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General Education Requirements

There are five main components to the General Education Requirements at the UW: English Composition, Additional Writing (W), Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning (Q/SR), Foreign Language, and the Areas of Knowledge (AoK). The Areas of Knowledge are made up of Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts (VLPA), Individuals and Societies (I&S), and Natural World (NW).

English Composition

Freshmen entering the UW autumn 1985 or later (and transfer students entering the UW autumn 1987 or later) are required to complete 5 credits of English composition. All schools and colleges use the University English composition list, below.

Arts and Sciences English composition requirement

Students who start college anywhere in autumn 1985 or later and graduate from the UW College of Arts and Sciences must complete 5 credits of English composition, with a minimum grade of 2.0. (Note that Arts and Sciences does not allow a two-year grace period for transfer students in this instance; also note that Arts and Sciences uses the date the student started college, not the date the student entered the UW.) Students who started college before autumn 1985 are eligible for an earlier "proficiency" requirement, described in Pre-1985 General Education and Basic Skills Requirements. See Determining quarter of entry if the date on which the student started college isn't clear.

Other colleges

Every college follows the University requirement of 5 credits of English composition. Each school or college of the University decides for itself to what extent it will follow the policy of Arts and Sciences in applying requirements to students who began college before 1985.

English composition course list

Students in all UW schools and colleges must complete one 5-credit composition course from the approved course list.

There is no exemption test in English composition; the requirement must be satisfied with college coursework.

*ENGL 109-110 (formerly ENGL 104-105) is a 10-credit equivalent of the 5-credit ENGL 131, open only to students in the Educational Opportunity Program. See Guidelines for Advising EOP Students for placement information. A student must complete both courses to receive credit. The sequence counts as only 5 credits toward English composition or the additional writing requirement; the other 5 credits count as elective credit.

Additional UW courses

The following UW courses (or their transfer equivalents), although seldom presented for the reasons indicated, may be used to satisfy the English composition requirement. They may also count toward the additional writing requirement. (No course may simultaneously count toward both requirements.) These courses (except UW's T C 231) have already been flagged by DARS, so a DARS exception is not necessary.

B CMU 301Basic Written Business Communications (4)restricted to juniors and above; satisfies the English composition requirement even though it is 4 credits
ENGR 130Introduction to Technical Writing (5)no longer offered
ENGL 106Practical Forms of Writing (5)prerequisite: 105; not currently offered
ENGL 182The Research Papernot currently offered
T C 231(formerly ENGR 231) Introduction to Technical Writing (3)The three-credit UW course by itself does not satisfy the requirement, but a five-credit transfer course (T C 231 plus two credits of T C 1XX or 2XX) is acceptable. Since the prerequisite to T C 231 is a beginning composition course, most students who take T C 231 count it toward the additional writing requirement.
ENGL 381(formerly 379) Advanced Expository Writing (5)not suggested for freshmen; prior completion of 281 recommended
ENGL 382Writing for the Web (5)not suggested for freshmen; prerequisite: ENGL 282
ENGL 471(formerly 441) The Composition Process (5)not suggested for freshmen; prerequisite: permission; this is a course in composition theory and pedogogy for prospective high school teachers
ENGL 481(formerly 421) Special Studies in Expository Writing (5)not suggested for freshmen; prior completion of ENGL 381 strongly recommended
ENGL 492(formerly 494) Advanced Expository Writing Conference (1-5, max. 10)prerequisite: permission

Transfer courses

Transfer courses in English composition will usually transfer as a direct equivalent, for example as ENGL 131. An English composition course which is not the direct equivalent of a UW course will transfer as ENGL 1XX and be flagged with a C so DARS will recognize it as a composition course.

Advisers may approve other transfer courses if they are similar to courses on the English composition list and met the composition requirement at the former school. Many colleges have a required freshman or honors "core course" or core sequence that strongly emphasizes writing. Sometimes these transfer as ENGL 1XX, but more often they transfer as UW 1XX or even X credit in another department (e.g., HIST 1XX). If the primary focus of the course was formal writing instruction, it can count toward the English composition requirement. The first 5 quarter credits of such a course or sequence, if used to satisfy the English composition requirement, cannot also count toward Areas of Knowledge.

The adviser should post a "C" on the SRF330 screen on any transfer course approved to count as composition, so the course will be recognized as English composition when a DARS audit is run. (It isn't necessary to post a C on any course that transfers as the direct equivalent of a course on the English composition list above.)

4-1/2- and 4-credit courses

An English composition course that transfers as 4-1/2 credits satisfies the requirement. A 4-credit English composition course from Western Washington University also satisfies the requirement. Any other 4-credit English composition course must be petitioned through the student's college Graduation Committee; these petitions are usually granted. If a 4-credit course is being used to satisfy the requirement, a DARS exception is necessary. The adviser can either submit the exception or send a request to dars@u.washington.edu. (No petition is required in the Business School, nor is a DARS exception necessary.)

Note that some UW colleges, including the College of Engineering, require only 12 credits of writing: 5 credits of English composition, plus 7 credits as specified by the college. Twelve credits is the University minimum. A student who is using WWU's 4-credit composition to satisfy the English composition requirement, or who has successfully petitioned a 4-credit composition course from another college, must still complete 12 credits of writing or must petition the University to graduate with 11 credits of writing.

Duplicate courses

A student who has transfer credit for a particular English composition course and later wishes to take the equivalent course at the UW (or accidentally takes the equivalent course at the UW) can have the transfer course changed to ENGL 1XX so that credit for both courses will count toward graduation. This is also possible with extension-credit courses, including College in the High School, and credit granted for AP test scores. (These will be changed to ENGL 999.) The student should make the request at the English undergraduate advising office.

Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate

Advanced Placement test scores

Students admitted to the UW in summer 2003 or later will receive English literature credit for AP scores of 4 or 5 instead of English composition credit.

Students admitted to the UW before summer 2003 with scores of 4 or 5 receive credit for ENGL 111. (Students admitted to the UW before autumn 1999 received credit for ENGL 111 for scores of 3, 4, or 5.)

A student with AP credit for ENGL 111 who wants to enroll in UW's ENGL 111 may ask to have the AP credit changed to ENGL 131. If the student also wants or has UW credit for ENGL 131, the AP credit can be changed to ENGL 999. The student should make the request at the English undergraduate advising office.

International Baccalaureate

International Baccalaureate scores submitted summer 2003 or later are awarded credit for English literature only, not English composition. The award is posted as ENGL 108, a course number created for just this award. IB English scores submitted summer 2003 or later are not awarded W (intensive writing) credit.

English credit for the International Baccalaureate scores submitted before summer 2003, which shows up as extension course "ENGL 999" on the transcript and on the SRF320 screen, can be counted toward either the English composition requirement, OR toward both VLPA and the additional writing requirement. DARS will automatically count the course as an English composition course. If the student plans to count the course as VLPA and W instead a DARS exception should be made, or send the request to dars@u.washington.edu

A student with an old IB score can request the current award, but this is not recommended since in English the old award is more liberal than the current one.

Grade required

In the College of Arts and Sciences, courses taken to satisfy the English composition requirement must be passed with a grade of at least 2.0. Transferred courses must be passed with a grade of at least C.

Pass-fail

As of autumn 1985, courses taken at the UW to fulfill any graduation requirement, including English composition, cannot be taken Satisfactory/Not Satisfactory (S/NS).

Transferred courses taken under a student-option pass-fail system may be counted toward English composition if taken before the student matriculated at the UW. These courses should be recorded with a grade of CR by the Admissions Office, and will be recognized as English composition by DARS. If a transfer course posted with an S grade should be counted as English composition, submit a request to the DARS office to allow the course to count.

Courses that were available only on a non-graded basis are automatically acceptable, whether taken before or after matriculation at the UW. These courses will appear on the transfer evaluation with no grade; if you run a DARS, they will appear with a grade of T.

UW courses taken S/NS before matriculation at the UW may also be used to satisfy the English composition requirement.

Spring 2001 TA strike

Because of the teaching assistant strike in spring quarter 2001, class assignments in many courses were not graded by the end of the quarter. Students who completed the assignments in English department courses were allowed to submit their assignments to the department; these students were awarded the grade Credit (CR). If the assignments were later graded, the student's numerical grade for the course was submitted and replaced the CR (if the student had not graduated in the meantime). Students who received a CR grade in an English composition course in spring 2001 are allowed to use the course to satisfy the English composition requirement.

Overlaps and restrictions

The course(s) used to meet the English composition requirement cannot also count toward the additional writing requirement or the Areas of Knowledge requirement. The course(s) used to meet the English composition requirement can also count toward the student's major, if applicable.

Starting in Spring 2009, students with composition (“C”) credit in English 111, 121, or 131 (i.e., students who receive a grade of 2.0 or higher in any of these courses) are prevented from enrolling in a second course in this series.

In exceptional cases, students will be able to petition the English department for permission to register for a second 111, 121, or 131 course. Students who have successfully completed ENGL 109/110 or any of the Interdisciplinary Writing Program courses (ENGL 197, 198, 199) will not be similarly restricted from enrolling in ENGL 111, 121, or 131.

Transfer students who have 10 or more credits of courses deemed equivalent to ENGL 111, 121, or 131 will not "lose" credit as a result of this change.

Exemptions

Postbaccalaureate students

Students who have already completed a bachelor's degree at the UW or elsewhere are exempt from the University (and Arts and Sciences) English composition requirement.

Proficiency tests

There is no test for exemption from the English composition requirement.

Admission deficiency

A student is deficient in English if English is her/his first language and s/he lacks the University admission requirement of four high school units (years) of English and other language arts. (For students admitted before summer quarter 1992, the requirement was three years rather than four.) A student whose first language is not English and who lacks the University admission requirement should see the Admissions Office about the available options for satisfying the English core requirement.

An English deficiency is removed by successful completion of one college course of at least four quarter credits in English (composition or literature) for each unit of deficiency. One of the four years may be satisfied by a college course in speech, drama as literature, journalistic writing, business English, ESL, or engineering/ technical writing. Normally, an English admission deficiency must be removed before matriculation at the UW.

Courses taken to remove high school core deficiencies may be taken S/NS. English composition courses taken to remove a high school English deficiency (except non-credit courses) may count toward the English composition requirement, if taken for a grade.

Additional Writing

For freshmen entering the UW autumn 1994 or later (and for transfer students entering the UW autumn 1996 or later), the Faculty Senate has established an additional writing requirement of 7 credits, beyond the 5-credit English composition course required of all students. The 7 credits must be in "writing-intensive" courses; that is, either additional English composition courses or W courses.

There is no University-level English composition or additional writing requirement for students entering college before 1985. For freshmen entering the UW autumn 1985 through summer 1994 (and for transfer students entering the UW autumn 1987 through summer 1996), the University-level additional writing requirement is either an additional composition course or two W courses.

Arts and Sciences requirement

Students who start college anywhere in autumn 1985 or later and graduate from the UW College of Arts and Sciences must complete 10 credits of writing-intensive courses in addition to the 5 credits of English composition required. The 10 credits may be any combination of English composition and/or W courses. Note that Arts and Sciences does not allow a two-year grace period for transfer students in this instance; also note that Arts and Sciences uses the date the student started college, not the date the student entered the UW. Students who started college before autumn 1985 are eligible for an earlier "proficiency" requirement, described in Pre-1985 General Education and Basic Skills Requirements. See Determining quarter of entry if the date when the student started college isn't clear.

Other colleges

Each college has structured its requirements to meet or exceed the University additional writing requirement. Some colleges require specific courses to meet the additional writing requirement. See General Education and Basic Skills Requirements of UW Schools and Colleges. Each school or college of the University decides for itself to what extent it will follow the policy of Arts and Sciences in applying requirements to students who began college before 1985.

Acceptable English composition courses

Any course(s) from the Arts and Sciences English composition list may count toward the additional writing requirement if the course is not being counted toward the English composition requirement itself. Courses from the additional UW English composition course list may also count.

Other composition courses

The UW courses listed below, and their transfer equivalents, may count toward the additional writing requirement but may not count toward the 5-credit English composition requirement.

B CMU 410  Business Reports and Other Specialized Communications (5)
*T C 231Introduction to Technical Writing (3)
T C 333Advanced Technical Writing and Oral Presentation (4)
T C 401Style in Scientific and Technical Writing (3)

*T C 231 may not satisfy the English composition requirement because it is only 3 credits. The equivalent course at community colleges is usually 5 credits, and can be used to satisfy the English composition requirement. Three credits of T C 231 plus at least another 2 credits of English composition could be used to satisfy the English composition requirement-but the UW offers only 5-credit English composition courses.

The following courses, and other similar courses, do not count toward the additional writing requirement (nor toward English composition): creative writing, short-story writing, novel writing, verse writing. All four types of courses do, however, count toward VLPA.

Transfer courses

Transfer courses in English composition will usually transfer as a direct equivalent (for example, "ENGL 131"), or as ENGL 1XX. ENGL 1XX composition courses from Washington community colleges should be flagged by the Office of Admissions as English composition. Advisers may approve other courses, including those transferring as UW 1XX, if the primary purpose of the course was formal writing instruction. The adviser should post the C using the SRF330 screen. Note that creative writing and verse writing courses, which count as English composition courses at Washington community colleges, are counted by the UW as neither composition nor W courses.

W courses

W courses emphasize writing and provide students the opportunity to develop their writing skills within a particular discipline, such as history or biology. In W-prefix courses writing is an integral part of the course, contributing to the understanding and appreciation of the subject matter being taught. Writing takes place over an extended period of time, so that students receive feedback on their writing and have the opportunity to implement suggestions in later writing assignments--for example, by revising a major paper for subsequent evaluation or by writing several similar papers. See below for specific W-course criteria.

Posting UW W courses

Since winter 1995, Ws have been assigned to courses by departments using the W-course criteria described below. Departments add or remove a W from a course in the same manner as any other time schedule change, by making the change on time schedule work sheets, or by sending an email with the request to the Time Schedule Office. If a W is posted on a course through the seventh week of the quarter, the course will be posted on the students' records as a W course. After the seventh week of the quarter, the instructor should instead award a W to each student using the W circle on the grade sheet.

Before winter 1995, a list of approved W courses for each quarter was prepared by the Arts and Sciences W-Course Committee. If a W course offered before winter 1995 is not properly recorded on a student's transcript, contact Scott Winter at Undergraduate Advising.

Backdating UW courses

Students may use the W-Course Petition form, also available at the Undergraduate Advising office, to request that a W be posted on a completed UW course which met the W-course criteria but was not so posted. The student must provide documentation in the form of the graded papers, the course syllabus, or the instructor's signature on the petition. The form is to be used only for courses completed in a previous quarter. For a course in progress, the student should contact the instructor. Instructors can award Ws to individual students when grades are submitted at the end of the quarter.

The current W-course criteria, adopted in spring 1994, are more liberal than the previous W-course criteria. In particular, before spring 1994 the writing assignments in a W course had to be graded by the professor; this effectively limited the class size of W courses to 50 or less. The new W-course criteria are retroactive. A student who completed a UW course which did not meet the criteria in effect when the course was offered but meets the new criteria can use the W-course petition form to request that a W be posted on the course.

Transfer courses

Some local community colleges also use the W prefix and follow UW's W-course criteria. If there is a W in the course's title on the student's transcript, the admissions specialist who compiles the transfer evaluation should post a W on the transfer course. If the W wasn't posted by Admissions, the adviser can post it on SRF330.

All academic advisers may approve transfer courses that satisfy the W-course criteria. It's up to the individual adviser to decide whether to require any documentation; most advisers accept the student's description of the transfer course's writing assignments. Advisers unfamiliar with the W-course criteria may refer students to Undergraduate Advising. The W-course petition form, used to backdate Ws on UW courses, is not used for transfer courses.

To post a W on a transfer course, advisers use the SRF330 screen. Enter a W in the W field for the course and Send.

See below for information about the Transfer Associate Degree Agreement.

1-credit waiver

If an Arts and Sciences student completes only nine credits of additional writing, the adviser may approve a waiver of one credit of the additional writing requirement. For this to appear on a DARS audit or a DARS graduation application, a DARS exception is necessary. The adviser can either submit the exception or send a request to dars@u.washington.edu

Grades required

Any passing grade in a writing-intensive course, including 0.7, is acceptable toward the additional writing requirement. As of autumn 1985, courses taken at the UW to fulfill any graduation requirement, including additional writing, cannot be taken Satisfactory/Not Satisfactory (S/NS).

Transfer pass-fail courses

A transferred course taken under a student-option pass-fail system may be counted toward the additional writing requirement only if it was taken before the student matriculated at the UW.

A transferred course that was available only on a non-graded basis is automatically acceptable, whether taken before or after matriculation at the UW. The course should appear on the transfer evaluation with a grade of CR (rather than S).

UW courses taken S/NS before matriculation at the UW campus granting the student's degree may also be used to satisfy the additional writing requirement.

Overlaps and restrictions

Courses taken to satisfy the additional writing requirement may also count toward any other graduation requirement, including the student's major, except no course may count toward both the English composition requirement and the additional writing requirement. A course's credits may, however, be split between those two requirements. For example, a student who transfers a 6-credit English composition course may use 5 credits to meet the English composition requirement and apply the remaining 1 credit toward the additional writing requirement.

Exemptions

Postbaccalaureate students

Students who have already completed a bachelor's degree at the UW or elsewhere are exempt from the University (and Arts and Sciences) additional writing requirement.

Proficiency tests

There is no test for exemption from the additional writing requirement.

Transfer Associate Degree Agreement

Students who enter under the Transfer Associate Degree Agreement are not exempt from the additional writing requirement.

Registering for W courses

W courses are designated in the quarterly Time Schedule with the notation WRITING or OPTIONAL "W" COURSE.

Whether or not a course is a W course depends on the nature of the writing assignments, which can change from quarter to quarter and instructor to instructor. In fact, different sections of the same course in a given quarter may or may not all be designated W courses. For this reason, there is no list of permanent W courses.

Students and advisers can generate a list of open W courses using the General Education Course Requirement Search.

Optional W courses

Some courses are designed so that students may, if they wish, complete additional writing assignments and earn a W for the course. For example, if the writing requirement is a major paper, students may be given the option of doing a draft and a revision to earn a W. Optional W courses are designated in the quarterly Time Schedule with the notation OPTIONAL "W" COURSE.

The instructor will indicate the students who completed the W requirement by marking the W circle on the grade sheet for each student at the end of the quarter.

Ws by special arrangement

Many students make special arrangements with an instructor to have a course count as a W course, even though it is not designated as a W course in the Time Schedule.

If a student is taking a course that requires extensive writing but is not posted as a W course, the student can discuss with the professor the possibility of earning a W for the course. The professor can award a W to an individual student in a course by marking in the W circle on the grade sheet. Or, as described above, the professor may decide to post a W on the course so that all students receive a W.

It is also possible for the student and the professor to make an arrangement in which the student will complete the extra work required to meet the W-course criteria. For example, a 10-page paper with no revision required is not sufficient to meet the W-course criteria; but a 10-page paper which is graded by the professor and then revised and resubmitted does meet the W criteria. Again, the professor awards the W on the grade sheet at the end of the quarter.

W-course criteria

A W course must require at least 10-15 pages of graded, out-of-class writing, in the form of a long paper with a required revision or two or more shorter papers.

  • Papers may be graded by professors, instructors, TAs, and/or readers.
  • Students should receive some feedback on their writing; that is, comments on papers should not be restricted to content only.
  • Revisions do not count in the total number of pages of writing. Typical writing assignments:
    • one 10-15 page paper with a required revision
    • three similar 5-page papers
    • two short book reviews and one longer paper
  • Take-home exams do not count toward the 10-15 page total, unless students are given ample time for thoughtful writing and revision, and exams are graded for writing (organization, clarity of expression) as well as content.
  • In-class writing does not count toward the 10-15 page total.
  • Creative writing and verse writing do not count toward the 10-15 page total.
  • Journals and annotated bibliographies do not count toward the 10-15 page total.
  • Papers may be written in foreign languages if the work is graded primarily for content and organization.
  • The amount of writing required for a W is not determined by the number of credits assigned to the course. These criteria apply to all courses, even those assigned only one or two credits.

Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning

Freshmen entering the UW autumn 1985 or later, and transfer students entering the UW autumn 1987 or later, are required to complete one course from the Universityquantitative/symbolic reasoning (Q/SR) list. Normally 5 credits are required, but the 4-credit courses on the list also satisfy the requirement.

Arts and Sciences requirement

Students who start college anywhere in autumn 1985 or later and graduate from the UW College of Arts and Sciences must complete the University Q/SR requirement. (Note that Arts and Sciences does not allow a two-year grace period for transfer students in this instance; also note that Arts and Sciences uses the date the student started college, not the date the student entered the UW.) Students who started college before autumn 1985 are eligible for an earlier "proficiency" requirement, described in Pre-1985 General Education and Basic Skills Requirements. See Determining quarter of entry if the date on which the student started college isn't clear.

Other colleges

Each college has structured its requirements to meet or exceed the University Q/SR requirement. Some colleges require specific courses to meet the requirement. See General Education and Basic Skills Requirements of UW Schools and Colleges. Each school or college of the University decides for itself to what extent it will follow the policy of Arts and Sciences in applying requirements to students who began college before 1985.

Q/SR courses

The list of approved Q/SR courses is maintained by Undergraduate Advising.

Transfer courses

Q/SR courses require students to demonstrate competency in using mathematical or logical methods to solve applied problems. Transfer courses of 4 or more credits may count toward the Q/SR requirement if they are evaluated as exact equivalents of courses on the list, if they appear in the Equivalency Guide with a Q, or if they transfer as MATH 1XX or STAT 1XX (or 2XX, etc.). Advisers may approve other transfer courses of 4 or more credits if they are similar to courses on the Q/SR list. The adviser should post a "Q" on the course using the SRF330 screen.

Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate

A number of Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate test scores receive credit awards for courses that satisfy the Q/SR requirement. See the AP tables and IB tables.

Students who submitted International Baccalaureate scores before summer 2003 were awarded 5 quarter credits for each Higher Level subject in which a score of 5 or higher was earned. This was generally recorded as, for example, 5 credits of MATH 999. This 999 IB credit in Mathematics, Mathematics and Computing, and Computing Studies may be used to satisfy the Q/SR requirement.

Grades required

Any passing grade in a Q/SR course, including 0.7, is acceptable.

Pass-fail

As of autumn 1985, courses taken at the UW to fulfill any graduation requirement, including quantitative/symbolic reasoning, cannot be taken Satisfactory/Not Satisfactory (S/NS).

A transferred course taken under a student-option pass-fail system may be counted toward the Q/SR requirement only if it was taken before the student matriculated at the UW.

A transferred course that was available only on a non-graded basis is automatically acceptable, whether taken before or after matriculation at the UW. The course should appear on the transfer evaluation with a grade of CR (rather than S).

UW courses taken S/NS before matriculation at the UW campus granting the student's degree may also be used to satisfy the Q/SR requirement.

Overlaps and restrictions

The course used to satisfy the Q/SR requirement may also count toward the Areas of Knowledge requirement and/or the student's major, when applicable.

Non-credit courses, such as MATH 098, cannot count toward the Q/SR requirement. (Note also that MATH 100, 102, 103, and 120 are not on the Q/SR list.)

Exemptions

Postbaccalaureate students

Students who have already completed a bachelor's degree at the UW or elsewhere are exempt from the University (and Arts and Sciences) Q/SR requirement.

Transfer Associate Degree Agreement

A student who enters under the Transfer Associate Degree Agreement is not exempt from the Q/SR requirement solely on the basis of having earned the degree. The student must complete a course, either before or after transfer, from the Q/SR list.

Admission deficiency

A student is deficient in mathematics if s/he lacks the University admission requirement of three high school years (units) of college-preparatory mathematics. The courses (and the minimum required grade in each) which will remove a math admission deficiency are listed under Removal of a High School Subject Deficiency. Normally, a student must remove a math deficiency before matriculation at the UW.

A passing score on a math placement test does not remove a math admission deficiency. Coursework is required.

Courses taken to remove high school core deficiencies may be taken S/NS. A course taken to remove a high school math deficiency may count toward the Q/SR (and/or AoK) requirement if the course is not a noncredit course, if it was taken for a grade, and if it appears on the Q/SR (and/or AoK) list.

Foreign Language

The University has no foreign language requirement, aside from the admission requirement of two years of one foreign language in high school.

Arts and Sciences requirement

Students graduating from the College of Arts and Sciences must demonstrate proficiency through the third-quarter level of a foreign language. Students who start college anywhere in autumn 1985 or later and graduate from the UW College of Arts and Sciences must complete the foreign language requirement described in this AIF. Students who started college before autumn 1985 are eligible for an earlier "proficiency" requirement, described in Pre-1985 General Education and Basic Skills Requirements. See Determining quarter of entry if the date when the student started college isn't clear.

Completion of the Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement

Proficiency through the third quarter

Students must demonstrate proficiency through the third-quarter level of a foreign language, either by completion of the third quarter of a foreign language with a grade of at least 2.0 or placement into the fourth college quarter (see Placement tests). Courses designed primarily for conversational practice (e.g., GERMAN 150) do not count toward the proficiency requirement.

Satisfying the requirement with higher-level coursework

A student who begins college language study at the fourth-quarter level, or higher, and successfully completes the course (0.7 grade or higher; for S/NS see below), has satisfied the foreign language requirement. Such a student may count the course, and any additional coursework in the language, toward VLPA. Note that placement into the fourth quarter, by itself, satisfies the requirement. For students who place at this level or higher, coursework is not required.

"Higher-level" coursework includes language instruction at the level of the fourth quarter or higher, or a literature course in which the literature is read in the original language (even if the course itself is conducted in English). Basically, whether or not a course qualifies is determined by common sense. If the student has demonstrated, by successfully completing the course, that s/he is familiar with the vocabulary and syntax of another language at a level comparable to at least the end of the third quarter of the language, the requirement has been satisfied.

Conversation courses, even if upper-division, cannot be used to establish foreign language proficiency.

Foreign study

199 (foreign study) credit in a foreign language (such as FRENCH 199) is always language instruction. If the student completes at least 12 credits with a grade of at least 2.0, the credit satisfies the foreign language requirement. DARS has been programmed to recognize this.

If a student has earned credit for first-year foreign language courses, the first 15 credits of these courses and foreign study 199 (all in the same language, of course) should be counted toward the A&S foreign language requirement. Any credits in excess of 15 can be counted toward VLPA. For example, if a student who has completed FRENCH 101, 102 also has 12 credits of FRENCH 199, FRENCH 101, 102 and 5 credits of the FRENCH 199 should count toward the foreign language requirement, and the remaining 7 credits of FRENCH 199 can count toward VLPA.

299 foreign study credit is usually, but not always, second-year foreign language study. It is usually posted as VLPA in the Course Catalog but will not count as second-year foreign language unless the adviser for the department offering the course makes or requests a DARS exception, after discussing course content with the student. The department adviser may also flag 299 credit as I&S or even NW, if appropriate.

Transfer courses

The foreign language requirement is met by completion of any three-quarter or two-semester introductory foreign language sequence totalling at least 12 quarter credits. If a student has skipped part of the sequence, it is the level completed rather than the number of credits earned that is important. Transfer X credits (such as FRENCH 1XX) may be counted toward the foreign language requirement, if they represent language instruction and not courses devoted primarily to literature in translation or conversational practice.

A two-semester language sequence satisfies the requirement if sequence totals 8 semester credits (= 12 quarter credits). Normally, such a sequence should be posted as 101 (4), 102 (4), 103 (4). If you see one posted as 101 (5), 102 (5), 1XX (2), contact the Office of Admissions and ask that the evaluation be changed. DARS will not recognize a first-year language course as satisfying the foreign language requirement unless it is at least 4 credits and the student earned a grade of at least 2.0. If a student completed only the second semester of a language, it should be posted as 102 (2), 103 (4).

Foreign language courses that transfer as UW 1XX must be flagged by an adviser as "F" using SRF330. Only the third quarter of the sequence needs to be flagged. Again, the course must be at least 4 credits and the student must have earned a grade of at least 2.0.

American Sign Language

American Sign Language (ASL) counts for admission, foreign language, and VLPA requirements in exactly the same ways as any other language. ASL is a language in its own right, and is different from Manual English, which does not satisfy foreign (i.e., non-English) language requirements.

Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate

Students with scores of three or higher on the appropriate advanced placement (AP) exam offered by the College Board will be awarded credit for second-year language courses that satisfy the foreign language requirement. For information about the credit granted for specific AP scores see AP Credit Policies.

Students who complete International Baccalaureate foreign language exams are awarded second-year credit for Higher Level examination scores of 5, 6, or 7. (UW does not award credit for Standard Level examinations.) The second-year credit awarded will satisfy the Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement and may also count toward VLPA. For specific awards see the IB Credit Table.

IB scores submitted before summer 2003 were awarded 5 quarter credits for each Higher Level subject in which a score of 5 or higher was earned. This is generally recorded as, for example, FRENCH 999. This counts toward Arts and Sciences college requirements as if it were equivalent to the fourth quarter of the language, and can be used both to satisfy the foreign language requirement and to count toward VLPA. FRENCH 999 can't be used for placement.

The current IB awards for subject exams are retroactive, but either the student or the adviser must contact the Office of Admissions to request the update. This may not be necessary if the student's score was 5, since the old and new awards are the same number of credits and satisfy the same requirements, but a student whose score was 6 or 7 would receive additional foreign language credit.

Grades required

A student must earn a 2.0 or higher in the third-quarter foreign language course. If taken after matriculation at the UW, the course may not be taken Satisfactory/Not Satisfactory(S/NS). A student can present less than a 2.0 or even S grades in the first two quarters of the language; it is only the grade in the third-quarter course that determines if the requirement has been satisfied. If the third-quarter course is transferred from another college, the grade must be at least 2.0 or C (not C-).

Pass-fail transfer courses

The foreign language requirement may be satisfied with a third-quarter or second-semester transferred course taken under a student-option pass-fail system only if the course was taken before the student matriculated at the UW.

Courses taken as a nonmatriculated student

The foreign language requirement may be satisfied with a third-quarter UW course taken S/NS if the course was successfully completed before the student matriculated at the UW.

Grade required if the requirement is met with a fourth-quarter course

If a student earns below a 2.0 in the third quarter but later passes the fourth quarter (or a more advanced course) with at least a 0.7, the foreign language requirement is satisfied. An "S" grade in the fourth-quarter course is also acceptable. The student may also count the fourth-quarter language course toward Areas of Knowledge, if appropriate, and if the course is taken for a regular grade. (Courses taken S/NS cannot count toward Areas of Knowledge.)

In some instances, a student may meet the A&S foreign language requirement by taking a two-quarter introductory language sequence followed by a course at the second-year level. Examples of this include:

  • GREEK 300, 301 (Accelerated Greek) plus GREEK 305 (Attic Prose)
  • HEBR 414, 415 (Elementary Biblical Hebrew) plus HEBR 426 (Biblical Hebrew Prose)
  • AKKAD 401, 402, 403 (Elementary Akkadian, 3 credits each) plus AKKAD 421 (Intermediate Akkadian, 3 credits)

In such cases - where the second-year level course is substituting for the third quarter of the language, which is not offered by the UW - the student must earn a grade of at least 2.0 in the second-year level course, and the course may not also count toward VLPA. In other words, the course is treated as if it were the third quarter of the language.

Placement and proficiency tests

The Testing Center, 440 Schmitz Hall, offers placement tests in Spanish, French, Italian, German, Japanese, and Korean. The Testing Center also offers proficiency testing in Arabic, Russian, Persian, Polish, Portuguese, Hebrew, Urdu, and Hindi. For placement in other languages the student should contact the department. For proficiency testing in languages not offered at the UW, see below.

Exemption by placement or proficiency test

A student who takes a UW foreign language placement test and places into the fourth quarter or higher is exempt from the Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement. No additional test or coursework is required.

Special proficiency tests are offered in Arabic, Russian, Persian, Polish, Portuguese, Hebrew, Urdu, and Hindi (by the Testing Center) and Chinese (by the Asian Languages and Literature department). A student who passes the test is exempt from the Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement. A student who wishes placement in Chinese should take the department's placement test, not the proficiency test.

A student who places into the fourth quarter or higher does not need to take any further action to satisfy the foreign language requirement. The Testing Center notifies the Graduation and Academic Records Office and DARS, and subsequent DARS reports should indicate that the student has satisfied the requirement. There will also be a notation on SRF310 and on the student's unofficial transcript. The notification occurs automatically for students who took the placement test in winter quarter 2002 or later. A student who placed into the fourth quarter or higher before winter 2002 should contact the Testing Center, which will start the notification process.

Continuing the foreign language taken in high school

A student who wishes to continue his/her high school foreign language must take a placement test, even if s/he wishes to start over at the first quarter. The student must enroll in the course into which s/he placed, and not in a higher-level or lower-level course.

The placement test requirement applies only to the student's high school "language of admission," the language used to meet UW's high school core admission requirement. If a student was admitted with a foreign language deficiency (less than two years of any one language completed), no language is coded as the language of admission, and a placement test is not required if the student wishes to start the language over with the first quarter. For example, a student whose only high school foreign language was one year of French could register for FRENCH 101 without taking the placement test.

If a student took two languages in high school, the one in which the student completed the most units is the language of admission. If the student took each language for an equal number of units, the most recent language is the language of admission. If a student who took two languages in high school wishes to have the other language posted as the language of admission, the student must obtain a letter of agreement from the department offering the language the student is switching from and submit the letter to the Admissions Office. The letter is required because the student is, essentially, asking for permission to start over, for credit and without a placement test, at the beginning of a language already taken in high school.

Continuing a foreign language taken in college

A student who already has college credit in a language may register for the next quarter of the language without a placement test. The student is also permitted to repeat a course or even start over with the first quarter, again without a placement test. Such a student may, of course, take a placement test if s/he chooses-as might be a good idea if, for example, the previous coursework was several quarters ago and the student wants to determine his/her current level in the language. In such a case the placement test score is not binding. When both a placement test score and posted courses in the language are available, the posted courses are used to determine eligibility. If the placement test score places the student higher than the posted college coursework, the student should contact the department offering the language for permission to enroll in the course.

Continuing a foreign language in which the student has only informal experience

Students with uncredited background in Chinese must answer an online questionnaire available at the Asian Languages and Literature department website, and must be interviewed by the department. A student who is fluent in Vietnamese but cannot read or write the language should contact the Asian L&L department and speak with the instructor. A student with other uncredited background in Vietnamese should take the Vietnamese placement test, offered once each quarter by the Asian L&L department.

A student who wishes to start French, Italian, Spanish, German, Japanese, or Korean above the first-quarter level based on uncredited experience with the language must take the placement test.

For other languages, contact the department.

Eligibility for placement tests

Except in the case of an applicant who needs testing to meet the University admission requirement, foreign language placement tests should be taken only after a student is admitted to the UW.

Repeating a placement test

French, Italian, and Spanish tests may be repeated after 6 months have passed. The Japanese test may be repeated once per quarter. The Korean and German tests can be taken twice in a 12-month period with a 75-day wait between tests.

Proficiency testing in languages not offered by the UW

Students who do not have an admissions deficiency in foreign language but who wish to meet the foreign-language graduation requirement by testing in a language that the University does not offer should be referred to Undergraduate Advising, 171 Mary Gates Hall. For some languages, there is already a person approved to administer tests; in others, it may be possible to find someone (preferably a University faculty or staff member who is a native speaker) who can be approved. The Graduation and Academic Records Office will be notified that the student has passed a test under approved testing arrangements. The results will then be posted on the student's permanent record and on the SRF310 screen in the Student Database.

If an applicant for admission to the UW has a foreign language admissions deficiency and needs testing, arrangements must be made through and approved by the Admissions Office.

The College of Arts and Sciences wishes to honor students' knowledge of languages it does not teach, particularly if it is the language of the student's ancestors. If no one is available to administer a test, Undergraduate Advising will arrange for the student to demonstrate his/her knowledge of the language. Demonstration will include such activities as a review of the student's background in and current use of the language, discussion of the syntax and other linguistic aspects of the language, speaking extemporaneously in the language, reading it aloud, translating from and to the language, and writing in it. Usually there will be some material to read that the student will not have seen before, but students are also encouraged to bring materials with them that they wish to use for the demonstration. A student who can demonstrate reasonable fluency in speaking, reading, and writing the language will be exempted from the foreign-language requirement.

The UW does not grant credit based on proficiency testing in languages not offered at the UW.

Eligibility for proficiency tests

Except in the case of an applicant who needs testing to meet the University admission requirement, foreign language proficiency tests may be taken only after a student is admitted to the UW. They may be taken either before or after a student has completed college coursework in the same topics.

If an applicant requests a proficiency test to remove a foreign language admission deficiency, arrangements must be made through the Admissions Office.

High school duplication

The basic rule for disallowing credit in the language of admission is that after matriculation at UW, a student who had two or more years of a language in high school will not receive credit for beginning that language over again with the first course (e.g., SPAN 101, JAPAN 111).

The policy applies only to students who began college in autumn 1987 or later. If a student began college before then and has lost credit, the error should be pointed out to Admissions and/or Graduation and Academic Records. (Note, however, that the question of when the student began college is decided by Admissions according to official records of transferred credit, and does not follow the more liberal policy that Undergraduate Advising uses in determining whether students are allowed to use the pre-1985 proficiency requirement.)

First-quarter language courses taken before matriculation

In autumn 1996 the policy described above was changed to allow credit so long as the student had not matriculated at the UW before the course was taken. The change is retroactive, but the records of students previously denied credit were not automatically updated. If an adviser notices that such a student should receive credit, the adviser should notify the Office of Admissions.

Recording the grade

When credit for the beginning-level course is taken away the grade remains visible on the transcript, but is not calculated into the student's GPA.

Two languages taken in high school

Because the Admissions Office codes only one language as the language of admission, a student who had two or more years of two languages in high school would be able to get credit for 101 (111) in one of them but not the other. Normally, the language coded as the language of admission will be the one that the student studied most, or, if the high-school units are equal, the one studied more recently. If the coding was done while senior-year language study was in progress, it may be appropriate to ask Admissions to revise the coding. (For example, if a student had Spanish in ninth and tenth grades and Japanese in eleventh and twelfth, but Spanish is coded as the language of admission, the coding could be changed to Japanese, and the student could receive credit for SPAN 101.) A change in coding can also be done with the specific approval of the language department offering the course whose credit is in question. For example, if the coding in the above case correctly showed Japanese as the language of admission because the study of it was more recent and was equal to the study of Spanish, the Asian Language department could-but is not obliged to-give approval to the Admissions Office to have the coding changed to Spanish, so that the student could receive credit for JAPAN 111.

Petitions

A student may petition the Arts and Sciences Graduation Committee to be allowed credit for the first quarter of the foreign language of admission, but such petitions are seldom, if ever, granted. The policy affects many students, and it would be difficult to make the case that one student should be given special treatment not available to others.

Native speakers

Exemption from the graduation and/or admission requirement

For purposes of exemption from the foreign-language graduation requirement (as well as for admission), a student is considered a native speaker of a foreign language if it was the language (or one of the languages) spoken in the home during the first six years of childhood and in which s/he received instruction in elementary school, through the seventh grade. Such students are exempt from the foreign-language requirement without taking a proficiency test. Students who immigrated too early in their school careers to meet the University's administrative definition of a "native speaker" may nevertheless be able to gain exemption by taking a test.

Starting with students admitted for winter quarter 2005, students who meet the University's definition of a native speaker will be coded so in the Student Data Base, and DARS will show that the student has satisfied the Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement. Prior to winter 2005, it was not always possible to tell from the information provided by the Admissions Office (screen 306 in the Student Data Base) whether a student met the University's definition, since the Admissions Office's focus was on recording at least one way in which the student met the foreign-language requirement for admission, rather than all ways. In these cases, the adviser may simply ask the student whether he/she attended school through the end of the seventh grade in his/her native language. Only if there is reason to doubt the student's word would it be necessary to ask for proof. Advisers should either make the exception or email the DARS (dars@u.washington.edu) office to have a notation added to the student's record that s/he is a native speaker of a specific language other than English.

If the student attended a school in which some of the instruction was in the native language and some was in English, the adviser should try to ascertain whether the student functioned as a native speaker in school, reading and writing in the language at the level of sophistication that might be expected if the school had been taught in that language only. The foreign-language requirement includes the assumption that a student should be able to read and write, as well as speak, a language other than English (at least at the level of a student who earns a 2.0 or higher in a 103-level college course). Students who did not finish seventh grade in their native language should be referred to the department offering the language for proficiency testing. If the University does not offer the language, or if there are unusual circumstances that might warrant special consideration, contact Undergraduate Advising.

Credit for courses in the native language

Native speakers of a language other than English are not normally allowed to earn credit for the first two years of college credits in their native language. Often they are allowed to earn credit at the third year and beyond; ultimately, however, the language department has the right to place the student at the appropriate level. Transfer credit for coursework in the first two years of the native language will be taken away by the Admissions Office. The enforcement of the restriction in UW courses (as well as the granting of exceptions for academically sound reasons) is the responsibility of the instructor and the language department. If the instructor allows the student to remain in the class without objection, credit will not later be taken away by the Registrar's Office.

Overlaps and restrictions

First-year foreign language courses cannot count simultaneously toward the foreign language requirement and Areas of Knowledge. In the language that is being used to meet the foreign language requirement, none of the 15-credit first-year sequence can be used toward Areas of Knowledge. Any additional credit beyond the first-year sequence can be counted for Areas of Knowledge, unless it is taken S/NS. This includes all credit at the fourth quarter and beyond, even if the student begins at that level. It also includes any supplemental credit at the first-year level, such as GERMAN 150 (conversation) or GERMAN 121, 122 (reading), which count for VLPA if the student has completed the 103 level of the language. (Credit for any course beyond the first year, except those designed primarily for conversational practice, also satisfies the foreign language requirement, even if the grade is "S" or is below 2.0.) For UW schools/colleges that do not require foreign language beyond the UW admission requirement, any first-year foreign language instruction credits can be counted toward VLPA if the student completes the third quarter of the language. An exception is the College of Engineering, which does not allow VLPA credit for first- and second-quarter language courses.

Courses used to satisfy the foreign language requirement can also count toward the student's major, if applicable.

Transfer Associate Degree Agreement

Students who enter under the Transfer Associate Degree Agreement are not exempt from the foreign language requirement solely on the basis of having earned the degree. Students who have completed foreign language courses and counted them toward Areas of Knowledge for the associate degree will, after transfer to the UW, need to count them toward the foreign language requirement instead (if their UW school/college requires foreign language). Because of this, such students usually need additional courses in Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts after transfer.

Students who enter under the Transfer Associate Degree Agreement who satisfy the foreign language requirement with coursework in one language (call it language A), or who are native speakers of a language other than English, can count toward VLPA any courses in a different foreign language (call it language B) taken before transfer to the UW-again, if the student satisfies the foreign language requirement with a different language than the one being counted toward VLPA. The student is allowed to count all foreign language B courses toward VLPA even if the community college allowed only some of the credits to count toward humanities.

Example: A student completes, as part of a transfer associate degree at a Washington community college, GERMAN 101, 102, 103 and FRENCH 101. The student then transfers to the UW. The student uses the GERMAN to satisfy the foreign language requirement and can count the FRENCH 101 toward VLPA.

Postbaccalaureate students

Students who have already completed a bachelor's degree at the UW or elsewhere are exempt from the foreign language requirement (both the University admission requirement and the Arts and Sciences graduation requirement).

Admission deficiency

A student is deficient in foreign language if s/he lacks the University admission requirement of two high school years (units) of a single foreign language. Completion of any foreign language instruction course at the second-quarter level or higher, with any passing grade, will remove a foreign language admission deficiency. Placement by the UW into the third quarter of a foreign language will also remove a foreign language admission deficiency. For more information see Removal of a High School Subject Deficiency.

Courses taken to remove a high school deficiency may count toward the foreign language requirement. The first two quarters of a language taken at the UW to remove admission deficiencies may be taken S/NS, but note that the third quarter of the language must be taken for a regular grade if it is to satisfy the foreign language graduation requirement.

Counting Specific Foreign Language Courses toward Requirements

199, 299

199 and 299 are used as numbers in some language departments for credit earned in study-abroad programs. Occasionally, other numbers are used as well.

199 (foreign study) credit in a foreign language (such as FRENCH 199) is always language instruction. If the student completes at least 12 credits with a grade of at least 2.0, the credit satisfies the foreign language requirement. DARS has been programmed to recognize this.

If a student has earned credit for first-year foreign language courses, the first 15 credits of these courses and foreign study 199 combined (all in the same language, of course) should be counted toward the A&S foreign language requirement. Any credits in excess of 15 can be counted toward VLPA. For example, if a student who has completed FRENCH 101, 102 also has 12 credits of FRENCH 199, FRENCH 101, 102 and 5 credits of the FRENCH 199 should count toward the foreign language requirement, and the remaining 7 credits of FRENCH 199 can count toward VLPA.

299 foreign study credit is usually, but not always, second-year foreign language study. It is usually posted as VLPA in the Course Catalog but will not count as second-year foreign language unless the adviser for the department offering the course makes or requests a DARS exception, after discussing course content with the student. The department adviser may also flag 299 credit as I&S or even NW, if appropriate.

Conversation courses

First-year foreign language conversation courses (e.g., GERMAN 150) count toward VLPA only if the student completes the third quarter of regular language instruction in the same language.

Foreign-language conversation courses beyond the first-year level (e.g., GERMAN 250, FRENCH/ITAL 327, FRENCH 237, FRENCH/SPAN 337) may be used for VLPA even if no other courses in the language are taken. They may not be used, however, to establish proficiency for the foreign language requirement, or to qualify for UW advanced placement credit.

15-credit intensive language programs

A student who has completed first-year language courses in addition to a 15-credit intensive course is allowed only 15 credits total in first-year language instruction.

In the past, exceptions were made for SPAN 134 and FRENCH 134 that are no longer in effect. See below.

Heritage courses

Some language departments at the UW offer "heritage" language courses for students who have spoken the language in the home or have other formal or informal background in the language. These courses more-or-less parallel the regular language courses. A placement test may be required. In general, the heritage courses are appropriate for students who have some experience speaking the language but need to work on grammar, reading, and writing. Students should contact the department offering the courses for more information.

The heritage Chinese sequence is an accelerated sequence. The second-quarter of the sequence, CHIN 112, is at an equivalent level to the third-quarter of the standard sequence. Therefore, completion of CHIN 112 with a grade of 2.0 or higher will satisfy the Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement. CHIN 113 is treated the same as a second-year language course. Therefore, completion of CHIN 113 with any grade will satisfy the foreign language requirement and the credits can apply towards the VLPA requirement.

Foreign language sequences of less than 15 credits

The UW offers a few foreign language sequences in which each course is 3 credits rather than 5. In a few languages we offer only one or two 5-credit courses.

To satisfy the Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement, a student must complete at least 12 quarter credits of one language (or complete the last course in a sequence of at least 12 quarter credits). If the UW offers fewer than 12 credits in a language, those courses cannot be used to satisfy the foreign language requirement.

In some cases we offer additional coursework in the same language that can substitute for the remainder of the first-year sequence. Elementary and intermediate Akkadian, for example, is offered as a sequence of six 3-credit courses (AKKAD 401, 402, 403, 421, 422, 423). Completion of 12 credits, or AKKAD 421, will satisfy the requirement. Biblical Hebrew is offered only as a sequence of two 5-credit courses (HEBR 414, 415), but we also offer several Biblical Hebrew literature courses for students who have completed HEBR 415 (HEBR 426, 427, and 428). One of the literature courses can be taken to complete the foreign language requirement.

When an intermediate or advanced course is used to substitute for the final quarter of an elementary language sequence in this manner, the course is treated as if it were part of the first-year language sequence. A grade of at least 2.0 is required, and the course does not count toward VLPA. (Note that this is different from a situation in which the student skips the third quarter of a language and successfully completes the next course. For example, a student who completes FRENCH 101 and 102, skips 103, and successfully completes 201, has satisfied the foreign language requirement and is allowed to count FRENCH 201 as VLPA.)

Notes about specific courses

Asian Languages and Literature

Indian 403 (Urdu): Since this course has a prerequisite of HINDI 313 (or, alternately, a speaking knowledge of Urdu), it counts toward requirements in the same way as HINDI 321 (that is, it counts as if it were the first quarter of the second year of instruction).

Japanese 121: This course is no longer offered. It was similar to SPAN/FRENCH 110 (below), covering the material in JAPAN 111 and 112 in a one-quarter, 5-credit review.

Vietnamese 214, Thai 410: These courses are designed to teach reading and writing skills to students who already have a speaking knowledge of the language. (See also SPAN 204.) For purposes of graduation requirements, these courses can be considered equivalent to second-year language instruction. The course establishes that the student is beyond the first-year level and thus satisfies the foreign language requirement; in addition, the credit for the course counts for VLPA. Placement into the course is not sufficient to satisfy the foreign language requirement; the student must actually complete the course (with any passing grade; a 2.0 is not required.) The student does not receive any advanced placement credit.

Classics

Latin/Greek 300, 301: This is not a 10-credit way to meet a 15-credit requirement, as the course descriptions in the Course Catalog make clear. The intention is that students would take 300 and 301 to get to 305 more efficiently, and then take 305. Thus 300 and 301 by themselves do not automatically satisfy the foreign-language requirement. Likewise, a student who has satisfied the foreign language requirement in another way may not use LATIN/GREEK 300, 301 for VLPA unless he/she also takes a more advanced course.

In such cases - where the advanced course is substituting for the third quarter of the language, which is not offered by the UW - the student must earn a grade of at least 2.0 in the advanced course, and the course may not also count toward VLPA. In other words; for students who take LATIN/GREEK 300, 301; 305 is treated as if it were the third quarter of the language.

Germanics

German 104: GERMAN 104 is not currently offered. It is a self-paced first-year German course, for which the student can earn from 0 to 15 credits. An adviser should assume that the first five credits of 104 on a student's transcript are a duplication of 101 unless the German department has records to the contrary.

German 111: This course is a one-quarter preparation for GERMAN 103 for students who are already familiar with German but are not prepared to take 102 without a review of the material presented in 101. Unlike SPAN and FRENCH 110, it is also available to highly motivated beginners with other language background who want to prepare for 103 in one quarter. Credit for 111 (in contrast with 101) is allowed for students who had two years of German in high school. Students may receive credit for 101 and 111, but not for 111 and 102.

German 150; 121, 122: These conversation (150) and reading (121,122) courses are supplementary to the regular 101-103 program, offering additional (or alternative) practice. Credit is allowed for these courses over and above the credit earned in the regular language-learning program. These courses are subject to the restriction on other first-year language courses: they cannot be used for VLPA unless the student completes 103 or a course beyond the first year. Since they are supplemental to the regular first-year program, however, they may be used for VLPA even if the other first-year courses are being used for the foreign language requirement. GERMAN 121, 122 does not satisfy the foreign language requirement.

Near Eastern Languages and Civilization

Akkadian 401, 402, 403: Unlike most foreign language courses at the UW, AKKAD 401, 402, and 403, Elementary Akkadian, are 3 credits each. To satisfy the foreign language requirement, the student must complete AKKAD 421, Intermediate Akkadian. AKKAD 421 is also 3 credits; 12 credits is suffiecient to satisfy the requirement. Because AKKAD 421 is essentially substituting for the third quarter of the language, the student must earn a grade of at least 2.0 and may not also count AKKAD 421 toward VLPA.

Altaic 401, 402, 403: ALTAI 401, 402, 403 (3, 3, 3) is an introduction to written Mongolian. The sequence does not satisfy the Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement, nor does it count toward VLPA. ALTAI 415, 416, 417 (5, 5, 5), spoken Mongolian, does satisfy the foreign language requirement.

Arabic/Hebrew/Persian/Turkic/Turkish 471, 472, 473; Turkic 474, 475, 476; 481, 482, 483 : These were first-year language courses (now numbered 411, 412, 413-and TKIC 414, 415, 416 and 417, 418, 419). The numbers were created to put the courses at the 400 level so they would be available to both undergraduate and graduate students; later the numbering system in Near Eastern Languages and Civilization was reorganized. See the Duplicate Courses list for details.

Hebrew 414, 415: HEBR 414, 415 (5, 5) is a two-quarter sequence in Elementary Biblical Hebrew. The UW does not offer a third quarter. Students who wish to satisfy the Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement with HEBR 414, 415 must also take 426, a 5-credit literature course. Because 426 is substituting for the third quarter of the language, the student must earn a grade of at least 2.0 and may not also count the course toward VLPA. HEBR 427 or 428 (each list 426 as a prerequisite) may be substituted for 426.

Romance Languages and Literature

Spanish 104, 204: SPAN 104, which is no longer offered, can be counted toward requirements in the same way as SPAN 103. SPAN 204, also no longer offered, can be counted in the same way as 203, except that advanced-placement credit is not awarded for 202 if 204 was the student's first college-level Spanish course. (See VIET 214 and THAI 410.)

French/Spanish 110: These courses are one-quarter preparations for FRENCH/SPAN 103, for students who studied the language in high school but are not prepared to take 102 without a review of the material presented in 101. Admission is by placement test. The required score is somewhat lower than that for 102, although all students who place into 102 are also eligible to take 110 instead. Credit for 110 (in contrast with 101) is allowed for students who had two or more years of French/Spanish in high school. Students who have received credit for either 101 or 102 will not receive credit for 110, and vice versa. Compare with GERMAN 111.

Spanish 121, [122, 123,] 134 (2003 on): The SPAN 121 sequence, and the 15-credit intensive SPAN 134, approach language instruction with a technique called "immersion" in videotaped language settings. SPAN 121, 122, 123, however, parallels 101, 102, 103, and credit is not allowed for both sequences. A student who already has credit for SPAN 101 (or 121) will receive only 10 credits for SPAN 134, a student who already has credit for SPAN 102 will receive only 5 credits for SPAN 134, etc. In addition, a student who completed at least two years of Spanish in high school would not receive credit for SPAN 121 and would receive only 10 credits for SPAN 134.

Spanish 121, [122, 123,] 134 (Pre-2003): The policy above applies to students who took SPAN 134 summer 2003 or later, or the SPAN 121 sequence autumn 2003 or later. Previously, students received credit for 121, or all 15 credits for 134, even if they had already taken 101, or even if they had two years of Spanish in high school. The treatment of SPAN 134 was a special case resulting from the special treatment of 121; for 15-credit intensive language offerings other than SPAN 134 (such as GERMAN 100, RUSS 150, SWED 150, JAPAN 134, and ITAL 134), a student always received only 10 additional credits if s/he had two years of the language in high school or had already received credit for 101/111. For the FRENCH 121 series and 134 intensive course, see below.

Spanish 314: For purposes of graduation requirements, SPAN 314 can be considered equivalent to 301. Therefore, the course establishes that the student is beyond the 103 level and thus satisfies the foreign language requirement; in addition, the credit for the course counts toward VLPA. The student does not, however, receive AP credit for skipping over 202 and 203.

French 121, [122, 123,] 134 (1997 on): FRENCH 134 is an intensive version of 101, 102, and 103. Beginning in summer 1997, matriculated UW students who take FRENCH 134 receive only 10 credits if they had two or more years of French in high school, and receive a maximum of 15 credits for FRENCH 101 and 134. FRENCH 121, 122, 123 parallels the FRENCH 101, 102, 103 sequence and is treated in the same way toward requirements.

French 121, [122, 123,] 134 (Pre-1997): Through spring 1996, FRENCH 121, 122, 123, and 134 used the same "immersion" approach as the pre-2003 Spanish courses described above, and can be treated in the same manner.

Students who took FRENCH 134 in summer 1996 are treated as if they had taken the old immersion version of the course, because there was no advance warning given to students or advisers that the course had changed. FRENCH 121, 122, 123 was not offered from autumn 1996 through spring 2003.

Italian 111, 113: ITAL 111 is not a review course like FRENCH/SPAN 110 or GERMAN 111. It is a ten-credit beginning course, offered autumn quarter, exactly equivalent to ITAL 101 and 102. Students who complete it would continue with the section of 103 that is offered as a follow-up in the winter. ITAL 113 is exactly equivalent to 102 and 103, and is offered winter quarter as a follow-up for students who took 101 in the autumn. (Note that students would not normally take both 111 and 113, but if they did so, they would lose five credits because they would have covered the material in ITAL 102 twice.)

Portuguese 105: This course has a prerequisite of at least Spanish 203 or equivalent, and is designed to allow students who already know Spanish to cover first-year Portuguese in one quarter. After completing it, students may continue with PORT 201. The course does not, in itself, satisfy the foreign-language requirement; it is intended for people who would already have met the requirement in Spanish. Students taking PORT 105 would not usually take 101, 102, or 103, either before or after, but in any case, a student may earn no more than fifteen credits from PORT 101, 102, 103, and 105 combined.   

Scandinavian Studies

Scandinavian 490: From 1994 through 1997, SCAND 490 was used for special offerings of Estonian, Latvian, and Lithuanian with students studying different languages at different levels. Applicability of the credit toward requirements works the same as for any other language: if the student completed the the third-quarter level of one of the languages, s/he may use the credit for either the foreign-language requirement (assuming a grade of at least 2.00) or VLPA. The program led eventually to the regular offering of LATV/LITH/ESTO 101, 102, and 103.

The Foreign Language Requirement: Students with Documented Disabilities

When deafness, speech impairment, or a certified learning disability would interfere significantly with a student's study of foreign language, s/he can petition to be allowed to substitute coursework about a foreign culture for language requirements. Either or both of two separate requirements may be involved-removal of a high-school language deficiency, and/or satisfaction of the Arts and Sciences foreign language graduation requirement. The foreign language graduation requirement applies to students earning bachelor's degrees from the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Social Work.

Categories of students allowed to substitute

Students granted permission by the University at the time of admission

Very few students are admitted to the University without the foreign language Core Subject Requirement: high school coursework through the second-year level or college coursework through the second-quarter level. Of those few admitted with a foreign language deficiency, most are required to make up the deficiency by taking coursework at UW through the second quarter of a language (e.g., FRENCH 102). A small number of students admitted with deficiencies, however, are given special permission to substitute foreign-culture courses for foreign language courses because of deafness, speech impairment, or a certified learning disability. Decisions are made on the basis of documentation supplied by the student, together with a recommendation from the Disability Resources for Students office. The foreign language requirement is never simply waived; fulfillment by substitute courses is required.

Students with permission to substitute culture courses for language courses to remove an admission deficiency are automatically granted permission to substitute culture courses for the Arts and Sciences (and Social Work) foreign language graduation requirement as well. Usually this means that in addition to the 10 credits of culture courses that remove the admission deficiency, the student takes five more credits to meet the graduation requirement.

Students petitioning their college after admission

A student who has already been admitted and wishes to make the case at a later time that s/he should be allowed to substitute culture courses because of a disability must petition his/her college for permission. For students in the College of Arts and Sciences, this takes the form of a petition to the Arts and Sciences Graduation Committee, even if the student is planning to change into another college of the University before graduation.

If the student has an admission deficiency, the Graduation Committee (or the student's college, if s/he is not in Arts and Sciences) will make a recommendation and refer the matter to the Faculty Council on Academic Standards' Subcommittee on Admission and Graduation, which will decide for the University.

If the student has no admission deficiency but is asking for permission to substitute culture courses for the graduation requirement, the matter can be decided at the college level and will not be referred to the University level. The student should anticipate, in the petition, the question of how it happens that s/he was able to meet the admission requirement at an earlier time, but now is not able to complete the graduation requirement.

Petitioning

What to include in the petition

Petitions should be submitted on a Graduation Petition form and must include at least two items:

  1. A letter of endorsement of the documented disability, from the UW Disability Resources for Students office. Petitions submitted without this endorsement will almost certainly be denied.
  2. The proposed list of courses to be substituted for foreign language, including course titles and a discussion of the intended theme of the combination. (See Focus, below.)

The student should begin the petition process as early as possible in his/her college career. A student already has documentation of a disability should petition while it is relatively recent. Since many of the possible substitute courses are offered infrequently, the more time the student has to complete them, the better. The student should petition BEFORE taking the proposed substitution courses.

The sample course combinations listed at the end of this AIF are intended as examples only. Each student must submit for approval his/her own individual plan, usually to be worked out in consultation with the adviser who signs the petition on behalf of the student's major department.

Number of credits required

For removal of an admission deficiency, 10 credits are required (even if the student did complete one year of language in high school). For the foreign language graduation requirement, 15 credits are required. The 10 credits used to remove a deficiency can also be counted toward the 15 credits used for the graduation requirement, so long as the student takes them for a numerical grade and earns at least a 2.0 in each one.

Effect of previous language study on the number of credits required

Completion in high school of part of the two years of language study normally required for admission (for example, one year) does not decrease the number of college credits required to remove the admission deficiency. If the student were taking a language, s/he would presumably need to start over at the beginning and take 10 credits (101 and 102), so the required substitution is also 10 credits. Likewise, the foreign language graduation requirement is 15 credits, regardless of any high-school units of language completed.

If a student has earned college credit for language study, however, the language credits may be included as part of the proposed list of courses. In some cases, even a grade below 2.0 might be accepted; this will be decided on an individual basis, when the proposal itself is considered. For example, if a student earned a 1.9 in SPAN 101, s/he could propose SPAN 101 and HSTAA 381, 382 (10 credits of Latin American history) for the 15-credit foreign language graduation requirement. Note that the language course must be in the language associated with the culture being studied.

Transfer courses

Students may, if they wish, include transfer courses in their proposed list of substitute courses. When submitting the petition, the student should include a catalog description, syllabus, and/or summary of the course.

Focus of the proposed courses

In general, the proposed courses should involve a focus on a particular culture or linguistically closely related cultures, and the student should explain in his/her petition why the particular courses have been chosen. The purpose of the requirement is not simply to insist upon 10 or 15 credits from a list of courses about other countries; a proposal for a course about Africa, one about India, and one about Mexico will not be approved. Three courses specifically about Mexico will probably be approved, but there should still be some explanation. If the proposal is for a course about Spain, one about Mexico, and one about South America, there should ideally be an intellectual connection involved in the choice, other than the fact that all three areas are Spanish-speaking.

The inclusion of courses that touch upon the culture as part of a broader coverage should also be justified in the petition. For example, the student should explain in his/her petition why s/he chooses MUSIC 316, which covers a wide range of Asian music, as part of a proposal focusing on China, rather than some other course that is about China alone. The committee will be willing to consider personal or practical considerations, such as the constraints of the student's schedule and the limitations of the University's course offerings, as well as intellectual ones.

Since the requirement is meant to ensure that the student is exposed to a culture that is linguistically different from his own, proposed courses focusing on English-speaking countries such as Great Britain, Canada, or Australia are not acceptable.

Learning disabilities

Students who want to petition based on a learning disability must submit a report from a testing agency approved by the UW Disability Resources for Students office. The UW does not provide testing. Private testing is expensive, and students should always contact Disability Resources for Students before selecting an agency. DRS will not endorse test results from an agency with which they are not familiar.

Where to submit the petition

Petitions from students who have already been admitted, including plans for proposed substitutions, should be submitted to the Arts and Sciences Graduation Committee. Although ultimate authority for the requirements rests with the Faculty Council on Academic Standards (in the case of deficiency removal) or with the college that the student is graduating from (in the case of graduation requirements for students in Arts and Sciences and Social Work), administration of the requirements will normally be carried out by the Arts and Sciences Graduation Committee because the College of Arts and Sciences offers the substitute courses (as well as foreign language courses themselves).

Changes in the list of courses approved

Although the student may submit a supplementary petition later to change courses, a proposed plan is required at the outset to make clear to the student the nature of the alternative commitment that s/he is entering into. Petitions for change must be presented to the Arts and Sciences Graduation Committee in writing on a graduation-petition form signed by the student's adviser. To avoid later petitions for change, the student could propose a range of choices. For example, a student could propose to complete HSTAS 201 and 202, plus five additional credits from among HSTAS 401, 402, 403, PHIL 386, and RELIG 352.

Grades required

For the foreign language graduation requirement, the student must earn a 2.0 or higher in each substitute course used toward the 15-credit requirement. (Note that this differs from the requirement for foreign language courses, where, because the courses are sequential, the grades for the first two are immaterial if the third course is 2.0 or above.) If the student is removing an admission deficiency but not meeting the Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement, a grade of 0.7 or higher will remove the deficiency. To remove a deficiency (but not to satisfy the foreign language graduation requirement), the student may take the courses on a Satisfactory/Not-satisfactory basis; note that 2.0 is required to earn an "S".

Overlap with other requirements

Foreign-culture courses being used for the foreign language graduation requirement cannot be counted toward Areas of Knowledge requirements. If they happen to be in the student's major department, however, they can count for both the major and the language requirement. (In other words, culture courses being substituted for the foreign language requirement are subject to the same restrictions as foreign language courses themselves.) There is no such restriction on courses used to remove an admission deficiency; in most cases, these will also be used for the foreign language graduation requirement, but if not, and if the courses normally count for Areas of Knowledge, the student can use them for both deficiency removal and the Areas requirement.

Examples of foreign culture courses

The student should thoroughly review the Course Catalog for potential courses in his/her area of interest. Students should be aware that many of the foreign-culture courses that would be acceptable are 300- and 400-level and may be quite difficult for a student with no related academic background; thus it may be necessary for the student to complete introductory coursework in addition to the proposed foreign-culture courses. Many courses are not offered regularly. The student should allow plenty of time to complete a proposed sequence of courses, and should consult with the departments involved about their projected course schedules.

Below are some examples of combinations of foreign culture courses that meet the spirit of the foreign language substitution policy. These are examples only. Each student's proposal will be considered on its own merits.

ANTH 313 (5)Peoples of Africa
ANTH 401 (3)West African Societies
ART H 205 (5)Survey of Tribal Art
MUSIC 427 (3)Music of Africa
  
CHIN 380 (5)Premodern Chinese Narrative in Translation
HSTAS 211 (5)History of Chinese Civilization
HSTAS 456 (5)Topics in Chinese Social History
  
HSTEU 431 (5)Germany: 1648-1914
HSTEU 432 (5)Germany: 1914-1945
GERMAN 353 (5)   Postwar Germany
  
ASIAN 205 (5)Literature and Culture of Japan from Tradition to Modernity
SISEA 423 (5)History of Modern Japan
SISEA 482 (5)Japanese Business and Technology
  
ANTH 418 (5)Indian Heritage of Mexico and Central America
ARCHY 304 (5)New World Prehistory
HSTAA 381 (5)Latin America: The Early Colonial Period
  
HIST 261 (5)Survey of the Muslim Near East
NEAR E 310 (5)Modern Near East Literatures in English Translation
SISME 400 (5)The Middle East in the Modern World
  
PHIL 386 (5)Introduction to the Philosophical Systems of India
RELIG 352 (5)Hinduism
RELIG 354 (5)Buddhism

Areas of Knowledge

See separate page.

Pre-1985 General Education and Basic Skills Requirements

In the College of Arts and Sciences, all students follow the current Areas of Knowledge requirement, regardless of the date of college entry.

The general education plan in effect before autumn 1985 was called the "green list." Green-list students were required to take 60 credits of "distribution" courses, 20 credits each in humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. Because the current Areas of Knowledge list includes many more courses than the green list, nearly all students are better off under the Areas of Knowledge requirement. For this reason, the green list is no longer maintained.

Because a few courses were shifted from one category on the green list to a different Area of Knowledge, a student may discover that a course already taken does not count in the category intended. Students in this situation may count the course toward Areas of Knowledge in the original category if the course was taken before autumn 1994. Green-list courses which were shifted from one category on the green list to another category in Areas of Knowledge are listed in the General Education Course Archives.

An adviser who feels a pre-1985 student acted in good faith but took the wrong course to meet a requirement should assist the student in submitting a petition to the College of Arts and Sciences Graduation Committee.

Students eligible for the green list, like all others using the Areas of Knowledge plan, must complete 75 credits, 20 in each Area plus 15 additional from any Areas. Since students on the green list were not allowed to count any courses in the major toward general education, the 15 additional credits should not be a problem for any student.

Other UW schools and colleges

In some UW schools and colleges, students who started college before 1994 (and students who transferred to the UW before 1996) are eligible for the pre-1994 general education requirements of that school or college. In many instances, however, the previous requirements of colleges meet or exceed the University 10-credit/category minimum of the current requirements, and there is no advantage to claiming eligibility for earlier requirements. Most schools and colleges expect students to meet their current general education requirements. A student requesting an exception should petition the college.

Pre-1985 basic skills requirements

Arts and Sciences students who started college anywhere before autumn 1985 are eligible to complete the old "proficiency" requirement in place of the current English composition, additional writing, quantitative/symbolic reasoning, and foreign language requirements. See Determining quarter of entry if the date when the student started college isn't clear.

The old proficiency requirement is a basic-skills requirement in English composition, mathematics, and foreign language. Students under this requirement must complete 15 credits of courses from the old proficiency list and/or the current English composition and quantitative/symbolic reasoning lists. The student may divide the proficiency credits any way - drawing courses from all three categories or between any two of them, or taking all 15 credits in one.

English

All courses on the current English composition list can be counted toward the old proficiency requirement. Students may also count CLAS 101 and courses in grammar. W courses may not be counted. Students who complete at least two courses in English composition may count COM 270, 285, 220, and 334 (formerly SP CMU 103, 203, 220, and 334; SP CMU 140, which was dropped from the curriculum, can also be counted). Students who entered the UW before autumn 1981 may count verse writing and short-story writing. Advisers may approve transfer courses if they are similar to courses on the old proficiency list.

Foreign language

All foreign language instruction courses, including conversation courses, and all courses taught in a foreign language (including literature courses) count toward the old proficiency requirement.

Mathematics

All courses on the current quantitative and symbolic reasoning list may count toward the old proficiency requirement. In addition, any other course with a MATH or STAT prefix may count toward the old proficiency requirement. Students may also count transferred liberal-arts math and trigonometry courses, even those which transfer as UW 1XX, 2XX, etc.

Grades required

There is no minimum grade required for proficiency courses under the old requirement. Courses taken since autumn 1985 to fulfill any requirement, however, including old proficiency, cannot be taken S/NS.

Transferred courses taken under a student-option pass-fail system may be counted only if they were taken before the student entered the UW. Transferred courses which were available only on a pass-fail basis, including courses transferred from colleges that do not assign traditional grades, can be counted toward proficiency regardless of when the student took the course.

Exemptions based on high school background

Students whose high school program included 4 units (years) of English, 3 units of college-preparatory mathematics, and 3 units of a single foreign language are exempt from the old proficiency requirement. College courses taken while in high school and later allowed as credit toward a college degree do not count toward the 4-3-3 formula required for exemption.

Note that this is an all-or-none proposition; students who do not present or exceed the complete 4-3-3 package must satisfy the entire proficiency requirement with college coursework.

4 units of English: In determining units, courses to be counted include all English from the ninth grade on, as well as speech, debate, drama, journalism, business English, creative writing courses, and others, if they emphasize the acquisition of English verbal and writing skills. These courses are usually called "language arts" by high schools.

3 units of college-preparatory mathematics: Courses counted toward the 3-unit requirement include, but are not limited to, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, math analysis, advanced math, calculus, and statistics. Courses not counted include non-college-preparatory math courses, such as business math, computer programming, senior arithmetic, accounting, and general math.

3 units of a single foreign language: Three units of foreign language should be interpreted as successful completion of a third-year course in high school. Languages taken before the 9th grade ordinarily count as half a unit per year. Thus, Spanish taken in the 7th, 8th, and 9th grades usually counts as 2 units, while Spanish taken in the 9th, 10th, and 11th grades counts as 3 units. It is the level completed that is important. For example, a student who takes Spanish in 7th and 8th grades and then takes the first two years of Spanish in high school is considered to have completed only two units of language. Conversely, students who were allowed to skip one or more semesters of language are evaluated according to the level of study completed.

Native language: If a language other than English was the language of instruction during any of a student's junior-high or high-school years (seventh grade or beyond), the student meets the foreign-language portion of the criteria for exemption, whether s/he is officially a native speaker of that language or not, because s/he studied the language at a level beyond that of most third-year high-school language courses in the United States. For the University's official definition of native speakers for purposes of admission, see Foreign Language: Native speakers.

Exemptions for transfer students

Students who transferred to the College of Arts and Sciences with 85 or more credits completed are exempt from the old proficiency requirement. This includes students who transferred to Arts and Sciences from another college of the University, if they had never been in Arts and Sciences before. Students who left Arts and Sciences, completed 85 or more credits at another college, and then returned are also exempt.

Students who earned an academic-transfer associate degree from a Washington community college before transferring to the UW are exempt from the old proficiency requirement, even if fewer than 85 transfer credits are accepted.

A student who has completed the general education requirements of another institution before transferring to the UW is exempt from the old proficiency requirement.

Postbaccalaureate students

Students who have already earned a bachelor's degree at the UW or elsewhere are exempt from the old proficiency requirement.

Requirements of other UW schools and colleges

Before University-level English composition and Q/SR requirements were instituted in 1985, basic-skills requirements were determined by each school or college. Most schools and colleges, except Arts and Sciences, expect all students to meet their current requirements. A student requesting an exception should petition the college.

Overlaps

Courses taken to remove high school deficiencies (except non-credit courses) may count toward the old proficiency requirement.

Credits that qualify for both may be counted toward the old proficiency requirement and the Areas of Knowledge requirement simultaneously. That is, with regard to overlap, the old proficiency requirement is treated like the current Q/SR and additional-writing requirements rather than the English composition and foreign language requirements. This is true even though overlaps were not allowed when the old proficiency requirement was in effect.

Courses counted toward the old proficiency requirement may also count toward a student's major.

Earlier general education plans

General education plans in effect before the plan described above are detailed in Previous General Education Requirements. In almost all cases, students who entered the UW when these plans were in effect are better off doing the combination described above: the current Areas of Knowledge requirement plus the pre-1985 proficiency requirement. A student who wishes to use an earlier general education plan (one that was in effect when s/he entered the UW) may do so, but must complete that general education plan in its entirety.