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Suggested Courses

These are primarily 100- and 200-level courses that have few or no prerequisites. Many of them fulfill General Education requirements. Included are new and unique offerings, courses that provide a good introduction to a major or field of study, and courses that are great for challenging your ideas about the Areas of Knowledge.

Quarter: Autumn, Winter

POL S 203: Introduction to International Relations

with Andrew Cockrell
What drives international relations and allows us to explain the modern world? International relations looks at the ideas behind interactions of nations, transnational organizations, and other political powers. It gives us tools to discuss some of the most contentious and difficult issues that affect the entire world: war, environmental policy, human rights, genocide, and world trade. These topics will be examined by learning the three major theories in international relations: realism, liberalism, and Marxism. No prerequisites.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Mark Weitzenkamp
August 13, 2014
Quarter: Winter

ENVIR 485: Environmental Planning and Permitting in Practice

with Todd Wildermuth
Advanced survey of the applied environmental regulation for project managers or students (juniors and seniors) from any major with an interest in environmental law, policy, and planning.This course includes: a case-study focus to explore the planning and permitting requirements of major state and federal environmental regulations; special emphasis on environmental impact statements (NEPA and SEPA), the Growth Management Act, development projects in and around water, and endangered species regulation; frequent connections to controversies in the regional and national spotlight such as coal and oil transport, endangered salmon, and climate change adaptation.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Joe Kobayashi
November 13, 2014
Quarter: Winter

ENGL 285: Writers on Writing

In this class the collective UW Creative Writing faculty, along with other visiting artists, will remember in public why they do what they do. On ten sequential Tuesdays, they will speak in depth about what interests them most, including the ways and means of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and the joys and vagaries of inspiration, education, artistic practice, and the writing life. Thursdays will constellate a literary reading series. Discussion sections will be scheduled in between. This course is intended to bring infectious literate passion within earshot of as many people as possible at the University of Washington. No formal prerequisites. Everyone is invited.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kimberly Swayze
November 13, 2014
Quarter: Winter

ESS 106: Living with Volcanos

with Michael Harrell
This course is relevant to anyone who lives near a volcano, or has an interest in volcanology, or the social ramifications of life near a volcano! This course explores volcanoes and volcanic eruptions on Earth and in the solar system, examines how volcanoes work and how they affect the environment, life, and human societies. Illustrates principles using local examples of recent volcanism and ancient examples of mega-eruptions. Additionally, the course will discuss and evaluates the possibility of predicting future eruptions.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Noell Bernard-Kingsley
November 14, 2014
Quarter: Winter

ENVIR 100: Environmental Studies: Interdisciplinary Foundations

with Yen-Chu Weng, Jorge Tomasevic
Learn about contemporary environmental challenges and responses, including topics on climate change, biodiversity conservation, sustainability, and natural resource management. Recognize the complexity in environmental issues and our connections to these issues at multiple scales, from local to global. Participate in a dynamic and unique learning experience with an interdisciplinary teaching team. Practice environmental communication and critical thinking skills through peer engagement, iterative writing assignments, a team project, and a public poster presentation.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Joe Kobayashi
November 13, 2014
Quarter: Winter

SOC 201B: Scientists Are People Too! The Role and Practice of Science in Modern Society

with Kelly Kistner
When sociologists look at the social phenomena they consider aspects of organization, coordination, and institutions; authority, trust, and power; material tools, places, and technologies; conflict, change, communication, and cooperation. This course will introduce students to a sociological way of thinking about science as a social phenomenon. We will consider science in its different forms and in comparison to other ways of knowing. We will consider the historical development of modern science and the social structures that support its practice and place in society today. We will consider how the broader social world is imprinted in scientific practices, and how science permeates modern life. By more fully examining these social dimensions of science, students will gain an appreciation of science as a collaborative and adaptable source of social order, while recognizing the potential challenges of scientific work and within modern techno-scientific societies.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Autumn Yoke
November 18, 2014
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring

ESS 102: Space and Space Travel

with Erika Harnett
Take your education to the limits, of the solar system that is! ESS 102 is a great introduction to the upper limits of the Earth's atmosphere and what lies beyond. Compare the differences between Earth and the other planets in our solar system, as well as how to travel to them. Get to know the complex features of the sun, such as, how it gives us a source of energy and life, but also the deadly affects of solar radiation. This optional writing class can also count as I&S or NW credits. Plus, you get to build your very own water rocket!
Credits: 5
Recommended by Dana Hansen
August 4, 2014
Quarter: Autumn, Winter

Introduction to Community, Environment, and Planning (CEP 200)

with Marty Curry and Christopher Campbell
A CEP education is fully lived, not passively taken. In CEP 200, students learn how to communicate, facilitate, plan, and lead groups while exploring concepts of community, environment, and planning as defining ideas that shape our world and animate our actions. This class is perfect for freshman and sophomores looking for an active, small, community-focused, and engaging 5 credit course.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kelly Hostetler
June 3, 2015
Quarter: Winter

POL S 270 Introduction to Political Economy

with Anthony Gill
This class has two purposes. First, it designed to introduce students to the analytical side of political economy (i.e., the use of economic assumptions and analysis to understand political and social choices). Second, the class will tackle a fundamental question underlying all political economy inquiries: How do humans allocate resources in society?
Credits: 5
Recommended by Mark Weitzenkamp
January 2, 2015
Quarter: Autumn, Winter

POL S 204: Introduction to Comparative Politics

with Prof. James Long
Comparative politics is what people usually mean when they say they are interested in international politics. This class studies the development and growth of states. It looks at how different societies approach issues like economic growth, regime change, conflict, ethnic difference and electoral policy. This class will give its students a more complex and nuanced understanding of the constantly changing politics of the world. No prerequisites.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Mark Weitzenkamp
August 13, 2014
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring

URBDP 498: Planning as a Profession

with David Blum and Reema Shakra
Want to learn about urban planning, real estate, or community development? Want to network with professionals? Take this one credit class and hear from a professional each week! Past speakers have included: Dennis McLerran, Regional Administrator, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10; Marshall Foster, Deputy Director, City of Seattle Department of Planning and Development; Ellen Miller-Wolfe, Director of Economic Development, City of Kirkland; Mandi Roberts, Principal, OTAK, Inc., Kirkland; Jeremy Eknoian, Manager, Internal Operations – Real Estate Office, University of Washington.
Credits: 1
Recommended by Kelly Hostetler
November 13, 2014
Quarter: Winter

AIS 475 A: Environmental Issues on Indigenous Homelands

with Clarita Lefthand-Begay
This class will consist of an interdisciplinary analysis of the environmental problems plaguing Indigenous communities in North America. The overarching goals of this course will include an examination of the policies relevant to protecting communities from environmental pollutants occurring on the homelands of Indigenous peoples, the health implications of exposure to contaminated ecosystems, and case studies that illustrate strategies for how indigenous communities are working to address these issues. It will also aim to build critical awareness about environmental problems and explore the intersection between pollutants, human health, ecosystem services and community action. Students will be encouraged to work together to communicate environmental problems discussed in class.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Elissa Washuta
December 2, 2014
Quarter: Winter

ENVIR 239: Sustainability: Personal Choices, Broad Impacts

with Kristi Straus and Megan Horst
What does sustainability mean? How do you make sustainability choices in your everyday life? How do you effect change? Engage in personal sustainability experiments and explore key pillars of sustainability, the history of sustainability movements, and sustainability in action. Course open to students of all majors and years.This new course is offered as a 3 credit, lecture only version or a 5 credit version where you attend the lecture and do about 50 hours of service learning with organizations working on sustainability. Heard a lot about sustainability? Want to get involved, but don't know where to start? Start here!
Credits: 5
Recommended by Joe Kobayashi
November 13, 2014
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring

NUTR 200: Nutrition for Today

If you have an interest in nutrition, this is a great course to start with. It's a core course for the Nutritional Sciences Minor and is the prerequisite for almost all other NUTR courses. You'll learn about the role of nutrition in health, wellness, and prevention of chronic disease. Topics include nutrients and nutritional needs across the lifespan, food safety, body weight regulation, eating disorders, and sports nutrition. Note that this course was formerly NUTR 300, so it cannot be taken for credit if credit was earned in NUTR 300.
Credits: 4
Recommended by Kristin Elko
May 21, 2015
Quarter: Winter

SOC 201C: Contemporary Chinese Societies

with Lake Lui
From a sociological perspective, this course will begin with an introduction on the main institutions of traditional Chinese society and investigate how these institutions have changed under the rule of the Chinese Communist Party. The course will also focus on the post-1978 reform period and discuss the social changes in various aspects of contemporary Chinese societies, including the economy, family, social stratification, internal and international migration, politics, and the civil society. Wherever relevant, examples will be drawn from other Chinese societies in Taiwan and Hong Kong.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Autumn Yoke
November 18, 2014
Quarter: Winter

EDUC 300: Creativity and Design in Education

with Iain M Robertson, a design faculty from Landscape Architecture, and Professor Leslie Rupert Herrenkohl in Learning Sciences and Human Development.
EDUC 300 explores education pedagogy through a series of interactive creativity exercises derived from design studio methods and practices. Exercises encourage and challenge participants to see their education from diverse perspectives. The process of exploration & discovery will be followed by discussion & synthesis, with subsequent reflection & integration recorded and memorialized in participants' journals. Exercise experiences will be linked to pedagogical theories and will consider how these tangible, spatial, social, and experiential 'creativity exercises' may be adapted for application in K-12 settings. Participants will be required to surprise themselves weekly. Own up! Only you can own your own education! OPEN TO ALL UNDERGRADUATES
Credits: 5
Recommended by Lisa Murakami
November 14, 2014
Quarter: Winter

General Studies 297H (Career Planning)

with Tina Wang
This course (taught by a Lead Career Counselor) assists freshmen and sophomore students (first and second year students) with self-exploration and exploration of career and academic options. General Studies 297H (“Career Planning”), is a 2-credit course (CR/NC) where students attend two 50-minute classes each week. This course is designed for first and second-year students who have earned roughly 0-89 credits. No pre-requisites are required. Learning objectives are to build self-awareness and appreciation for your strengths, skills, values, and interests and learn how to use this self-knowledge to make decisions when exploring and pursuing academic and career options; develop and apply learned skills to effectively research career options and learn how to be successful in the job market and hone your professional networking skills (including online, social media, and traditional networking); learn how to create effective resumes, cover letters and build interviewing skills and confidence.
Credits: 2
Recommended by Patrick Chidsey
November 13, 2014
Quarter: Winter

BE 210 : A Global History of Built Environment I

with Dr. Vikramāditya Prakāsh
How can we understand the built environment - our cities, landscapes, buildings, ancient caves? Using a global perspective, this course critically examines built environments over time beginning with First Societies through the 1st millennium CE. The global perspective encourages thinking about history in a transnational and transgeographical manner. The course is broadly structured around the concept of “time cuts,” that allow for comparison and connections across regions and cultural formations. No prerequisites.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Deepthi Bathala
January 18, 2018
Quarter: Winter

ENVIR 439: Attaining a Sustainable Society

with Elizabeth Wheat
Is a sustainable society possible? Building a sustainable future depends on restructuring the global economy and dramatic changes in values and lifestyles. Is sustainability a reasonable goal? What is the timeline? Grapple with these and other questions in this 3 credit course. Identify major impediments to achieving a sustainable society.Choose from among one of four hopeful movements and explore how that movement is helping our society move toward a more sustainable future. o Food o Energy o Economics o Governance Open to all majors.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Joe Kobayashi
November 13, 2014
Quarter: Winter

ESS 119: Lab Tours in Earth and Space Sciences

with Victor Aque
Are you interested in the scientific research that occurs at the UW? Take a look specifically at the cutting-edge research that is happening in the Department of Earth and Space Sciences including the Rocket Lab, Isotope Lab, and many others! Each week the course leader will take you to a lab within the department where the researchers in those labs will teach you about their research!
Credits: 1
Recommended by Noell Bernard-Kingsley
November 14, 2014
Quarter: Winter

CEP 200: Introduction to Community, Environment, and Planning

with Christopher Campbell and Marty Curry
This is a fantastic course for freshmen and sophomores interested in the natural environment, community development, and urban planning. This class looks at the intersection of all three of these fields and how they influence human experience in the built environment. This is a collaborative, interdisciplinary course that forces students to learn professional facilitation and leadership skills, all while introducing them to the CEP major in the College of Built Environments.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kelly Hostetler
November 12, 2014
Quarter: Winter

ESS 100: Dinosaurs

The name of this course says it all! Explore the exciting world of dinosaurs with Ruth Martin, Ph.D, who is a Research Associate at the Burke Museum! This course will cover the biology, behavior, ecology, evolution, and extinction of dinosaurs, and a history of their exploration. With dinosaurs as focal point, course also introduces the student to how hypotheses in geological and paleobiological science are formulated and tested.
Credits: 2
Recommended by Noell Bernard-Kingsley
November 14, 2014
Quarter: Winter

FISH 101: Water and Society

with Julian Olden and Daniel Schindler
Interested in how human population, climate change and more affect fresh water ecosystems and supplies? Then you should take FISH 101! FRESHWATER is: • Essential for life. • The oil of the 21st century. • Breeding ground of the most dangerous human diseases. • Losing species faster than any other ecosystem. • A reason to launch a war? Come learn about how, despite the abundance of water on Earth, freshwater is coming under increasing pressure as human populations increase and climate warms. Come learn about how social changes might reduce human impacts on fresh water systems, locally, nationally and internationally.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Samantha Scherer
November 17, 2015
Quarter: Winter

Geog 295: Living in the Borderlands: Gender, Race and Place

with Megan Ybarra
We tend to think of borders as fixed lines that divide Us from our Others. In recent years, geographers, political scientists, poets and activists have debated the meaning of borders, focusing on borderlands as a concept that transcends physical borders between nation-states. This class will direct scholarly inquiry towards a broad array of sources to think through living in the borderlands. We will pull out key themes from a classic feminist Chicanx text, Borderlands / La Frontera, to direct our analysis towards a relational understanding of place and identity. While the class will start with the case of the making of the US-Mexico border, we will also draw from other cases around the world in articles, movies, and podcasts. Themes include: settler colonialism and ethnic identities, bilingualism and belonging, transnationalism and diaspora, and how people make claims on gendered, raced and place identities.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Rick Roth
November 13, 2014
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring

ENVIR 100

with Kristi Straus, Yen-Chu Weng
Environmental Studies offers interdisciplinary learning, integrating the broad range of social and natural science disciplines. This course examines contemporary environmental challenges and responses, including climate change, ocean acidification, biodiversity, social justice, and more. Students learn about the complexities involved in environmental issues and about our connections to these issues on multiple scales, from local to global. This course provides students with a dynamic and unique learning experience with an interdisciplinary teaching team.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Ann Corboy
February 6, 2015
Quarter: Autumn, Winter

ENV H 111 Exploring Environment and Health Connections

with Dr. Thomas Burbacher
This course is open to all majors and has no prerequisites. It fulfills one of the admission prerequisites for the PUBLIC HEALTH major. It is also counts toward the ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH MAJOR AND MINOR. Explore the science behind the headlines! Topics covered include: • Mercury in seafood • DDT & Malaria • Flame Retardants • Air Pollution • Chemicals in the Workplace • Salmonella & Ebola • Physical & Psychosocial Risks • Zoonotic Disease
Credits: 3
Recommended by Trina Sterry
November 17, 2015
Quarter: Autumn, Winter

LING 269: Swearing and Taboo Language

with Laura McGarrity
This course gives a great linguistic perspective on taboo language by breaking it down in terms of pragmatic, neurological, psychological, sociocultural, and legal aspects. No previous experience with linguistics is required! If you're having registration issues, please contact lingadv@uw.edu
Credits: 5
Recommended by Katie Manlove
July 7, 2015
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer

ESS 101: Intro to Geological Sciences

Geology is all around us! From the volcanic Mt. Rainier, to glacial deposits from millions of years ago, there is a ton of geology in our back yard. Intro to Geology is a great survey course that emphasizes the dynamic datuer of the interior and exterior of our planet, and understanding of how our planet is chaning. This is a lab based couse, with field trips almost every weekend. All majors welcome!
Credits: 5
Recommended by Dana Hansen
February 12, 2015
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring

ATM S 111: Global Warming: Understanding the Issues

Includes a broad overview of the science of global warming. Discusses the causes, evidence, future projections, societal and environmental impacts, and potential solutions. Introduces the debate on global warming with a focus on scientific issues.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Melissa P. Pritchard
June 2, 2015
Quarter: Winter

ASIAN 206: Literature and Culture of South Asia from Tradition to Modernity

with Jennifer Dubrow
Utilize your time at UW and learn something new and unexpected! This is a great introduction for any student looking to learn the history and culture of South Asia through the literature. This course is an introduction to medieval and modern South Asian literature in its cultural context. The texts are an English translation.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Angie Cross
November 17, 2015
Quarter: Winter

INTSCI 403/HONORS 392A: Science in Context

with Brian Buchwitz
This course will focus on case study examinations of how science operates within broad social, political, and ethical contexts. We will consider the growth of multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research, the societal impact of scientific results and developed technologies, the political environment surrounding scientific practice, the ethical responsibilities of scientists, the censorship of scientific findings, the complex mechanisms for funding scientific research, and the power inherent in claims to knowledge. The case studies will emphasize intersections among science communication, science education, science policy, and science research. Potential topics include the regulation of genetically-­modified organisms, the study of global climate change, and the teaching of evolution. Examining these cases will ask us to analyze articles from a variety of scientific and popular sources and to engage, both independently and collaboratively, in assignments, discussions, and presentations.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Meghan Oxley
November 17, 2015
Quarter: Winter

INTSCI 301: Integrated Sciences Careers Seminar

with Brian Buchwitz
Are you interested in a career in the sciences? Would you like to explore a wide variety of careers available to students with a broad science background? Network with professionals in science careers, including science education, science writing, and science policy? Learn about successful pathways to careers in science, as wells as the skills required for those careers? Weekly guest speakers in INTSCI 301 expose students to a variety of possible careers and provide students with tips and insight based on their own careers in the sciences. Students complete a final "field experience" consisting of a visit and informational interview with someone working in the sciences. Open to undergraduates at all levels with an interest in learning more about science careers.
Credits: 1
Recommended by Meghan Oxley
November 5, 2014
Quarter: Winter

JEW ST 250/ HSTCMP 250

with Prof. Halperin
This course introduces students to various expressions of Jewish culture including biblical, Hellenistic, Judeo-Arabic, Sephardic, Ashkenazic, Eastern European, American and Israeli. As students analyze Jewish culture across time and space, the class will discuss how Jews both adopted the cultural assumptions of their neighbors and adapted these traditions to preserve a distinct identity. Prof. Halperin is a new professor at UW. She is an historian and serves as Chair as the new Israel Studies program at UW.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Lauren Kurland
January 18, 2018
Quarter: Winter

PHG 302: Forensic Genetics

with Bruce Weir
Do you still have an inner Crime Scene Investigator even though you've stopped watching CSI? This new course introduces the field of forensic genetics. It does so through discussion of emerging genetic and statistical issues that have come about since the introduction of DNA profiling. A great way for students to develop the skills to: interpret the evidence of matching genetic profiles; perform calculations relevant for parentage determination; identify remains; and consider the implications of familial searching of DNA databases. Open to all undergraduate who have comp leted a basic statistics course - BIOST 310, STAT 220, STAT/CS&SS/SOC 221, STAT 311, Q SCI 381, or Q METH 201.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Tory Brundage
November 17, 2014
Quarter: Winter

JSIS C 155: Heroes, Heretics and Radicals: Beginnings of Judaism & Christianity

with Prof Mika Ahuvia
Prof Ahuvia gets rave reviews from students for her passion for her subject matter and her commitment to student learning. In this course, students explore the men and women who revolutionized the religious landscape in antiquity--some of whom are remembered as heroes, some as heretics, and some who have been almost entirely forgotten.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Lauren Kurland
November 19, 2015
Quarter: Winter

HSERV 481: Issues in Public Health

with Sara Mackenzie
This course focuses on practical solutions for real life public health problems. For years it has been our most popular public health course, taught by our enthusiastic program director. This is the last time it will be offered at the UW and is the first-time in quite a few years that it has been open to non-majors. It IS a perfect opportunity for upper division students with an interest in the public health discipline and/or graduate programs. It is NOT appropriate for students intending to apply to the public health major as the content has moved to another required course.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Susan Inman
November 14, 2014
Quarter: Winter

ENVIR 495D: Environmental Education Field Practicum

with Tim Billo
This new course is an amazing opportunity to design and deliver an environmental education curriculum for one of Washington's most diverse middle schools in Seattle's international district. It is an opportunity to gain teaching skills for environmental education in an outdoor setting, and will offer insight and avenues into excellent career opportunities in environmental education. Students will conduct classroom visits, discuss basic teaching techniques for environmental education in outdoor settings, talk about diversity issues in environmental education, work as a team to design and deliver a curriculum, meet with teachers at Washington Middle School to understand their needs and challenges, and observe middle school students in a classroom setting to get to know them better before taking them outdoors. During the last week of class, UW students will be taking Washington Middle School 8th graders out to a Seattle city park to deliver a comprehensive environmental education curriculum. Students must be willing to miss three days of class to teach the curriculum.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Monali Patel
November 17, 2015
Quarter: Winter

ARCH 351: Romanesque, Gothic and Renaissance Architecture

with Brian McLaren
This course traces the history of architecture during the 1,000-year period that begins with the emergence of Islamic Architecture (ca. 700) following the death of Muhammad and the foundation of a Holy Roman Empire under Charlemagne (ca. 800) and ends with the foundation of the United States of America (1776) and the creation of the first modern nation state of France (1789). These momentous events frame a number of significant stylistic and technical developments in architecture from the reinterpretation of classical sources during the early part of the Middle Ages to the various formations of Islamic architecture in Spain, North Africa and the Middle East, the emergence of Gothic architecture in the Île-de-France, as well as the later developments in Renaissance and Baroque architecture and parallels in the Ottoman Empire, China and Japan. The course covers a remarkable period of world history during which architecture was influenced by a series of profound cultural and religious transformations, such as the rise of Islam and the humanist cultural revolution of the Italian Renaissance. Arch 351 is the second of a three part series of courses in the history of architecture from the Ancient World to the present and is appropriate to undergraduate students at the sophomore level or above who are in any field of study.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Nancy Dragun
December 15, 2014
Quarter: Winter

CLAS 427: Greek and Roman Tragedy in English

with Professor Ruby Blondell
Want to learn more about the ancient world through its tragedies? This course focuses on Greek tragedies dealing with the Trojan War and its aftermath, from Aeschylus' *Oresteia,* to Sophocles' *Ajax* and *Philoctetes,* to several of Euripides' "Trojan War" plays. We will examine the varying attitudes towards warfare expressed through the dramas, and compare different treatments of characters that are important to the larger story (e.g. Agamemnon, Odysseus, Helen). Open to undergraduates at all levels.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Sarah Stroup
November 24, 2015
Quarter: Winter

Geog 258: Digital Geographies

with Sarah Elwood
From the use of Google’s MyMaps or geo-tagged Tweets to coordinate street protests for democracy, to ‘check-in’ apps that alert when us when a friend is nearby, to online or smart-phone citizen data collection apps, making and using digital maps and geographic information is an increasing part of everyday life in many parts of the world. This class explores the key components, applications and societal impacts of contemporary geographic data and technologies, including online mapping software, handheld geographic devices, the geoweb, location-based services, crowdsourced spatial data sets, and open source geographic technologies. You will develop hands-on experience using these forms of geographic information and technologies, and develop a framework for critically assessing the digital geographies emerging through these new data, technologies, and applications.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Rick Roth
November 13, 2014
Quarter: Winter

SOC 201D: The College Experience

with Annie McGlynn-Wright
Your life, as a college student, has been studied by sociologists who have researched everything from "hook ups" to studying. This course asks YOU to become the sociologist and explore college life using a sociological lens. In the course, you will become familiar with the ways that sociologists have explored and explained contemporary college life. You will learn and use qualitative methods and sociology theory to study your own lives. As a class, we will ask: what is the college experience?
Credits: 5
Recommended by Autumn Yoke
November 18, 2014
Quarter: Winter

ARCH 151: Appreciation of Architecture and the Built Environment II

with Ann Marie Borys, Associate Professor of Architecture
NOTE: ARCH 150 is not a pre-requisite. The two courses are related in their approach and use the same textbook, but they cover different time spans of global history. This lecture course seeks this understanding of ourselves and our world primarily through historical developments in architecture from about 1400 onward, right down to today. You will be introduced to the Shakespeares and the Beethovens of architecture—the great artistic geniuses of the past (and present) and their primary works that influence our world. But you will also see some of the social and technical complexities that contribute to the shaping of the built environment in addition to artistic insight. And finally, you will also be introduced to a way of looking at architecture that will enrich your encounters with everyday buildings, not only the most memorable ones: how they stand up, what visual cues and ordering systems make them comprehensible, how human sense-based perception is just as important to our encounter with it as the physical reality of the building.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Nancy Dragun
December 4, 2014
Quarter: Winter

ENVIR 495 F: Environmental Communication, Messaging and Outreach

with P. Sean McDonald
You walk the walk, but can you talk the talk? Effective environmental communication is critical for practitioners and engaged citizens alike. This course will explore the variety of media and methods for conveying environmental information in the digital age. Learn to develop clear and concise messaging; practice techniques for improving presentation content and delivery; discuss tools for reaching appropriate audiences.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Monali Patel
November 17, 2015
Quarter: Winter

SPH 480: Research Methods

with Janet Baseman & Lonnie Nelson
Do cell phones cause cancer? Is climate change real? Maybe you'll find out for yourself in SPH 480, the most fun you'll ever have in research methods! SPH 480 takes a case-based approach to focus on how research findings impact the world around us and our health. Students will learn how to understand the research process and how to interpret scientific findings, thus becoming a better consumer of public health information. No need to be a scientist--students should be curious and ready to explore! Please note, this is also the only time students outside of the Public Health Major will be able to take this course!
Credits: 5
Recommended by Ardith Feroglia
November 14, 2014
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer

LING 200: Introduction to Linguistics

This course investigates language as the fundamental characteristic of the human species. It covers topics on the diversity and complexity of human languages, phonological and grammatical analysis, dimensions of language use, language acquisition, and historical language change. This course is a great option for students interested in language and/or linguistics, as well as anyone who would like to learn more about how and why they speak.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Katie Manlove
November 18, 2014
Quarter: Winter

GERMAN 390A: Freud and the Literary Imagination

with Richard Gray
This English-language course offering explores Sigmund Freud's theories of the dream, the nature of literary creativity, the operation of the human psyche, and the substance of human culture. The course will focus on literature produced in the wake of Freud's theories and will be structured around themes such as: The Psyche as Writing Machine, Dreams as Texts, The Oedipus Complex, Eros and Thantos, the Union of Love and Death, Neurosis and Sexuality.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Stephanie Welch
November 23, 2015
Quarter: Winter

JSIS C 250/HSTCMP 250: Introduction to Jewish Cultural History

with Prof Devin Naar
Students in this course learn about the historic relationship between Jews and their neighbors--ranging from Greeks to Arabs to Eastern Europeans. Students analyze Jewish culture across time and space to discuss how Jews both adopted the cultural assumptions of their neighbors and adapted these traditions to preserve a distinct identity. Prof Naar is consistently lauded by students for his well-structured and engaging lectures.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Lauren Kurland
November 19, 2015
Quarter: Winter

SLAV 200: Introduction to Literature

with Crnkovic
This is a brand-new course by one of our most popular and engaging instructors. Literature—from simple oral styles such as jokes or riddles to modern day music lyrics, stories, or novels—has a history that is as long as that of the human race itself, and that has shaped human history in crucial ways. Intended both for those who have had little or no experience with literature as well as for the avid readers, this course provides an introduction to the ways in which great literature works and creates its magic. Students will read fiction and poetry from various times and places, a few selections from several of the world’s most famous novels, and one whole novel. From poetry set to music by the Beatles, Beethoven, or anonymous Slavic folk artists, to Hemingway, Kafka, Proust, Borowski, Kiš, Bulgakov, Steinbeck or Murakami, with an emphasis on literature written in English and that from the Slavic (East European) area, the readings of this course will give a small “taste” of the incredible wealth and pertinence of world literature.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Shosh Westen
December 4, 2014
Quarter: Winter

BE 220 A: Cities, Health, and Well-being

with Mugerauer, Sarasmita, Vongkulbhisal
BE 220 explores how cities contribute to health and well-being, including security, basic needs, positive social relations, freedom, choices and opportunities. It evaluates an urban future and debates strategies for rehabilitating existing cities and building new, sustainable ones.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Bob Mugerauer
January 18, 2018
Quarter: Winter

DANCE 250: Cross Cultural Dance

with Juliet McMains
Examines dance as a universal activity and expression of cultural identity. Offers a cross-cultural and historical view of a variety of theatrical, vernacular, and sacred dance forms, and investigates the myriad ways that dance functions across societies. This is a mix of lecture and studio components. No dance experience is necessary.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kelly Canaday
December 1, 2014
Quarter: Winter

EDUC 210: Education and the Playfield

with Sara Lopez
This course examines the intersection of education and sport from early childhood to college experiences. Explores educational themes related to physical development, sport's influence on individual and community development, access to physical activities, equity and inclusion within the sports environment, and the role of sports in social change. This course is open to all students during registration period 2 beginning November 24th.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Lisa Murakami
November 14, 2014
Quarter: Autumn, Winter

POL S 201: Introduction to Political Theory

with Prof. Christine Di Stefano
Do you want to be able to convincingly explain the deep ideas behind your political opinion? Theory is a way to get at the big ideas that shape politics. It creates the vocabulary and the critical/analytical skills that let us talk productively about topics like: justice, freedom, equality, conflict, revolution, international policy, and globalization. In this class you will read political theorists such as: Plato, Rousseau, Douglass, Goldman, Thoreau, and Malcolm X. No prerequisites.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Mark Weitzenkamp
August 13, 2014
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer

ESRM100 Environmental Science

with Robert Harrison
This course is appropriate for all students, freshmen through seniors. There are no prerequisites, just an interest in the environment. ESRM100 provides a comprehensive overview of environmental science. By using an "earth systems" approach, students recognize society and the environment as an interrelated system. Environmental issues are examined throughout the course and realistic solutions are investigated. The course can be take as an additional writing course for W credit. You get to write your papers on issues you consider critical to the environment.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Rob Harrison
June 2, 2015
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring

CLAS 210: Greek and Roman Classics in English: the Invention of Western Literature

with Team-taught by the entire faculty of the Classics Department, with twice weekly TA-led sections
Epic, history, philosophy, tragedy, comedy, lyric, satire: invented or reinvented by the Greeks and Romans, transmitted from the ancient Mediterranean to modern world literature. Whether you are completely new to this material, or looking to connect texts already read with texts not yet read, this course will deliver to you the foundations of western literature and thought. Homer and Virgil; Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides; Herodotus and Tacitus; Catullus, Ovid and Juvenal; Sappho, Plato and more—great authors who have been shaping great conversations for over 2000 years. Open to undergraduates at all levels, with no prerequisites.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Sarah Stroup
November 24, 2015
Quarter: Winter

GERMAN 390: Adapting Arthur: Retelling the Story of the Once and Future King

with Annegret Oehme
This course offers a survey of the important narrative traditions of the Arthurian legends, including medieval manuscripts, Monty Python, and a comic about a transgender knight. Students will explore medieval, modern, and contemporary material and in the process will learn to access pre-modern narratives. The Arthurian material serves as a case study to discuss the human need to retell stories in order to make sense of reality. We will explore this rich tradition by examining German, English, Hebrew, Yiddish, and French narratives in a variety of media. Course is taught in English.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Stephanie Welch
October 31, 2017
Quarter: Winter

ATM S 220A: Exploring the Atmospheric Sciences

This course consists of weekly lectures from faculty, graduate students and research scientists within the field of atmospheric sciences. It provides information on their research projects, background and career paths. Areas of focus within the lecture series typically include lectures based on research on global warming, hurricanes, air pollution, climate change and other specialized topics.
Credits: 1
Recommended by Melissa P. Pritchard
November 13, 2014
Quarter: Winter

INTSCI 492: Reflections on Undergraduate Research

with Brian Buchwitz
Are you participating in undergraduate research in the biological, environmental, or physical sciences? Would you like to: Demystify research culture and develop research skills? Discuss research papers with a diverse community of undergraduate researchers? Develop a research proposal and increase your competitiveness for research scholarships and graduate & professional programs? Present your research in oral and written formats & improve your science communication skills? INTSCI 492: Reflections on Undergraduate Research (2 credits, NW) is a discussion-based course that is designed to accompany undergraduate research experiences. Students engage in a reflective learning community with fellow undergraduate researchers to (1) learn about research culture, including mentoring relationships, (2) identify, analyze, and discuss research papers that are relevant to projects, (3) draft, comment on, and revise research proposals, and (4) present research in oral formats. INTSCI 492 will meet on Mondays, 3:30-4:50 p.m., during Winter Quarter. INTSCI 492 has no prerequisites, but students must participate in undergraduate research concurrently. For more information or to request an add code, please email the instructor at: bjb@uw.edu
Credits: 2
Recommended by Meghan Oxley
November 17, 2015
Quarter: Winter

GERMAN 298A: Cultures of Extinction

with Jason Groves
This is a new course offering by one of our newest faculty members. Credits count towards the Diversity requirement! This course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to understanding one of the more wicked problems of the 21st century: mass species extinction, or The Sixth Extinction, as it is often known. Rather than approaching this event as a discrete biological phenomenon, this course looks at how current threats to bio-diversity are implicated in, and connected to, threats to cultural diversity, in particular language loss. Students will seek to understand how discourses of extinction, beginning from its “discovery” in the 18th century, are related to fraught histories of colonialism and imperialism, whose ecological and cultural effects extend into the present and threaten to shape the future.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Stephanie Welch
November 17, 2015
Quarter: Winter

Indigenous Knowledge Visualization

with Instructor Miranda Belarde-Lewis
This course will examine a variety of Native Arts, Architecture, and other forms of expression that each explore the historical uses and the layering of Indigenous Knowledges. The knowledges embodied in the various forms have implications of expressing cultural health, political views and the realities of Native communities. The role played by economics and the tendency of stereotypical perpetuation and privileging some forms of Native expression over others will also be a topic of exploration.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Cynthia Anderson
December 17, 2014
Quarter: Winter

GWSS 290

with Chandan Reddy
This is a special topics offering about force and violence related to Fergusen and college campuses.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Sara Fleehart
November 14, 2014
Quarter: Winter

Dance 239A: Tango - Lead

with Juliet McMains
Want to learn Tango and earn VLPA credit at the same time? This section is for the LEAD ROLE. This means the traditional male role within partner dance. You will have NO opportunity to follow (the traditional female role). We are very encouraging if a student wishes to participate in a non-traditional gender role, however remember that there will be no opportunity to switch sections.
Credits: 2
Recommended by Kelly Canaday
December 1, 2014
Quarter: Winter

ESS 203: Glaciers and Global Change

with Edwin Waddington
This course is open to non-science majors who are interested in the changing climate of the Earth! This course explores how glaciers record climate change and human activities through bubbles of ancient air and trace impurities in the ice. Also reviews glaciers impact on societies through sea-level, coastlines, water supplies, and transportation routes.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Noell Bernard-Kingsley
November 14, 2014
Quarter: Autumn, Winter

ATM S 101: Weather

with Michael Warner
The earth's atmosphere, with emphasis on weather observations and forecasting. Daily weather map discussions. Highs, lows, fronts, clouds, storms, jet streams, air pollution, and other features of the atmosphere. Physical processes involved in weather phenomena.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Melissa P. Pritchard
June 2, 2015
Quarter: Winter

RELIG 201

with Prof. Ahuvia
This course introduces students to those world religions that originated in the Middle East. We begin with ancient Israel (the Hebrew Bible / Old Testament) and then delve into its relationship with Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The ancient origins and contemporary relevance of these monotheistic traditions is examined in historical and interdisciplinary perspective. Prof Ahuvia has a great reputation among students for her attention to student learning and her integration of art and music in her lectures.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Lauren Kurland
January 18, 2018
Quarter: Winter

GEN ST 344: How Can I Help? An Introduction to Service and Community

with Talya Gillman and Jackie Mena
Many UW students are interested in exploring service and volunteer opportunities in Seattle; however, it can be difficult to know where to get involved, how to find a good fit, and how to most effectively work in a community-based setting. How Can I Help? An Introduction to Service and Community is a three-credit service-learning course that will offer a basic foundation on community service for students in their first or second year at the UW. Through participating in a quarter-long service-learning commitment, visiting local non-profit organizations, and participating in in-class discussions, readings, and activities students will gain a deeper understanding of the wide array of ways they can most effectively partner with their local community and integrate a commitment to service into their academic and professional futures. This three-credit seminar course is offered on Wednesdays from 3:30-6:20PM. Request an add code by emailing engage@uw.edu.
Credits: 3
November 14, 2014
Quarter: Winter

BE 220: Cities, Health, and Well-being

with Robert Mugerauer
BE 220 explores how cities contribute to health and well-being, including security, basic needs, positive social relations, freedom, choices, and opportunities. It evaluates an urban future and debates strategies for rehabilitating existing cities and building new, sustainable ones. The course focuses on how the practices and knowledge of built environment professions and disciplines interact with public health, engineering, and the sciences to understand and change cities.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Adnya Sarasmita
October 31, 2017
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer

LING 100: Fundamentals of Grammar

with Clarissa Surek-Clark
This course introduces students to the basics of grammatical concepts and terminology, moving beyond the mundane world of prescriptive 'grammar rules.' Students will learn how to analyze grammatical structures in English, delving briefly into other languages. The curriculum is designed for students taking (or preparing to take) foreign languages as it provides a new perspective of language structure; students interested in linguistics are also encouraged to take the course.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Katie Langr
August 7, 2014
Quarter: Winter

ESS 315: Environmental Earth Science

with Terry Swanson
This course is open to anyone who has taken ESS 101! Don't be put off by the high number! Take another class with Terry Swanson and continue your base knowledge of Geological Sciences while exploring applications to Environmental Science! Analysis of geologic constraints upon human activity and the environmental consequences of such activity. Topics include hillslope processes, fluvial and groundwater processes, earthquake and volcanic hazards, and environmental aspects of deforestation and atmospheric pollution.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Noell Bernard-Kingsley
November 14, 2014
Quarter: Winter

GEN ST 348: Are Do-Gooders Doing Good? Critical Perspectives on Civic Engagement

with Kathryn Pursch Cornforth and David Hlebain
Are you committed to giving back? Trying to make a difference? Want to get more out of your volunteer experience? During Winter Quarter, we invite you to join in a critical reflection on what it means to “do good”. General Studies 348 will offer a hands-on opportunity to explore the concept of civic engagement. Students will critically reflect on their own service experiences through the lens of academic theories, engage with principles of community work, and learn from the experiences of community leaders. The course will draw heavily on students' involvement in service and will weave these together with elements of other academic coursework and future academic/career goals. The course has a required service-learning component; students are encouraged to utilize current service commitments toward this requirement, though individualized support will be offered to those looking for a service opportunity. This is a three-credit course that is offered as credit/no credit. Sessions will be held on Tuesdays from 3:30-5:20PM in Mary Gates Hall. Those interested in the course should email engage@uw.edu with questions and/or to request an add code.
Credits: 3
November 14, 2014
Quarter: Winter

ASIAN 207 B: Special Topics in Literature and Culture of Asia - JAPANESE ANIME

with Justin Jesty
Come explore and learn something new and exciting this winter quarter! This course is an introduction to Japanese Anime in an English translation. Learn about the literature and culture of Japan in this modern and vibrant context.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Angie Cross
November 17, 2015
Quarter: Winter

ATM S 101A: Weather

with Darren Wilton
The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of the physical processes responsible for weather and related atmospheric phenomena. The emphasis will be on how and why processes occur in the atmosphere, while fostering familiarity with the commonly used terminology.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Melissa P. Pritchard
November 13, 2014
Quarter: Winter

ENVIR 495 E: Grant Proposal Practicum

with Frederica Helmiere
Apply your environmental literacy to real-world problems by developing and presenting a project proposal targeting sustainability goals, using the UW Campus Sustainability Fund as a model. Develop skills in grant-writing, project development, and project management for projects targeting sustainability goals. Open to students from any major (no freshmen).
Credits: 3
Recommended by Joe Kobayashi
November 13, 2014

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