UW campus other than the one granting the degree (Seattle, Bothell, Tacoma)yesyesno
Foreign study recorded as UW credityesyesyes
Foreign study recorded as transfer creditnonono
* Credit courses offered by UW Extension, taken by a matriculated student in good academic standingyesyesyes
C-prefix distance learning (no longer offered)yesnono
DL-prefix distance learningyesyesno
UW courses taken as a nonmatriculated student (i.e., before the student matriculates)noyes, except C-prefix distance learning and College in the High Schoolyes
** UW-sponsored College in the High Schoolnonono
Transfer coursesnonono
*** Extensionnonono

* Credit courses offered by UW Extension (formerly TA, TB, etc. sections). Does not include C-prefix (no longer offered) or DL-prefix distance learning, or College in the High School.

** UW-sponsored College in the High School is administered by UW Extension. UW also accepts College in the High School from other colleges, as long as the coursework is submitted on a college transcript and meets our regular transfer credit restrictions. While UW-sponsored College in the High School is recorded on the UW transcript as extension credit, College in the High School sponsored by other colleges may be recorded either as extension credit or as transfer credit.

*** Includes AP and International Baccalaureate, advanced placement, credit-by-exam, College in the High School, Armed Forces Training School, and all transfer extension.

Credit Limit per Quarter

Students are limited to a maximum of 19 credits during Period 1 and 2 registration. The intent of the limit is to make registration fairer for the students whose priority requires them to register last. No student will be able to sign up for a heavy credit load until everyone has had a chance to request a normal load.

The 19-credit limit does not include self-sustaining courses, UW Educational Outreach courses that have a separate fee and are not covered by tuition. Self-sustaining courses include UW Extension, UW online learning (DL and C), the Academic English Program (ENGL 100 and 101 ESL courses), and Early Fall Start. A student may enroll in 19 credits plus any number of these credits.

MATH 098 is also not included in the 19-credit limit, because it is a zero-credit course.

Starting on the first day of the quarter, any student may add courses up to a limit of 30 credits. No special permission is required. Additional tuition is charged for each credit over 18. The 30-credit limit does not include self-sustaining courses or MATH 098; see above.

Advanced Placement

The College Board's Advanced Placement Program gives students the opportunity to take college-level courses while still in high school. A participating high school offers one or more CB Advanced Placement courses in topics such as calculus, English composition, European history, and French. Students who complete a course may pay a fee and take the Advanced Placement examination. Students' scores in these exams, which range from a high of AP-5 to a low of AP-1, are sent to the colleges or universities to which they are applying for admission.

Further information about the College Board Advanced Placement program is available at their website.

Submitting scores

The Admissions Office accepts AP scores sent directly from the College Board. If the student didn't list UW as a recipient college when taking the exam, the student can ask to have scores sent to the UW at the College Board website.

UW locates a student's scores using the student's social security number. If the student didn't provide a SSN when taking the exam, the UW probably has the score but the student or an adviser needs to notify the Office of Admissions that the score is there.

Placement and/or credit

The relevant UW department determines whether the student will receive:

  • Advanced placement (i.e., exemption from courses) but no credit, or
  • Advanced placement and credit, or
  • Credit only.

In some cases the student must consult directly with the departmental adviser to receive credit and/or advanced placement. In other cases (i.e., when specific courses are shown in the list below) the student will automatically receive credit and need not see the departmental adviser.

Total credits allowed

AP credit awards are recorded on a student's UW transcript as extension credit. A maximum of 90 extension credits may count toward a bachelor's degree. See Residence Credit Requirement for more information about extension credit.

Transfer students

Before autumn 1999, AP credit was awarded according to the policy at UW, regardless of the amount of credit awarded elsewhere.

The UW now accepts credit awarded by another college for College Board AP scores of 3 or higher, even if the UW would not have granted credit for the score. All such credit transfers as UW 999, 998, etc. In addition to an official transcript showing the credit awarded by the other college, the student must submit an official copy of the AP score. (A record of the score on a transcript from the other college is not sufficient.)

Such credit is transferred only if it is in excess of the credit that the UW awards for the student's AP score. For example, a student with an AP score of 4 in European History would be awarded 5 credits for HIST 113 by the UW. If the student's previous college awarded 10 credits, the student would be allowed 5 credits of UW 999 plus 5 credits of HIST 113 awarded by the UW.

This policy applies only to students who receive the AP credit from another college before the student ever attends the UW. It does not apply, for example, to a student who (1) attends the UW, then (2) transfers to another college which grants the student additional credit for his/her AP scores, then (3) returns to the UW. Such a student would not be awarded the additional AP credit.

Counting transferred AP credit toward requirements

AP UW 999 credit awarded for a score on the English language or English literature exam counts only as elective credit; it does not count toward the English composition requirement, the additional writing requirement, or Areas of Knowledge.

AP UW 999 credit in calculus cannot be used for placement into a UW math course, but can count toward the Q/SR and/or Natural World requirements.

AP UW 999 credit in a foreign language does not by itself satisfy the Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement, and may not be used for placement into a UW foreign language course. The credit can otherwise be treated as if it is at the level of the third quarter of the language; that is, the credit can count toward VLPA unless it is the same language that the student is using to satisfy the Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement.

UW 999 credit in other subjects may be counted toward the appropriate Area of Knowledge, as determined by an adviser.

In all cases, a DARS exception will be necessary if the 999 credit is to count toward a requirement.

The current transfer policy is retroactive.

The Admissions Office will accept additional credit granted for AP scores for students who entered the UW before autumn 1999 if the situation is brought to their attention. If the student has not already done so, s/he must provide an official transcript showing the credit awarded by the other college, and an official copy of the AP score.

Department policies

For the current policies of various Arts and Sciences departments regarding exemption from courses and awarding of Advanced Placement credit, see AP Credit Policies.

Previous award policies

UW's current AP awards may be more generous than earlier awards in the same subject. When this is the case, the student is allowed the current award regardless of what the award was when the student took the AP exam or when the student was admitted to the UW. If a student doesn't have the current award posted contact the Office of Admissions. EXCEPTION: English AP awards are an exception. The English awards have changed several times in the past 20 years, and students with old scores are NOT allowed to claim the current award. Consult the table below for English AP awards.

ExaminationAP scoreCourse(s) and creditsCounts towardComments
Students admitted summer 2008 or later
English language & composition4 or 5ENGL 190 (5 credits)VLPANOTE: ENGL 190 & 191 are not in the UW curriculum. These numbers were created only for English AP credit.
English literature & composition4 or 5ENGL 191 (5 credits)VLPA
Students admitted summer 2003 through spring 2008
English language4 or 5ENGL 109 (5 credits)VLPA 
English literature4 or 5ENGL 109 (5 credits)VLPA
Both tests4 or 5ENGL 109 (10 credits)VLPANOTE: There is no ENGL 109 in the UW curriculum. This number was created only for English AP credit.
Students admitted summer 1999 though spring 2003
English language4 or 5ENGL 111 (5 credits)English composition 
English literature4 or 5ENGL 111 (5 credits)English composition
Both tests4 or 5ENGL 111, 131 (10 credits)English composition
Students admitted autumn 1986 through spring 1999
English language3, 4, 5ENGL 111 (5 credits)English composition 
English literature3, 4, 5ENGL 111 (5 credits)English composition
Both tests3, 4, 5ENGL 111, 131 (10 credits)English composition
Students admitted spring 1985-summer 1986
Language and composition5ENGL 111, 131 (or 181) (10 credits)English composition 
4ENGL 111, 171 (8 credits)English composition
3ENGL 111 (5 credits)English composition
Composition and literature5ENGL 111, 131 (or 181) (10 credits)English composition
4ENGL 111, 171 (8 credits)English composition
3ENGL 111 (5 credits)English composition
Students admitted before spring 1985
Language and composition5ENGL 111, 131 (or 181) (10 credits)English composition 
4ENGL 111, 171 (8 credits)English composition
3ENGL 111 (5 credits)English composition
Composition and literature5ENGL 111, 131 (or 181) (10 credits)English composition
4ENGL 111, 171 (8 credits)English composition
3ENGL 171 (3 credits)English composition

FCAS Guidelines on AP, IB, and Satisfactory Progress

In May 2011, the Faculty Council on Academic Standards (FCAS) adopted new guidelines for how AP and International Baccalaureate (IB) credits should impact satisfactory progress decisions (e.g., granting pre-major extensions, admitting to majors, and approving graduation plans that extend beyond the 210-credit limit). Those guidelines are available on the FCAS website (pdf).

International Baccalaureate

The International Baccalaureate program is similar to the College Board Advanced Placement program. It is called "international" because it is available to students in several countries, not because it is in any way an international experience. After completing a specially designed high school course, students take either Higher Level examinations or Standard (formerly Subsidiary) examinations. The UW grants credit for Higher Level exams only.

In the distant past the UW allowed only students who had earned an IB diploma to receive any credit for IB exams. Currently we grant credit for each individual Higher Level subject exam passed, if the UW department involved has given its approval.

Submitting scores

The Admissions Office accepts IB scores sent directly from the International Baccalaureate Organization. The scores will be sent automatically if the student listed the UW as a recipient when registering for the IB exam(s). To have a score sent to the UW after taking the exam, the student should contact the IB Organization at transcripts.ibna@ibo.org

Credit awarded for the IB diploma

Students earning an IB diploma July 2004 or later will be awarded 15 general education credits distributed equally among the three general education areas: Individuals and Societies (I&S), the Natural World (NW), and Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts (VLPA). These will be posted as extension credit as follows:

   UW 111   IB I&S   5 credits
   UW 112   IB NW   5 credits
   UW 113   IB VLPA   5 credits

This policy will apply to students who graduated from high school in June 2004 or later. Diplomas are awarded in July. This policy is not retroactive.

Credit awarded for subject exams

In most cases, credit is awarded for scores of 5 or higher on Higher Level subject exams. The UW does not award credit for Standard Level examinations. Advisers should always use caution when discussing credit awards with students and be certain that the student took Higher Level exams. For credit awards for students who matriculated at the UW in summer 2003 or later, or sent IB scores in July 2003 or later, see the IB Credit Table.

Credit awarded for IB scores before 2003

UW's awards for IB exams changed in summer 2003. Students who matriculated at the UW before summer 2003, and students who submitted IB scores before summer 2003, receive the old IB awards described below.

A student with a pre-2003 Higher Level exam score of 5, 6, or 7 receives 5 "999" credits in that department (for example, 5 credits of HSTAA 999). Exceptions are as follows:

Art/Design  No credit; see art adviser for placement.
Biology  Credit varies; see biology adviser.
Chemistry  No credit; see chemistry adviser for possible exemption from coursework.
Computing Studies  UW 999 (5 credits)
Economics  No credit; see economics adviser for placement.
Mathematics  Several exams; most receive MATH 999 credit. Mathematics and Computing receives UW 999 credit. A mathematics IB score cannot be used for placement.
Music  Credit varies; see music adviser.
Organization and Management Studies  BA 999 (5 credits)
Physical Science  UW 999 (5 credits)
Physics  No credit; see physics adviser for possible exemption from coursework.
Counting old IB credit toward requirements

Pre-2003 IB credit awards may be treated as X credit; that is, an adviser can determine how the courses count toward basic skills or Areas of Knowledge requirements, within the restrictions below.

ENGLISH: Pre-2003 English IB credits may be counted toward either (a) the English composition requirement, or (b) the additional writing and VLPA requirements. DARS counts the credit as English composition. If the student prefers to count the course as VLPA and W, the adviser should made a DARS exception or send the request todars@u.washington.edu

MATHEMATICS: Pre-2003 Math IB credits may be counted toward the Q/SR requirement and/or they may count toward Natural World. They cannot be used to meet the prerequisite or placement-test requirements of any UW math course.

A student with IB credit but no college credit in math must take a placement test.

FOREIGN LANGUAGES: Pre-2003 Foreign language IB credits are at the second-year level. They satisfy the foreign language requirement, and can simultaneously count toward VLPA. They cannot, however, be used to meet the prerequisite or placement-test requirements of most UW foreign languages. Students with IB credit who wish to continue the language should contact the department offering the language to determine if a placement test will be required.

FCAS Guideslines on AP, IB, and Satisfactory Progress

In May 2011, the Faculty Council on Academic Standards (FCAS) adopted new guidelines for how Advanced Placement (AP) and IB credits should impact satisfactory progress decisions (e.g., granting pre-major extensions, admitting to majors, and approving graduation plans that extend beyond the 210-credit limit). Those guidelines are available on the FCAS website (pdf).

Advanced Placement Credit Based on Completion of Advanced Courses

The term "advanced placement" is sometimes confusing because it is used to describe different ways of earning credit without taking college courses. One way is for a high school student complete a specialized high school course that culminates in an advanced placement exam in the subject. Based on the student's score in the exam, the UW department offering the subject determines what, if any, advanced placement credits the student may be allowed. Any credits allowed are automatically placed on the transcript; no action by the student is required. See College Board Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate.

Another way is for the student to begin his/her college study in certain subjects at an advanced level, so that, upon successful completion of the advanced course, the UW will grant credit not only for that course, but for certain more elementary courses in the same field as well. Further details about this way of earning AP credit are noted below.

In order to receive this second kind of advanced placement credit, the student must request the credit by contacting the Graduation and Academic Records Office, 264 Schmitz Hall. This kind of credit is also available to students who receive transfer credit for advanced courses; in cases where there is doubt as to how much credit the student is to receive, the UW department concerned may be asked to make a determination.

Advanced placement credit granted by the UW

Foreign languages

Awarding of advanced placement credit for students entering the University autumn 1967, or after, is as follows:

A student who begins college study in a foreign language with the sixth-quarter course of a two-year University language sequence will, upon successful completion of that course, be awarded University credit for the fifth-quarter course as well. (A student, for example, who begins with and successfully completes GERMAN 203 will be awarded five credits of advanced placement credit for GERMAN 202.) Similarly, the student whose high school study has brought him/her to the level of completion of the second year of University study will, upon successful completion of any upper-division course (except conversation courses), be awarded University credit for the fifth- and sixth-quarter courses. (Thus, a student who, on the basis of high school study, places at the 300 level in Spanish, and who then successfully completes an upper-division Spanish course, will be granted advanced placement credit for SPAN 202 and 203 as well.) Advanced placement credit of this kind is not awarded for the first four quarters (e.g., GERMAN or SPAN 101, 102, 103, 201).

Although advanced placement credit is awarded for beginning college study at an advanced level, it is not awarded for skipping courses; i.e., credit is awarded only if the student has not previously completed any college courses for credit in the language in question. (For example, a student who skips directly from GERMAN 201 into German 203 does not receive advanced placement credit for GERMAN 202. On the other hand, earning College Board AP credit is not the same as taking a college course; thus a student who receives credit for GERMAN 201 because he/she has an AP score of 3 does receive UW AP credit for 202 if his/her first college German course is 203.)

NATIVE SPEAKERS: Native speakers of a language other than English are not awarded any advanced placement credits in their native language, regardless of the level at which they begin their study of the language in college. According to the University's official definition, a student is a native speaker of "the language, or one of the languages, which was spoken in the student's home during the first six years of his/her life and in which he/she received instruction in school through the seventh grade." Therefore, students who immigrated to the United States and began attending English-speaking schools before the end of the seventh grade are eligible for advanced-placement credit in their original home language.

Mathematics

A student who begins college study of mathematics with MATH 125 will, upon successful completion of that course, receive advanced placement credit for MATH 124. (If a student withdraws from MATH 124 after the second week of a quarter, however, and then takes MATH 125, that student will not receive advanced placement credit for MATH 124.) A student who begins college study of mathematics with MATH 126 will, upon successful completion of that course, receive advanced placement credit for MATH 124 and MATH 125. The student should request the credit at the Graduation and Academic Records Office.

A student who has received advanced placement credits for MATH 124 and MATH 125 cannot receive additional credit by taking MATH 134 or MATH 135.

A student who begins college study of mathematics with MATH 134 will, upon successful completion of that course, receive advanced placement credit for MATH 124. A student who also successfully completes MATH 135 will receive additional advanced placement credit for MATH 125.

The advanced placement credit referred to in the preceding paragraphs is awarded only if the student has not previously completed any college courses for credit in mathematics.

Lower-Division Transfer Credits

Beginning in winter 2005, the rules for transferring credits into the UW changed.

Prior to 2005, students could use a maximum of 90 credits from a 2-year college toward their UW degree. The number of credits from a 4-year university was essentially unrestricted, although then, as now, students still had to meet the matriculation requirement and the UW residence-credit requirement in order to graduate.

In 2004, the Washington state legislature passed a bill requiring Washington public baccalaureate institutions to treat lower-division (i.e., 100- and 200-level) transfer credit from 2-year colleges the same way they treat lower-division transfer credit from 4-year universities. In response, the UW instituted a new policy that changed several things about how transfer credits can be used at the UW. In short, it shifts the 90 credit limitation from a focus on "2-year vs. 4-year" credit to "lower-division vs. upper division" credit, it caps all transfer credit (lower-division + upper-division) at 135, and it allows for the possibility of counting more than 90 lower-division transfer credits toward graduation.

The 2005 policy

  1. Upon matriculation to the UW, students may count no more than 90 lower-division transfer credits, whether from 2-year or 4-year schools, toward the 180 credits required for graduation.
  2. However, additional credits may be allowed when ALL of the following are true:
    • the student requests additional credits (i.e., it doesn't happen automatically)
    • the additional credits will advance the student toward a degree (i.e., the credits are necessary)
    • the additional credits are approved by the student's academic unit (see Approving additional lower-division transfer credits, below).
  3. No more than 135 (lower-division + upper division) may be accepted in transfer for a bachelor's degree.

Things to note when applying this policy

When the additional lower-division transfer credits may be taken

There is no restriction on when the credits may be taken, except with regard to the final year residence-credit requirement (see next section). So, additional lower division credits may be taken at any regionally accredited college, including a community college, before or after matriculation to the UW. Students sometimes return to a community college after matriculation in order to fulfill requirements (e.g., attending a community college in their final summer to fulfill the foreign language requirement); the difference under the new rule is that the student can request that these courses count for credit as well as for fulfilling the course requirement.

The final year residence-credit requirement

Students must still take 45 of their last 60 credits in residence at the UW, so, just as under the old rule, students must be careful how many additional lower-division transfer credits they take and transfer in toward the end of their degree. However, if students are merely applying additional lower-division transfer credits that they took before transferring to the UW, then these credits should not fall within the final 45. That is, with respect to the final year residence-credit requirements, additional lower-division transfer credits count in the quarter they were taken, not in the quarter the request is approved.

4-year transfers with many accumulated credits

Transfer students from 4-year institutions are also limited to 90 lower-division transfer credits, and can use no more than 135 transfer credits toward their 180. The 135-credit restriction amounts to no effective change in required credits, since students have always had to take a minimum of 45 UW residence credits as a matriculated student (135 + 45 = 180). However, it may help some 4-year transfer students with mass accumulations of transfer credit who, in the past, would have encountered the 105-credit and 210-credit satisfactory progress rules sooner than most students.

Baccalaureate honors

In order to be eligible for baccalaureate honors (e.g., summa cum laude, magna cum laude, cum laude), students must take a minimum of 90 UW residence credits, at least 60 of which must be taken on a graded basis. Students who are interested in earning baccalaureate honors should consider this before requesting additional lower-division transfer credits to complete their degree.

Using additional lower-division transfer credits to fulfill course requirements

This policy does not affect the way transfer courses can be applied to fulfill course requirements. That is, just as under the old policy, all transferable courses are listed under the Detail of Transfer Credit and may be used to satisfy individual requirements for graduation. This policy only affects the number of credits that can count toward the 180 needed to graduate.

Approving additional lower division transfer credits

Departments are under no obligation to approve additional lower-division transfer credits, and are encouraged to make these determinations consistent with the philosophy and will of their faculty and administrators.

Before additional lower-division transfer credits can be officially approved the credits must be earned at the other institution, be transferred in, be evaluated, and appear on the student's unofficial transcript. Unfortunately, this means that if a student's final credits for her degree will be lower-division transfer credits, her advisor may have to send in the approval in the short window between the end of the quarter and the day Graduation closes the book on that quarter's graduation list.

The earliest a department can officially approve additional lower-division transfer credits is when the graduation application is submitted. There is a space on the GDARS to approve these credits (see below).

If a department wants to approve additional lower-division transfer credits after a graduation application has been submitted, this can be done using this web form.

DARS, GARS, and transcripts

This policy has led to some changes in DARS and GDARS, and some upcoming changes in the unofficial transcript.

DARS now contains a section entitled "Summary of Transfer Credit" which displays the number of upper division transfer credits, lower division transfer credits, and total transfer credits that the student has transferred to the UW. Note that this number is merely a total of all transferable credits; it is not necessarily the number of credits that have been approved to be applied toward the 180.

GDARS now contains a section in which advisers can request that additional lower-division transfer credits be applied. The format is as follows: "Apply ___ more lower division transfer credits beyond the ___ currently applied for a total of ___."

The "Summary of Transfer Credit" section of the unofficial transcript will also undergo some changes due to this policy. Currently, this section includes columns entitled, "2 Year" and "4 Year." These will change to "lower-division" and "upper-division." As of this writing these changes have not yet occurred.

Cross-Campus Enrollment

The University of Washington's original campus is in Seattle. The Bothell and Tacoma campuses were established in 1990 to provide undergraduate and master's level programs to the North Puget Sound and South Puget Sound areas.

Until autumn 2006, the Bothell and Tacoma campuses enrolled only students who had at least junior standing. Beginning in the autumn 2006 quarter, both UW-Bothell and UW-Tacoma began enrolling freshman, as well. The courses and degrees offered are largely different from those available at the Seattle campus.

Admission to UW campuses

Each of the three campuses handles its own admissions. Students applying to the Bothell and Tacoma campuses often apply for admission to a particular major at the same time. Some majors have competitive admission and prerequisite courses in addition to the requirements listed above.

Enrollment and registration

Freshmen, sophomores, juniors, seniors, and postbaccalaureate students enrolled at one UW campus may register using MyUW for courses at another UW campus beginning in Period 2. In summer quarter, cross-campus enrollment is allowed in Period 1 as well.

Eligibility

Freshmen: Once admitted, freshmen must complete 25 credit hours on their home campus before enrolling in courses on other UW campuses. (UW Extension courses are not considered home campus courses.)

Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors, and Postbaccalaureate Students: All students with a class standing from sophomore to postbaccalaureate must complete 15 credits on their home campus before cross-enrolling.

Non-matriculated Students: Nonmatriculated students are not allowed to enroll cross-campus except in the summer. This includes nonmatriculated students taking courses under the staff or Washington State tuition exemption (more information below).

Graduate Students and Graduate Non-Matriculated Students (GNM): There are no restrictions on graduate students registering in courses cross-campus.

Credit limits

A maximum of 15 credits per academic year (autumn quarter through summer quarter) may be taken on a campus other than the home campus.

A maximum of 45 credits earned through cross-enrollment may count toward a bachelor's degree. This restriction is not monitored by web registration, so there is no restriction to the number of credits a student may complete by cross-enrollment, only to the number that may count toward a degree. If there are excess cross-enrollment credits, the department adviser should note this on the application for graduation. DARS is not programmed to know at which campus courses are completed, so a DARS audit will not point out excess cross-enrollment credits.

Note that this 45-credit limit applies only to credits taken at one UW campus while enrolled at another. A student who attends one UW campus and then is admitted to another UW campus may count toward a bachelor's degree any number of credits transferred from the first UW campus to the second (see below).

Credits completed at all UW campuses are posted on the student's transcript as UW credit. Which campus offered the course can be determined by the department abbreviation; each campus has its own set of abbreviations, and none are shared. The campus at which the student was enrolled in a given quarter can be determined by the student's major code that quarter; again, each campus has its own set of abbreviations.

Summer Quarter

All students (including non-matriculated) may cross-enroll during the summer quarter, and they may register during Period 1. Freshmen, sophomores, juniors, seniors, and postbaccalaureate students must complete the required number of home-campus credits first.

Petitions

Individual petitions for waivers of the credit requirements may be considered by the home campus (i.e., the degree-granting unit) registrar. However, the approval of such a waiver does not obligate the campus unit listing the desired course(s) to grant special consideration for course admission.

Prerequisites and Registration Restrictions

All registration restrictions (e.g., class standing, entry codes) still apply. Since similar courses have different prefixes and numbers at different campuses, prerequisites taken at the home campus might not be recognized by MyUW when you try to register cross campus. In that case, please contact the department offering the course.

Administrative details

The home campus is responsible for administrative and disciplinary issues. Hardship withdrawal petitions for all courses will be reviewed by the student's home campus.

Student activity fees are credited to the student's home campus. Students are eligible for student activity fee-supported services only at their home campus. Students cross-enrolling at Seattle are eligible to purchase a U-PASS.

Only Seattle-campus students are eligible to participate in intercollegiate athletics.

Cross-campus majors and minors

Cross-campus double majoring is not allowed.

A student may declare a major on only one campus; a student cannot declare a cross-campus double major or double degree. A student who wishes to complete two majors on two different campuses must first graduate with a major from one campus, then gain admission as a postbaccalaureate student to complete the second major at the other campus.

When a student declared in a major at one campus is accepted in a major at another campus (note that this requires application for admission to the other campus, as well), the student's campus and major codes are changed to the new major.

Cross-campus second degrees

A student who completes a bachelor's degree at one UW campus, and then pursues a second bachelor's degree at another UW campus as a postbaccalaureate student, must complete at least 225 total credits. Of these credits, at least 45 credits must be completed at the second campus. These 45 credits do not have to be the student's last 45 credits. Of the student's final 60 credits, however, 45 must be completed at the campus awarding the degree.

Minors

A student may complete the requirements of a minor offered by another UW campus. Cross-campus minors are declared via the Change of Major/Minor form, submitted to the student's home campus (not the campus offering the minor). The minor will be recorded on the SRF335 (degree) screen, and will be awarded when the degree is granted.

Students should note that UW-B and UW-T minors, unlike Seattle-campus minors, may have admission requirements. Also, most or all of the courses required by a minor will probably be available only at the campus offering the minor.

Transferring from one UW campus to another

A student enrolled at one UW campus who wants to pursue a degree program at another UW campus must apply to that campus for admission. If admitted, the student's campus and major code are changed. A student cannot be enrolled simultaneously at two UW campuses.

Transfer credit vs. cross-campus credit

A student who attends one UW campus and then is admitted to another UW campus may count toward a bachelor's degree any number of credits transferred from the first UW campus to the second. The 45-credit limit on cross-enrollment (see above) applies only to credits taken at one UW campus while enrolled at another campus.

Residence requirement

Only credits taken at the campus granting the degree are considered residence credit. Credits transferred from another UW campus don't count as residence credit, and don't count toward the residence requirement (see Residence-Credit Requirement).

Counting transferred UW credit toward requirements

Credits transferred from another UW campus may be counted toward requirements in the same manner as transfer credits from another college. That is, any adviser can determine how the transferred credits will count toward AoK and other general education requirements. The adviser should then send this information to the DARS office (dars@u.washington.edu) so that the courses can be properly tagged.

Individual departments determine whether credit transferred from another UW campus can count toward major requirements.

Transfer evaluations

When a student is admitted to one of the UW campuses, the admissions office of that campus prepares an evaluation of any credits transferred from other colleges. Most transfer courses are recorded in the student data base with a UW Seattle equivalent or as departmental X credit, regardless of which campus has evaluated the credit. However, there are minor differences in transfer credit practices at the different campuses. Therefore, matriculating at a new campus results in a reevaluation of the credit by the Admissions Office of that campus.

Returning to the original campus

A student who is enrolled at one UW campus, then transfers to another, then decides to return to the original campus, must file a Returning Student Re-enrollment Application. The student's campus and major code will be changed back to the original campus. If a student earns a degree before returning to the original campus, s/he must instead apply for admission as a postbaccalaureate student.

Academic drop and reinstatement

A student who has been dropped for low grades from one UW campus may apply for admission to another UW campus. If that campus wishes to admit the student, it takes the following steps:

  1. The student is admitted.
  2. The student's campus and major codes are changed.
  3. The student's academic status is changed from drop to probation (i.e., the student is reinstated).

Credit by Examination

Credit by examination is a mechanism by which students can receive UW credit for independent study or work completed with private teachers. Regularly admitted and currently enrolled students may take special examinations, sometimes known as "challenging a course," in subject matter offered by the University to gain credit without being enrolled in specific courses. All undergraduate courses in the College are open to credit by examination unless the department specifically excludes the course. Credit by examination requests must be approved by the faculty examiner and the department chair.

Credit by examination can also be used to earn credit for work completed at unaccredited institutions, if a formal examination is deemed necessary by the chair of the concerned department(s). In other cases, the department may be willing to "validate" such coursework without an examination. Students wishing to validate credit should contact the Admissions Office for forms and procedures.

NOTE: Some other UW schools and colleges also allow credit by examination. Students should check with the school or college offering the course in question.

Procedures

Initial inquiries about credit by examination and challenging a course should be directed either to the department chair or to the undergraduate adviser of the specific department. If the student appears eligible to challenge a course (see Restrictions, below), the student will be put in contact with the appropriate instructor, who will determine if the student is academically qualified to take the examination. Permission to challenge a specific course rests with the instructor.

After the student talks with the instructor designated as the one responsible for the course in which the examination is to be taken, the Graduation and Academic Records Office (264 Schmitz Hall) certifies the student's eligibility to take the examination and then issues the application for credit by examination. The instructor and departmental chair must sign the form. The signed form must be brought to the Graduation and Academic Records Office no later than Friday of the second week of the quarter. A payment of $25 per course requested must then be made to the Student Fiscal Services Office. Examinations are administered by the Office of Educational Assessment, no later than the fifth week of the quarter, unless other arrangements are made with the individual instructor for administering the examination.

No student is permitted to take more than two examinations in three-, four-, or five-credit courses, nor more than three examinations in one- or two-credit courses, in one day. Should the student plan to take more examinations in a given quarter, an additional day may be permitted and arrangements may be made with the Office of Educational Assessment or with the individual instructor.

Restrictions

Specific departments may impose particular restrictions, as noted in the departmental policy chart which follows. The general University restrictions are as follows:

  1. A student may not take a credit examination for a course in which s/he has received prior credit, or is registered for in the current quarter. A student may take a credit examination for a course in which s/he has received a grade of 0.0, or has posted a W, X, or I.
  2. All credits secured by examination count as extension credit and, if taken at the UW, are included in the 90-extension-credit maximum allowed toward the bachelor's degree. (For transfer extension credit restrictions, see below.)
  3. No student shall receive credit by examination for a course for which the student would not be eligible to receive credit if the course were taken in residence. For example, a student is not eligible to receive credit by examination for SPAN 201 if credit has already been awarded for SPAN 202.
  4. An examination cannot be repeated.
  5. A student can't receive credit by examination for lower division courses in the student's native language. (Some language departments have more restrictive policies. Refer to departmental policies on the accompanying chart.)
  6. Credit by examination is not acceptable toward an advanced degree in the Graduate School.

Grades

All courses taken credit-by-examination are assigned a numerical grade, unless the course is offered Credit/No-Credit only. The minimum grade to be awarded credit is 2.0; no credit is earned if the student's grade on the examination is below 2.0. As with other extension credit, grades earned are not included in the student's grade-point average.

Eligible students may choose the Satisfactory/Not-Satisfactory (S/NS) option, but should be warned that only electives may be taken S/NS. If the S/NS option is chosen, a numerical grade is assigned and "S/NS option" written at the bottom of the credit-by-examination grade card.

Transfer credit by examination

Credit earned by examination at other colleges is transferable to the UW, if the following two conditions are met.

  1. The credit is awarded for an actual course in that college's curriculum.
  2. The course must be regularly transferable-that is, not credit for life experience or credit the UW considers vocational/technical. If the college granted the student an exemption from a course, and not credit for the course itself, no credit transfers.

Transfer credit by examination is posted as extension credit, with a notation that it was transferred and not UW credit by exam. No more than 45 transfer extension credits (including College Board AP credits not awarded by the UW) count toward a UW degree.

CLEP credit

The College of Arts and Sciences does not accept credits based upon the College-Level Examination Program general examinations. At present, no department accepts credits for the specific CLEP subject-matter examination in that field.

Department policies on credit by examination

In many UW departments no undergraduate courses may be challenged. Departments which allow certain courses to be challenged, or allow courses to be challenged under some circumstances, are listed below.
Department/ProgramAre all undergraduate courses open to challenge?Which undergraduate courses are not subject to challenge?Comments
American Ethnic StudiesNoAllSee undergraduate adviser for possible exceptions.
AnthropologyYes See undergraduate adviser.
ArtOnly for advanced placement (no credit granted) Students must be art majors. See undergraduate adviser.
Art HistoryYes See undergraduate adviser.
Atmospheric SciencesYes See undergraduate adviser.
BiologyNoBIOL 180, 200, 220300-level and above, see the instructor or the Faculty Coordinator of Biology Instruction.
ChemistryNoLab coursesNormally student should register for the course and make arrangements with instructor to take exams without attending class, rather than formally challenging the course.
CommunicationNo400-level coursesSee undergraduate adviser.
Comparative LiteratureNoC LIT 396, 397, 460, 490, 491, 495, 496, 497See undergraduate adviser.
DramaYes See chair or undergraduate adviser.
EconomicsYes See undergraduate adviser.
EnglishNoComposition coursesSee Director of Undergraduate Programs.
GeographyNoGEOG 490-499Other courses open to challenge with approval of instructor. See undergraduate adviser.
GermanicsNoThe only courses students can test out of and receive credit for are 201 and 202. Native speakers cannot receive credit by exam.Students may test out of other language-learning courses (without credit), but to complete a German major or minor, they must enroll for and earn credit for all of the required literature and culture courses.
HistoryNoSeminar coursesSee undergraduate adviser.
International StudiesNoEURO 490, 491
SIS 495, 498
SISEA 451, 455
SISLA 480, 485, 493
SISRE 343,457
See undergraduate adviser for all programs.
MusicNoMUSEN and MUSAP prefix coursesSee undergraduate adviser.
Near Eastern Languages and CivilizationNoNative speakers may not challenge elementary and intermediate language courses.See undergraduate adviser.
PhilosophyYes See chair or undergraduate adviser.
PhysicsNoNo lab courses, courses for teachers, individual study, or seminarsSee undergraduate adviser.
Political ScienceNoPOL S 101See undergraduate adviser.
PsychologyYes See undergraduate adviser.
Romance Languages and LiteratureNo 100-level courses and courses numbered 303 and above. Native speakers may not challenge 200-level courses or conversation courses at any level.
Scandinavian StudiesNoOnly 100- and 200-level language instruction courses may be challenged (DANISH, FINN, NORW, SWED), up to a maximum of 30 credits. Native speakers may not challenge at the 100 or 200 levels.See undergraduate adviser.
    
Slavic Languages and LiteraturesNoStudents may challenge a maximum of 5 credits of language instruction courses, in courses numbered 300 and above only.See undergraduate adviser.
Speech and Hearing SciencesNoSPHSC 391, 405, 406, 471, 481, 491, 499See undergraduate adviser.
StatisticsYes  
Women StudiesYes See director or departmental adviser.

Duplicate Courses

The following is a list of instances in which a student does not receive credit for one course because s/he has already taken another. This AIF is concerned primarily with separate courses that are considered to have overlapping content, and with advanced courses that preclude credit for more elementary ones. Specific courses are listed below.

Courses which are also considered duplicate credit but are not listed below:

  • Courses that have changed numbers
  • Courses that are offered jointly by two departments ("double-listed" courses)

Credits and grades

Since credit for a duplication is not removed until after the course has been completed, duplicate credits do count toward the student's credit total for the quarter. They count toward the 12-credit minimum required for students on finanacial aid, international students, etc.

Even after the credit has been removed, grades in duplicate courses are included in the student's GPA.

Miscellaneous courses

There are relatively few duplicates outside of mathematics, chemistry, and the language departments. Advisers should try to commit to memory the general-education courses on this list in boldface. Other duplications on this list occur infrequently or involve courses no longer offered.

ASTR101, 102
101, 201
102, 201
102, 301
Will not receive credit for both courses in each pair
BIOL106 = 150 = 100 autumn
107 = 151 = 100 winter
152 = 100 spring
Maximum of one course from each of the three lines (total of 15 credits) allowed. From autumn 1999 on, a maximum 5 credits for BIOL 100
BIOL180 = 203
200 = 201
220 = 202
No credit for 180, 200, 220 if equivalent course in 201, 202, 203 sequence already completed.
CMU150, 203
200, 202
214, 201
Will not receive credit for both courses in each pair
CSECSE/INFO 100, CSE 142No credit for 100 if taken after 142
CSECSE 142, ENGR 141Will not receive credit for both courses
CSE341, 413
378, 410
401, 413
410, 451
415, 473
CSE 451, E E 474
Will not receive credit for both courses in each pair
CSECSE 373, CSE 326, 
CSE/E E 374
Will receive credit for only one course
ECON100No credit if taken after 200 or 201, autumn 1985 or later
ECON311See STAT 311
ENGL131 = 181Change of numbers, effective winter 1988. Will not receive credit for both if 131 taken summer 1988 or later.
ESS101, 210Will not receive credit for both (ESS 101 formerly GEOL 101; ESS 210 formerly GEOL 205)
GENET  360, 365Will not receive credit for both courses
GEOL101, 205Will not receive credit for both courses
LING200, 201Will not receive credit for both courses
LING200 or 201, 400No credit for 200 or 201 if taken after 400
PHYS114, 121
115, 122
116, 123
117, 131
118, 132
119, 133
Will not receive credit for both courses in each pair if taken autumn 1982 or later.
PSYCH  100, 101
100, 102
101, 102
Will not receive credit for both courses in each pair
STAT220, 301, 
STAT/ECON 311
Maximum 5 credits allowed
STAT341, 481Will not receive credit for both courses unless either is taken autumn 1996 or later
STATSTAT/MATH 390, STAT 481, ECON 580Will receive credit for only one course
STATSTAT/QMETH 403, STAT 503Will receive credit for only one course

Mathematics

Within 100-level mathematics courses, students do not receive credit for a prerequisite course after completing the more advanced course. Credit policies for specific course combinations are listed below.

MATH  105 = 120
156 = 111
157 = 112
These are the same courses, renumbered; students may receive credit only once for each pair. The rules below for 120, 111, and 112 also apply to 105, 156, and 157, respectively.
MATH120, 124, 125, 126No credit for the prerequisite course taken after the more advanced course
MATH111, 112No credit for 111 if taken after 112
MATH111, 120
120, 112
111, 124
112, 124
Credit is allowed for both courses in each pair, in either order
MATH124, 127
125, 128
126, 129
Will not receive credit for both courses in each pair
MATH205, 308No credit for 205 if taken after 308

Chemistry

No credit for a prerequisite course taken after the more advanced course.

CHEM  100Formerly no credit if one year or more of chem in high school; this restriction was removed, effective autumn 1986. The change is retroactive.
CHEM101, 105, 140Formerly maximum of 5 credits if one year of chemistry in high school; this restriction was removed autumn 1986, retroactively.
CHEM120, 142, 14410 credits if both courses taken before summer 2003; maximum 5 credits if either or both courses taken summer 2003 or later
CHEM140/141, 142, 144, 145Maximum 5 credits
CHEM150/151, 152, 154, 155Maximum 5 credits
CHEM160/161, 162, 164, 165Maximum 5 credits (6 if CHEM 162 taken before spring 2005)
CHEM141, 151, 157, 161Maximum 5 credits (6 if CHEM 162 taken before spring 2005)
CHEM145, 155, 162Maximum 10 credits (11 if CHEM 162 taken before spring 2005)
CHEM145, 155, 250Maximum 10 credits
CHEM160/161, 164, 312Maximum 9 credits before autumn 1996
CHEM164, 165, 312Maximum 5 credits autumn 1996 or later
CHEM220, 223, 237, 335Maximum 5 credits
CHEM221, 224, 239, 337Maximum 5 credits
CHEM238, 336Maximum 4 credits
CHEM241, 346Maximum 3 credits
CHEM242, 347Maximum 3 credits
CHEM250, 350, 351, 352Maximum 6 credits
CHEM350, 351, 352, 456Maximum 6 credits
CHEM355, 452Maximum 3 credits
CHEM452, 456Maximum 3 credits

Foreign languages

In all languages at the first- and second-year levels, credit is not allowed for a prerequisite course taken after a more advanced course. For courses beyond the second year, policies differ from department to department. Credit policies for specific course combinations are listed below. A number of these courses are no longer offered.

ASIAN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE

Prior to autumn 2002, first-, second, and third-year Chinese courses were numbered 111, 112, 113; 211, 212, 213; and 311, 312, 313. Starting in autumn 2002, these courses became the "heritage" sequences for students with some background in the language, and the first- and second-year sequences for students with no background in Chinese were given new course numbers: 101, 102, 103; 201, 202, 203; 301, 302, 303. The heritage and non-heritage sequences roughly parallel one another and credit is not allowed for both.

UW offers instruction in Mandarin Chinese. Cantonese is considered to be a different dialect, not a separate language, and credit is not allowed for both.

CHIN101, 111
102, 112
103, 113
201, 211
202, 212
203, 213
Maximum 5 credits allowed for each pair of courses
CHIN101+102 = 121
111+112 = 121
Maximum 10 credits allowed
CHIN103+201 = 222
113+211 = 222
Maximum 10 credits allowed
CHIN202+203 = 223
212+213 = 223
Maximum 10 credits allowed
CHIN101+102+103 = 134
111+112+113 = 134
Maximum 15 credits allowed
CHIN101+102+103 = 138
111+112+113 = 138
Maximum 15 credits allowed
CHIN201+202+203 = 234
211+212+213 = 234
Maximum 15 credits allowed
CHIN101, 102, 103, 111, 
112, 113, 121, 134
Maximum 15 credits allowed
CHIN101, 102, 103, 111, 
112, 113, 121, 134, 
201, 211, 222
Maximum 20 credits allowed
CHIN101, 102, 103, 111, 
112, 113, 121, 134, 
201, 202, 211, 212, 
222
Maximum 25 credits allowed
CHIN101, 102, 103, 111, 
112, 113, 121, 134, 
201, 202, 203, 211, 
212, 213, 222, 223, 
234
Maximum 30 credits allowed
JAPAN  111+112+113 = 134Maximum 15 credits allowed
JAPAN211+212+213 = 234Maximum 15 credits allowed
JAPAN121, 111
121, 112
5 credits allowed for each pair

As in Chinese, we offer "heritage" sequences for students with some background in Korean, and sequences for students with no background in Korean. The heritage and non-heritage sequences roughly parallel one another and credit is not allowed for both.

KOREAN  301, 305
302, 306
303, 307
311, 315
312, 316
313, 317
Maximum 5 credits allowed for each pair of courses
VIET111, 112, 113, 211, 
212, 213
No credit if 214 taken
VIET214No credit if any previous VIET taken

  

CLASSICS
GREEK  101, 300
101, 301
Will not receive credit for both courses in each pair
GREEK(101, 102, 103)
and (300, 301)
Will not receive credit for both sequences
LATIN101, 300
101, 301
Will not receive credit for both courses in each pair
LATIN(101, 102, 103)
and (300, 301)
Will not receive credit for both sequences

  

GERMANICS
GERMAN  101, C111, 
first 5 credits of 104
5 credits allowed
GERMAN102, C112, 
second 5 credits of 104
5 credits allowed
GERMAN103, C113,
last 5 credits of 104
5 credits allowed
GERMAN101+102+103 = 100 (formerly 115)Maximum 15 credits allowed
GERMAN104 (15 cr.) = 100 (formerly 115)Maximum 15 credits allowed
GERMANC111+C112+C113 = 100 (formerly 115)Maximum 15 credits allowed
GERMAN111 (not C111) and 102Will not receive credit for both courses
GERMAN121, 122Do not overlap with any other courses; no credit restriction (but no credit for 121 after 122)
GERMAN150No credit if 250 previously taken
GERMAN201+202 = 221Maximum 10 credits allowed
GERMAN201+202+203 = 200Maximum 15 credits allowed
GERMAN201, C211
202, C212
Maximum 5 credits allowed for each pair
GERMAN203(5) = former 203(3) + 207(2)Maximum 5 credits allowed
GERMAN203, 205Maximum 5 credits allowed

  

NEAR EASTERN LANGUAGES AND CIVILIZATION
ARAB411+412+413 = 401
471+472+473 = 470
311+312+313 = 315
Maximum 15 credits allowed (these three are the same sequence, renumbered)
ARAB421+422+423 = 424Maximum 15 credits allowed
ARAB431+432+433 = 434Maximum 9 credits allowed
HEBR411+412+413 = 401
471+472+473 = 470
311+312+313 = 315
Maximum 15 credits allowed (these three are the same sequence, renumbered)
PRSAN  411+412+413 = 402
471+472+473 = 470
Maximum 15 credits allowed (these are two are the same sequence, renumbered)
PRSAN421+422+423 = 424Maximum 15 credits allowed
TKICTKIC 411+412+413 = 401
TKIC 481+482+483 = 478
TKIC 301+302+303 = 316
TKISH 301+302+303 = 316
Uzbek Maximum 15 credits allowed (these sequences represent the same courses, renumbered)
TKICTKIC414+415+416 = 402
TKIC 474+475+476 = 477
TKISH 304+305+306 = 317
Kazakh No credit for 402 (15 credits) if taken after 414,415,416 (9 credits), and vice versa (these sequences represent the same courses, renumbered)
TKICTKIC 421+422+423 = 404
TKIC 405+406+407 = 426
TKISH 405+406+407 = 426
intermediate Uzbek No credit for 404 (15 credits) if taken after 421,422,423 (9 credits), and vice versa (these sequences represent the same courses, renumbered)

  

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE
FRENCH  110 and 101Will not receive credit for both courses
FRENCH110 and 102Will not receive credit for both courses
FRENCHC111 = 101Will not receive credit for both courses
FRENCHC112 = 102Will not receive credit for both courses
FRENCHC113 = 103Will not receive credit for both courses
FRENCH241 = 103+201Max. 10 credits allowed
FRENCH242 = 202+203Max. 10 credits allowed
FRENCH101, 121Credit for both allowed
FRENCH102, 1225 credits allowed
FRENCH103, 1235 credits allowed
FRENCH121+122+123 = 134Maximum 15 credits allowed
FRENCH101, 13420 credits allowed if 101 taken first and if 134 taken before summer of 1997; otherwise, 15 credits allowed
FRENCH102, 134Maximum 15 credits allowed if 102 taken first and if 134 taken before summer of 1997; otherwise, 10 credits allowed
FRENCH103, 134Maximum 10 credits allowed if 103 taken first and if 134 taken before summer of 1997; otherwise, 5 credits allowed
ITAL101+102+103 = 134Maximum 15 credits allowed
ITAL111 = 101+102Maximum 10 credits allowed
ITAL113 = 102+103Maximum 10 credits allowed
ITAL111, 113Maximum 15 credits allowed
ITALC111 = 101Will not receive credit for both courses
ITALC112 = 102Will not receive credit for both courses
ITALC113 = 103Will not receive credit for both courses
PORT101, 102, 103, 105Maximum 15 credits
SPAN101, 121Credit for both allowed only if both taken before autumn 2003
SPAN102, 1225 credits allowed
SPAN103, 1235 credits allowed
SPAN101+102+103 = 13420 credits allowed for 101+134 if 101 taken first and if 134 taken before summer of 2003; otherwise, maximum 15 credits
SPANC111 = 101Will not receive credit for both courses
SPANC112 = 102Will not receive credit for both courses
SPANC113 = 103Will not receive credit for both courses
SPAN104No credit if 102 and/or 103 taken, and vice versa
SPAN121+122+123 = 134Maximum 15 credits
SPAN201+202 = 210Maximum 10 credits
SPAN204Credit is not allowed if 202 and/or 203 taken. (Since this is not stated in the 1998-2000 catalog, however, a student who took the course then may petition the Graduation Committee for the credit.)
SPAN301+302 = 310Maximum 10 credits

  

SCANDINAVIAN STUDIES
FINN101+102+103 = 150Maximum 15 credits allowed
NORW  101+102+103 = 150Maximum 15 credits allowed
SWED101+102+103 = 150Maximum 15 credits allowed

  

SLAVIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES
RUSS  101+102 = 110Maximum 10 credits allowed
RUSS103+201 = 115Maximum 10 credits allowed
RUSS202+203 = 210Maximum 10 credits allowed
RUSS101+102+103 = 150Maximum 15 credits allowed
RUSS201+202+203 = 250Maximum 15 credits allowed
RUSS301+302+303 = 350Maximum 15 credits allowed
RUSS401+402+403 = 450Maximum 15 credits allowed

UW-Bothell & UW-Tacoma courses

Beginning in autumn 2006, UW-Bothell and UW-Tacoma began offering lower division courses that are duplicates of UW-Seattle courses. DARS is programmed to catch these duplicates and remove credit from the second one if both are taken. Since the courses have very different prefixes, advisers should be aware of and keep an eye out for these courses. More will be added as UW-Bothell and UW-Tacoma continue to increase the numbers of freshmen they admit.

UW-BothellB CUSP 123 = MATH 120
B CUSP 124 = MATH 124
B CUSP 142 = CHEM 141
B CUSP 152 = CHEM 152
B CUSP 162 = CHEM 162
B CUSP 200 = ECON 200
B CUSP 201 = ECON 201
Will not receive credit for both courses in each pair

Courses that are not duplications of one another

Certain courses have been "replaced" by others in the curriculum, but the new course in each case is more than a simple renumbering of the old course, and the official course description does not advertise it as a duplication. Credit may be earned for both courses in the following pairs:

  • ASTR 102 and ASTR 211
  • ENV S 101 and GEN ST 110

Hyphenated Course Sequences

Certain course sequences at the University of Washington are hyphenated to indicate that the material covered has been extended over two or three quarters, and that students are expected to take the entire sequence. There are two types of hyphenated courses. In some hyphenated sequences, credit and grades are not granted until the hyphenated sequence is completed (e.g., ENGL 104-105); in these sequences, a grade of “N” is recorded for the first quarter. The N is erased and a grade entered in its place only upon completion of the sequence. In other hyphenated sequences, a grade is recorded for the first quarter and the student is not actually required to complete the second quarter.

Sequences in which credit is awarded after each course

In the following undergraduate sequences, the student is granted credit (and a grade) after successfully completing each course. For this type of hyphenated sequence, the grades for the individual courses may-and often will-be different. Although the student is not required to complete the sequence, it is strongly recommended that s/he do so. Because the material in the sequences is progressive, the first course in the sequence is normally a prerequisite to the second course, and the second course is normally a prerequisite to the third.

Arts and Sciences
      BIOL161-162General Biology (5-5)
 MATH  421-422Conceptual Calculus for Teachers (3-3)
 PHYS405-406Physical Science by Inquiry II (5-5)
 SOC424-425Applied Social Statistics (3-3)
 SOC496-497-498  Honors Senior Seminar (3/5-3/5-3/5)
Medicine
      P BIO405-406Human Physiology (4-4)
 REHAB  444-445  Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy (4-4)
Nursing
      NURS  309-310  Pharmacotherapeutics in Nursing Practice I, II (2-2)

Sequences in which credit awarded after completion of the sequence

In the following undergraduate sequences, the student is given a grade of N upon completion of the first quarter(s), and the same numerical grade is assigned to all courses in the sequence upon completion of the final quarter. After the computer enters the grade for the last course, the Graduation and Academic Records Office replaces the N grade(s) for the earlier course(s) with the grade that was assigned for the final course, and the credits-earned total and cumulative GPA are adjusted.

Arts and Sciences
      BIO A388-389Human Fossils and Evolution (5-5)
 CHID491-492-493  Senior Thesis (5-5-5)
 ENGL104-105Introductory Composition (5-5)
 HIST491-492Honors Historical Method (5-5)
 PHYS101-102Physical Science by Inquiry I (5-5)
 POL S  488-489Honors Senior Thesis (5-5)
 SIS491-492Senior Honors Seminar (5-5)
Business
      ENTRE   472-473  Creating a Company (4-4)
Engineering
      A A410-411Aircraft Design I,II (4-4)
 A A420-421Spacecraft and Space Systems Design I,II (4-4)
 E E495-496Electrical Engineering Design: Integrated Circuit (4-4)
 E E497-498Electrical Engineering Design: Consumer Electronics (4-4)
 ENGR  321-322  Engineering Cooperative Education (1/2-0)

Credit for uncompleted sequences

If for any reason the instructor submits a numerical grade rather than an N for part of an uncompleted sequence, the student receives "terminal credit" and is not required to complete the sequence to receive credit for the completed portion. When special circumstances warrant, a student may request terminal credit; terminal credit is granted at the discretion of the instructor.

Failing the first quarter of a sequence

If the student fails the first quarter of a sequence, the department may, if it chooses, submit a failing grade (0.0, or NC in a CR/NC sequence) in place of the N normally submitted.

Transfer courses

If a student transfers to the University a course which is equivalent to part of a UW hyphenated sequence (e.g., PHYS 101), s/he will automatically be allowed credit toward graduation for the course without having to complete the sequence.

When the hyphen is removed before a student completes the sequence

If a course was hyphenated when a student completed the first portion, but the sequence is no longer hyphenated, the student will receive credit for the portion of the sequence completed. No special request is necessary.

ROTC Credits

100- and 200-level courses taken beginning in Autumn 2007 in Aerospace Studies, Military Science, and Naval Science are treated the same as any other class (i.e., they are offered for credit, the credits count toward the 180 credits required for graduation, and the grades are counted in the student's grade-point average).

100- and 200-level courses taken prior to Autumn 2007 in Aerospace Studies, Military Science, and Naval Science were offered for credit, but credits earned in such courses did not count toward the 180 credits required for graduation. The grades in these courses were, however, counted in the student's grade-point average.

To the extent that individual program requirements allow for free electives, up to 18 credits of 300- and 400-level courses in Aerospace Studies, Military Science, and Naval Science may count toward graduation in any undergraduate program at the University. If the courses have a general education designation, such as I&S or W course, they can be counted toward general education requirements.

100-Level PE Credits

By action of the University Senate (May 21, 1970), physical education courses are not required for graduation from the University.

University policy places no limit on the number of PE credits allowed toward graduation, but individual colleges may impose whatever limit they wish. Since no college allows more than three 100-level PE credits toward graduation, the Office of the Registrar limits to three the number of 100-level PE credits (whether taken at the UW or at another school) included in credits earned toward graduation.

PE credits allowed toward graduation

As of autumn 1975 the UW stopped offering 100-level PE activity courses for credit. PE activity credits earned before that time at the UW, or transferred at any time from other institutions, may apply toward graduation within the restrictions noted below.

100-level PE courses

A maximum of three credits of 100-level PE courses taken at the UW (or their equivalents at other institutions) may be counted as elective credits toward graduation with a bachelor's degree from all UW schools and colleges except Engineering. For Engineering policies, consult individual departments.

A student may receive credit toward graduation only once for a given 100-level PE course, although s/he may have registered for that course more than once. A student who has taken several quarters of the same intercollegiate sport, at a time when intercollegiate sports were offered as 100-level PE courses, may count only one credit of such a sport toward the maximum three 100-level PE credits allowed.

Before summer 1974 the Registrar's Office did not place any limit on the number of PE credits recorded in the "credits earned" column of the grade reports and transcripts, so students enrolled at the UW before summer 1974 who have taken more than three 100-level PE courses will have more credits recorded than may actually be counted toward graduation. Some other students may have been temporarily allowed more than three 100-level PE transfer credits. The Office of Graduation and Academic Records will audit out the excess credits before these students graduate.

A former restriction that only PE courses taken autumn 1970 or after could be counted has been removed. PE courses taken at any time may be counted.

200-level PE courses

PE courses numbered 200 and above count toward graduation with no restrictions.

PE grades

Any 100-level PE course taken at the UW (in the past) for a regular grade will be counted in the student's graduation GPA, whether the course counts for credit or not. Grades for transferred PE courses, however, are not posted on the student's transfer evaluation and don't count in the student's transfer GPA.