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Suggested Courses

These are primarily 100- and 200-level courses that have few or no prerequisites. Many of them fulfill General Education requirements. Included are new and unique offerings, courses that provide a good introduction to a major or field of study, and courses that are great for challenging your ideas about the Areas of Knowledge.

Quarter: Autumn

GEN ST 197: Unlocking Disease Diagnosis: The Hidden Career

with Kara Hansen-Suchy, other Lab Medicine faculty & guest speakers
This interactive course introduces the undergraduate major and career of Medical Laboratory Science (formerly Medical Technology). There are no prerequisites and this course is for anyone who loves science, has an interest in medicine and has a desire to learn about another career option in healthcare. The adviser for the MLS major consistently hears from students that they REALLY wish they would have learned about this major sooner. So don't miss your opportunity to learn about the profession that provides doctors with roughly 70% of the information they need to diagnose their patients. Clinical lab results are a critical part of the healthcare world and Medical Laboratory Scientists are the professionals responsible for producing accurate lab results. Join us for a behind-the-scenes exploration of medicine and be ready to be introduced to a whole new world that you probably never knew existed!
Credits: 1
Recommended by Heather Eggleston
August 4, 2014
Quarter: Autumn, Winter

POL S 204: Introduction to Comparative Politics

with Prof. James Long
Comparative politics is what people usually mean when they say they are interested in international politics. This class studies the development and growth of states. It looks at how different societies approach issues like economic growth, regime change, conflict, ethnic difference and electoral policy. This class will give its students a more complex and nuanced understanding of the constantly changing politics of the world. No prerequisites.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Mark Weitzenkamp
August 13, 2014
Quarter: Autumn, Winter

POL S 201: Introduction to Political Theory

with Prof. Christine Di Stefano
Do you want to be able to convincingly explain the deep ideas behind your political opinion? Theory is a way to get at the big ideas that shape politics. It creates the vocabulary and the critical/analytical skills that let us talk productively about topics like: justice, freedom, equality, conflict, revolution, international policy, and globalization. In this class you will read political theorists such as: Plato, Rousseau, Douglass, Goldman, Thoreau, and Malcolm X. No prerequisites.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Mark Weitzenkamp
August 13, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

INTSCI 402: Nature of Science

Are you interested in examining the nature of science? Would you like to: Understand how scientific knowledge is created, including the importance of integrated sciences perspectives and data analysis & presentation skills? Engage collaboratively in reflection and discussion with peers, helping one another to connect ideas across the sciences? In INTSCI 402, we will focus on case study examinations of scientific methods and elements of scientific practice. For example, how do scientists construct models to represent and test our understanding of the natural world? How do scientists use data to support, falsify, or modify theories? INTSCI 402 will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10:30 a.m.-12:20 p.m. If you have any questions, please feel free to email: intsci@uw.edu
Credits: 5
Recommended by Meghan Oxley
May 21, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

PHIL 160: Why Do We Believe in Quarks, Evolution, and Other Crazy Things? Perspectives on Science, Reason, and Reality

The course examines why we believe what science tells us. How does a theory go from being met with denial, to skepticism, to tentative acceptance, and finally to accepted "fact." Highly recommend the course to anyone, and especially to those future scientists. Optional W course.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Jim Scott
July 1, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

SPAN 121: Introductory Spanish Language Class

with Donally Kennedy
Take SPAN 121 in fall, SPAN 122 in winter, have fun, do the work and by spring in SPAN 123, you will be able to converse in Spanish on any subject of your choosing. In this class you will learn Spanish by watching "Destinos", a soap opera (una telenovela). From the first day, SPAN 121 is conducted almost entirely in Spanish as a conversation in which students discuss the characters and events as they unfold in the telenovela as the context through which they learn and practice the grammar and vocabulary. Gradually the scope of the conversation enlarges, so that by the third quarter, students will be able to discuss topics of their choosing in Spanish for the full class period. After three quarters of the Destinos series, many students have been able to jump ahead a level or two on second-year placement test. That is because SPAN 121, 122 and 123 is more intensive and grammar-focused than other first-year Spanish language series and is a great way for beginners to become proficient in Spanish fast. The course is intended for highly motivated beginning students who have a particular interest in learning Spanish beyond merely fulfilling the language requirement and who plan to commit a great deal of time to its study. Many students who have taken this course because they are highly motivated to learn Spanish have reported that they are amazed how well they can understand, speak, read and write Spanish by the time the course is over.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Donally Kennedy
August 4, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

HSERV 490/590: War and Health

with Evan Kanter and Amy Hagopian
We explore the health consequences of war during the first half of the course (injury, infectious diseases, mental health, chronic disease, malnutrition, infrastructure) and the role of health professionals and others in preventing war during the second half (advocacy, measurement and application of epidemiological methods, promotion of social equity).
Credits: 4
Recommended by Susan Inman
July 14, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

INTSCI 200: Controversies in Science & Society

with Brian Buchwitz
Are you interested in exploring controversies in science & society? Would you like to: Apply evidence-based reasoning to address questions, to evaluate sources and arguments, and to inform your own perspectives on science and society? Understand how scientific knowledge is created, including the importance of integrated sciences perspectives and data analysis & presentation skills? Engage collaboratively in reflection and discussion with peers, helping one another to connect ideas across the sciences? In INTSCI 200, we will focus on societal controversies that emphasize intersections among science communication, education, policy, and research. For example, why do parents choose to vaccinate, or not vaccinate, their children? How should genetically-modified organisms be regulated? INTSCI 200 will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:30-1:50 p.m. If you have any questions, please feel free to email the instructor at: bjb@uw.edu
Credits: 3
Recommended by Meghan Oxley
May 21, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

NUTR 141: Introduction to Foods

with Anne-Marie Gloster
While food is an integral component of social and cultural identity, its primary purpose is to nourish. In this introductory course, you’ll learn how foods have been used by different people and cultures to deliver adequate nutrients and energy. You’ll also explore the evolution of the global food supply, food preparation techniques, food patterns, and eating habits as they relate to diets, nutrition, and personal and public health. This course is an elective for the Nutritional Sciences Minor.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kristin Elko
June 28, 2016
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer

LING 200: Introduction to Linguistics

This course investigates language as the fundamental characteristic of the human species. It covers topics on the diversity and complexity of human languages, phonological and grammatical analysis, dimensions of language use, language acquisition, and historical language change. This course is a great option for students interested in language and/or linguistics, as well as anyone who would like to learn more about how and why they speak.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Katie Manlove
November 18, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

FISH/OCEAN/BIOL 250: Marine Biology

with Thomas Pool
This course introduces a diverse array of marine biology topics from ocean circulation to intertidal organisms to sustainable fisheries. It is appropriate for first quarter freshman and students with minimal science background as well as those with more advanced science knowledge. Marine Biology can be taken for 3 or 5 credits. The 5-credit version includes lectures plus labs and a field trip, and is a core course for the Marine Biology minor, which is the only minor on campus that can be declared before you declare a major! (Photo by Aaron Dufault)
Credits: 5
Recommended by Christen Foehring
July 31, 2014
Quarter: Autumn, Spring

ESS 106: Living with Volcanoes

with Mike Harrell
Even if you don't realize it, you are seeing a volcano almost every day. Mt. Rainier towers over Western Washington, but just what sort of eruption style will it have? How did it form? When will it erupt again and what does that mean for our city? These are just some of the questions addressed in Living with Volcanoes. This class covers everything from prehistoric eruptions to features on the outer limits of our solar system. This class is open to all majors, and at just 3 credits is a perfect addition to any schedule.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Dana Hansen
August 4, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

COM 220: Introduction to Public Speaking

with Matt McGarrity
Other than writing, I can think of no more universally useful skill than the ability to speak clearly and well. Even if you never intend to speak to thousands of people, as politicians or CEO's may do, do you think you may someday have to clearly and effectively explain your thinking on a complicated topic to co-workers, patients, or clients? This course will help you to do that. And if you're afraid of public speaking, all the more reason to tackle that fear now! Get outside your comfort zone!
Credits: 5
Recommended by Megan McConnell
August 7, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

HSERV 100: Personal and Public Health

Introduces the main components to a healthy lifestyle. Examines the role an individual needs to play in managing their wellness, and the role of society in creating a healthy environment.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Jim Scott
July 1, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

CLAS 324: Greek and Roman Athletics

with Dr. Sarah Stroup
Compelling overview of the role played by athletic festivals and events in Ancient Greek and Roman culture. Traces the rise of different events and competitions from the practices of Mediterranean warfare, through the development of team sports and the Olympics, to the place of spectator sports (especially football) on college campuses. Unique and accessible way to start studying the Ancient Western world.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kurt Xyst
July 3, 2014
Quarter: Autumn, Winter

Introduction to Community, Environment, and Planning (CEP 200)

with Marty Curry and Christopher Campbell
A CEP education is fully lived, not passively taken. In CEP 200, students learn how to communicate, facilitate, plan, and lead groups while exploring concepts of community, environment, and planning as defining ideas that shape our world and animate our actions. This class is perfect for freshman and sophomores looking for an active, small, community-focused, and engaging 5 credit course.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kelly Hostetler
June 3, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

GEN ST 297F: Exploring Environmental Majors at the UW

with Samantha Scherer, Trina Sterry, Joe Kobayashi
Explore the many ways to study the environment through this one credit seminar. The UW has diverse programs studying all aspects of the environment: the air, the mountains, the sea and everything between. Studying the environment means exciting field courses, hands-on research, and a chance to address some of the world’s critical issues. Weekly lectures and panels give you a chance to interact with leading research faculty, current students, and advisers from over 10 departments. This course is intended for anyone with an interest in environmental majors or minors.
Credits: 1
Recommended by Joe Kobayashi
June 2, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

C ENV 110: Food & the Environment

with Ray Hilborn
Everyone eats, and all food production has environmental consequences. Discover environmental science through food production. Explore the link between the decline of civilizations and current farmer efforts to cope with changing water supply, topsoil loss, and technology. Create a food diary and find out the environmental consequences of your diet. Understand what climate change, politics, culture, biodiversity, and geography have to do with food. For details see: http://depts.washington.edu/coenv/food/study/courses#cenv Also offered as part of a FIG (sections AB & AF)
Credits: 5
Recommended by Christen Foehring
June 2, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

EDUC 170: Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers

Elementary school mathematics is no longer considered just a collection of computational tools, but rather a rich body of intellectual content, focusing on understanding, reasoning, and communication. This course is designed to help you develop the skills that are needed for the mathematical demands of teaching. Note that this is a content course, not a methods course. This course will engage in key ideas in the elementary mathematics curriculum such as problem solving and quantitative reasoning, place value and algorithms for arithmetic, arithmetic operations, fractions, and number theory.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Lisa Murakami
August 12, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

Fairy Tales and the Environmental Imagination

with Jason Groves
This course explores the environmental cultures and values of fairy tales and folktales. Topics include enchanted forests; folk-lore, plant-lore, and animal-lore; convivial human-animal relations; hybrid nature-cultures; as well as nationalistic aspects. Critical perspectives on fairy tales will range from textual studies to ecocriticism to gender studies and queer theory. Readings are in English and drawn from diverse cultural traditions, including European tales collected by the Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Anderson, Salish tales collected by Franz Boas, multicultural recastings and reclamations of folkloric legacies, as well as Disney adaptations. Introduces literary works and cultural artifacts from a variety of different traditions, cultures, and periods. Helps students to acquire basic tools for analyzing literature and culture.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Stephanie Welch
July 10, 2017
Quarter: Autumn, Winter

LING 269: Swearing and Taboo Language

with Laura McGarrity
This course gives a great linguistic perspective on taboo language by breaking it down in terms of pragmatic, neurological, psychological, sociocultural, and legal aspects. No previous experience with linguistics is required! If you're having registration issues, please contact lingadv@uw.edu
Credits: 5
Recommended by Katie Manlove
July 7, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

ARCH 350A: Architecture of the Ancient World

with Louisa Iarocci
From the earliest stages of civilization humankind has striven to build - out of necessity and as an expression of ambition. This course traces the earliest history of architecture from its prehistoric origins to the tenth century. In lectures three times a week we will explore the built evidence of cultures as diverse as the Middle East, Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas. Building types like the temple, the tomb, the house, the church, the theater and the bridge will be considered as expression of the social life, aesthetic traditions and technological advances of the cultures that produced them. Architecture is seen not simply as a response to landscape, climate and materials, but as a form of story telling, revealing the nature of myths, politics and technology in the ancient world. Requirements: Midterm, final exam, and writing assignments. This course fulfills 3 credits of Arts and Humanities. Please contact Louisa Iarocci, liarocci@uw.edu with any questions.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Nancy Dragun
May 21, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

GWSS 490A

with Regina Lee
WRITING CREDIT! ONLINE INTERACTIONS. EXPLORES THE METAPHORS, POWER DYNAMICS, AND MECHANISMS WE USE TO THINK ABOUT AND RELATE WITH EACH OTHER ONLINE. CROSS-CULTURAL CASE STUDIES INVOLVING GENDER, POWER, AND ONLINE LABOR ARE A FEW OF THE TOPICS COVERED.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Sara Fleehart
May 5, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

PHG 200: Implications of Public Health Genomics for the Modern World

with Patricia Caorl Kuszler and Daniel Asmama Enquobahrie
Genomics, as defined by the National Human Genome Research Institute, "describes the study of all of a person's genes (the genome), including interactions of those genes with each other and with the person's environment." Recent advances in genomics give us a way to better understand how genetic and environmental factors affect human and population health. This course offers undergraduate students a starting place where they can put these factors into scientific, ethical, cultural, legal, and policy context, so that the goal of improving population health may be realized.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Ardith Feroglia
July 31, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

LSJ 490C: Climate Change, Justice, and the Law

with Brandon Derman
This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to examine the legal and international debates surrounding efforts to address the impact of climate change. This course will examine current court cases and movements for climate justice that mobilize law and rights, while exploring the connections between nature, society, and environmental and social justice. Taught by super hip Geography PhD student Brandon Derman, who gets stellar reviews in end of course evaluations. This course has no-prerequisites and is open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors in any major. Optional Writing Credit available.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Alyssa Penner
August 14, 2015
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring

URBDP 498: Planning as a Profession

with David Blum and Reema Shakra
Want to learn about urban planning, real estate, or community development? Want to network with professionals? Take this one credit class and hear from a professional each week! Past speakers have included: Dennis McLerran, Regional Administrator, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10; Marshall Foster, Deputy Director, City of Seattle Department of Planning and Development; Ellen Miller-Wolfe, Director of Economic Development, City of Kirkland; Mandi Roberts, Principal, OTAK, Inc., Kirkland; Jeremy Eknoian, Manager, Internal Operations – Real Estate Office, University of Washington.
Credits: 1
Recommended by Kelly Hostetler
November 13, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

ENV H 311: Introduction to Environmental Health

with Charles Treser
This course explores the relationship of people to their environment—how it affects their physical well being, and what they can do to protect and enhance their health and the quality of the environment. Students will be introduced to many different areas of environmental health study, from water quality and air pollution, to toxicology, epidemiology, and occupational safety. Recent group project topics have included: "Public Health Impacts of Climate Change in Puget Sound", "Genetically Modified Foods", "Nitrates in Ground Water", and "Factory Farming Health Impacts". This course is offered autumn and spring, has no prerequisites, and is open to students in all majors.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Trina Sterry
July 31, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

JSIS 200 States and Capitalism – with English Comp/Writing Link (English 298)

with Anand Yang (JSIS 200) and Elizabeth Simmons-O'Neill (ENGL 298)
STATES AND CAPITALISM -- WITH ENGLISH COMP/WRITING LINK JSIS 200 offered by senior Jackson School of International Studies faculty member Anand Yang (I&S, W), MWF 12:30-1:20 with two weekly quiz sections. FIG section SLN 16349, TuTh 12:30-1:20. JSIS 200 focuses on the origins of the modern world system in the sixteenth century and its history until World War I, with particular attention to Interacting forces of politics and economics around the globe, and to key periods of expansion and crisis. English 298D (FIG) and English 298E (open to any UW student) offered by senior English faculty member John O'Neill (C, or W if student has already fulfilled C). Non-FIG students SLN 14099 MWF 1:30-2:20, FIG section SLN 14098 MWF 11:30-12:20. English 298 is a 5 credit writing link to JSIS 200. All writing assignments in English 298 will be based on readings and assignments in JSIS 200, with a focus on developing students' reading, research, writing, revising and editing skill and confidence. While English 298 appears as "intermediate composition" in the time schedule, there are no prerequisites for this course. Any student eligible to enroll in JSIS 200 is also eligible to enroll in English 298.
Recommended by Kimberly Swayze
June 22, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

HSERV 490 S: Social Networks and Health: Methods and Applications

with Miruna Petrescu-Prahova
People are interconnected, so their health is interconnected. We are all embedded in vast social networks of friends, family, co-workers and neighbors. Come learn how your place in a network might impact your life in ways you don't even know, and how understanding social networks can help you become a better public health researcher and practitioner.
Credits: 4
Recommended by Susan Inman
July 14, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

LING 400: Survey of Linguistic Method and Theory

This course examines major linguistic theories in phonetics, phonology, syntax, semantics; explores a wide range of linguistic fields. Students learn the basics of linguistic analysis and argumentation. Open to all: no prerequisites!
Credits: 5
Recommended by Katie Langr
July 24, 2014
Quarter: Autumn, Winter

POL S 203: Introduction to International Relations

with Andrew Cockrell
What drives international relations and allows us to explain the modern world? International relations looks at the ideas behind interactions of nations, transnational organizations, and other political powers. It gives us tools to discuss some of the most contentious and difficult issues that affect the entire world: war, environmental policy, human rights, genocide, and world trade. These topics will be examined by learning the three major theories in international relations: realism, liberalism, and Marxism. No prerequisites.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Mark Weitzenkamp
August 13, 2014
Quarter: Autumn, Winter

ATM S 101: Weather

with Michael Warner
The earth's atmosphere, with emphasis on weather observations and forecasting. Daily weather map discussions. Highs, lows, fronts, clouds, storms, jet streams, air pollution, and other features of the atmosphere. Physical processes involved in weather phenomena.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Melissa P. Pritchard
June 2, 2015
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring

NUTR 200: Nutrition for Today

If you have an interest in nutrition, this is a great course to start with. It's a core course for the Nutritional Sciences Minor and is the prerequisite for almost all other NUTR courses. You'll learn about the role of nutrition in health, wellness, and prevention of chronic disease. Topics include nutrients and nutritional needs across the lifespan, food safety, body weight regulation, eating disorders, and sports nutrition. Note that this course was formerly NUTR 300, so it cannot be taken for credit if credit was earned in NUTR 300.
Credits: 4
Recommended by Kristin Elko
May 21, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

JSIS C 202

with Kyoko Tokuno
Learn how beliefs and practices of religious traditions around the world impact our world from early times to the present. Introduction to Religions provides an interdisciplinary exploration of Eastern traditions including Buddhism, Hinduism, Sikhism, Shinto, Chinese religions, Japanese religions. Accessible to students of all levels. Also an excellent foundation course for Comparative Religion majors and minors.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Linda Iltis
June 28, 2016
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer

LING 100: Fundamentals of Grammar

with Clarissa Surek-Clark
This course introduces students to the basics of grammatical concepts and terminology, moving beyond the mundane world of prescriptive 'grammar rules.' Students will learn how to analyze grammatical structures in English, delving briefly into other languages. The curriculum is designed for students taking (or preparing to take) foreign languages as it provides a new perspective of language structure; students interested in linguistics are also encouraged to take the course.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Katie Langr
August 7, 2014
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring

ATM S 111: Global Warming: Understanding the Issues

Includes a broad overview of the science of global warming. Discusses the causes, evidence, future projections, societal and environmental impacts, and potential solutions. Introduces the debate on global warming with a focus on scientific issues.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Melissa P. Pritchard
June 2, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

English 200-K — Truth and Lies in Victorian Literature

with Jessica Campbell
English 200 — Truth and Lies in Victorian Literature MW 1:30-3:20 Section K - SLN 14051 “We must cultivate the lost art of lying.” –Oscar Wilde, “The Decay of Lying” The Victorian period in England (1837-1901) was the heyday of the realist novel, but writers during the time also produced a great deal of fanciful, sensationalist, and speculative literature. In writing realist fiction, authors strove to expose societal problems and articulate human psychology in ordinary situations. But while some writers sought to convey unadorned truth in order to improve society, others insisted on the importance of inventiveness and “art for art’s sake.” Through this course, we will look at a variety of Victorian works of and about literature, realist and otherwise, that explicitly consider questions of truth, realism, storytelling, and outright lying. What were the values and dangers of telling stories? We will read serious and humorous texts, including nonfiction essays, short stories, poems, a play, and a novel.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kimberly Swayze
June 22, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

BE200: Introduction to Built Environments: Seattle on Foot

with Vikramāditya Prakāsh
Are you interested in architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, construction, and the city, but looking for a more integrated approach? Not sure where your interests in the built environment might take you? Eager to learn more about your hometown? Like exploring the city on foot? Join us for BE200 this autumn for an introduction to built environments through pre-disciplinary explorations of Seattle’s rich urban landscape, engaging themes including history and preservation, commerce, tourism, nature, health, mobility, public space, and social justice. The exciting new class will consist of lectures, group discussion sessions and self-guided city walking tours.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Daniel Coslett
June 3, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

GEOG 205: Our Global Environment

with Christine Biermann
Geography has a rich heritage of investigating the relationships between the natural environment and people, and this course will examine current environmental phenomena from a geographic perspective. The issues we will explore vary in scale from global climate change to forest change of the Pacific Northwest, but for all issues there will be an emphasis on developing a thorough understanding of how earth systems work, and how these systems are linked to social and political economic processes. Students will learn the basic biogeophysical processes underlying environmental change, the human/social dynamics that also shape environments, the multi-scalar interactions between physical and social processes, and the broader geographic perspectives on environmental issues.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Rick Roth
July 31, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

AES 150: In-Justice for All: Intersection of Race, Ethnicity, Class & Gender in the U.S.

with Professor Connie So
This course takes a look at the transnational dimensions of American concepts and histories; how race, ethnicity, nationality, class and gender impact all Americans. The course will address relationships between the oppressors and the oppressed and the power of cultural agency and diversity in the U.S. as well as allow you to explore your own identity and ethnic history. No prerequisites.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Leslie Ikeda
July 22, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

LIT 228: The Water Crisis in Literature and Film

Just sounds like an interesting way to explore the growing concern over the availability of water, and how its scarcity might impact societies. Jointly offered with FRENCH 228; CHID 270A.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Jim Scott
July 1, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

AA 496: Aeronautics & Astronautics Undergraduate Seminar

This is an excellent course to introduce the Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering content to those that might have questions, about what someone does with this major. It can also help students at all levels decide if this is an area they wish to pursue.
Credits: 1
Recommended by Marlo Anderson
July 31, 2014
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring

ESS 102: Space and Space Travel

with Erika Harnett
Take your education to the limits, of the solar system that is! ESS 102 is a great introduction to the upper limits of the Earth's atmosphere and what lies beyond. Compare the differences between Earth and the other planets in our solar system, as well as how to travel to them. Get to know the complex features of the sun, such as, how it gives us a source of energy and life, but also the deadly affects of solar radiation. This optional writing class can also count as I&S or NW credits. Plus, you get to build your very own water rocket!
Credits: 5
Recommended by Dana Hansen
August 4, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

PSYCH 200: Comparative Animal Behavior

with Michael Beecher
This course is appropriate for all students, freshmen through seniors. There are no prerequisites. Topics include “...research methods and findings of comparative animal behavior, their importance to an understanding of human behavior; rationale for study of behavioral differences and similarities between animal species, and behavior viewed as part of adaptation of each species to its natural habitat.”
Credits: 5
Recommended by Carrie Perrin
July 9, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

Afro-Peruvian Dance: Dance 231

with Lalo Izquierdo
This is a one-time opportunity to learn about Afro-Peruvian Dance from a living legend. Lalo Izquierdo is one of the founding member of the internationally acclaimed "Peru Negro" Dance Company - founded in the 1970s. No dance experience needed to take the course. SLN 22224
Credits: 2
Recommended by Kelly Canaday
July 8, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

GEOG 295: Intro to Migration

with Katharyne Mitchell
Very timely introductory course offers an evidence-based analysis of migration that ties current migration policies and practices to broader changes in the global economy. The class provides a link between general theories of migration and their specific manifestation in migration patterns worldwide. It explores a series of themes related to contemporary migration processes including transnationalism, humanitarianism, remittances, gender, asylum, and deportation.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Rick Roth
July 31, 2014
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring

CLAS 210: Greek and Roman Classics in English: the Invention of Western Literature

with Team-taught by the entire faculty of the Classics Department, with twice weekly TA-led sections
Epic, history, philosophy, tragedy, comedy, lyric, satire: invented or reinvented by the Greeks and Romans, transmitted from the ancient Mediterranean to modern world literature. Whether you are completely new to this material, or looking to connect texts already read with texts not yet read, this course will deliver to you the foundations of western literature and thought. Homer and Virgil; Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides; Herodotus and Tacitus; Catullus, Ovid and Juvenal; Sappho, Plato and more—great authors who have been shaping great conversations for over 2000 years. Open to undergraduates at all levels, with no prerequisites.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Sarah Stroup
November 24, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

SLAV 101: Slavic Lands and Peoples

with Bojan Belic
Taught by one of our most charismatic instructors, this class uses the internet to discover the Slavic peoples, their homelands, and the forces that have shaped their complex, multi-ethnic societies. Students will use various institutions' sites, government sites, social media, YouTube to look at how the Slavic peoples define themselves, and how they are regarded by the larger world. Questions about the nature of power, marginality, and communication across cultures will be addressed as you gain a comprehensive understanding of the Slavs - their politics, languages, literature, culture - with tools that you already use every day.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Shosh Westen
June 16, 2015
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer

ESS 101: Intro to Geological Sciences

Geology is all around us! From the volcanic Mt. Rainier, to glacial deposits from millions of years ago, there is a ton of geology in our back yard. Intro to Geology is a great survey course that emphasizes the dynamic datuer of the interior and exterior of our planet, and understanding of how our planet is chaning. This is a lab based couse, with field trips almost every weekend. All majors welcome!
Credits: 5
Recommended by Dana Hansen
February 12, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

EPI 220 Sexually Transmitted Infections: Causes & Consequences

Sexual health is a critical component of overall physical and mental health. This course provides an introduction to infectious disease epidemiology through the lens of sexually transmitted pathogens and is a great option for students who are exploring public health, medicine, epidemiology, and microbiology disciplines.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Susan Inman
April 29, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

CHID 480E: Eco-Cosmopolitanism: An Intro to Environmental Humanities

with Mary Childs
Do you want to explore the relationship between nature, humans, and literature, and ultimately to actively engage in concerns about our current, global environmental crisis? We will gain a background in philosophical issues that shaped early environmental thought and read selections from leading eco-critics and environmental scholars. Is it better to be rooted locally to develop a responsible ethic toward the earth, or to engage in environmental issues from a global, cosmopolitan perspective? Through all of our readings, discussions, and activities, we will work towards a definition of eco-cosmopolitanism, and ask how the humanities can help motivate a significant shift in environmental consciousness.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Cynthia Anderson
September 11, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

RUSS 120: Food in Russia

with Alaniz
"Food" is a topic much in the news in recent years. This course examines food in the Russian context, from the Middle Ages to the post-Soviet era. Through literature, cinema, art and memoir, students will delve into such matters as table manners; excess; holidays; vegetarianism; communal dining; Soviet home economics; and hunger throughout Russian history.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Shosh Westen
June 16, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

GWSS 390A

with Ivette Bayo
Collaborations in feminism and technology. A chance to explore technology through a feminist lens.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Sara Fleehart
May 5, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

Gen Studies 391N: Undergraduate Research Intensive for Community College Transfer Students

with Janice DeCosmo
This course, designed for incoming transfer students, is an initial 2-day pre-autumn quarter workshop, held September 18 & 19 on the UW-Seattle campus, followed by weekly sessions during the quarter designed to help transfer students attain and excel in undergraduate research positions. The course will demystify the research process at UW and provide instruction in research-related skills and resources. All students receive one-on-one advising with URP staff and interact with peer researchers.
Credits: 2
Recommended by Jennifer Harris
August 4, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

ARCTIC 200: Indigenous Diplomacies & International Relations in the Arctic

with Nadine Fabbi
You might know what's happening to the animals in the Arctic but do you know how it's affecting the people? The Arctic – home to 400,000 indigenous people – is emerging as one of the most dynamic regions in global geopolitics in no small part because of the role of Arctic indigenous peoples in international relations and sovereignty efforts. This course will examine the characteristics of the Arctic as an emerging region in the world including the Arctic Council, the international and national Inuit associations, Arctic foreign policy, climate change, and issues of sovereignty and security from both nation‐state and indigenous perspectives.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Monick Keo
July 23, 2015
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer

ESRM100 Environmental Science

with Robert Harrison
This course is appropriate for all students, freshmen through seniors. There are no prerequisites, just an interest in the environment. ESRM100 provides a comprehensive overview of environmental science. By using an "earth systems" approach, students recognize society and the environment as an interrelated system. Environmental issues are examined throughout the course and realistic solutions are investigated. The course can be take as an additional writing course for W credit. You get to write your papers on issues you consider critical to the environment.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Rob Harrison
June 2, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

HSTCMP 311: Science in Civilization: Antiquity to 1600

Science did not fall from the sky fully formed. The current traditions, practices, and assumptions of scientists and those who do science emerged over time through trial and error, philosophical debate, and political maneuvering. This class introduces a story of the emergence of scientific thinking from the ancient world to just before the Scientific Revolution. Strongly recommended for science majors looking for an I&S class and anyone curious about why we do science the way we do.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kurt Xyst
July 3, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

SOC Wf 200: Introduction to Social Welfare Practice

with Mary Lou Balassone, PhD
Introduction to the field of social work, including the theoretical concepts and institutional framework that guide practice. Overview of social work profession and social welfare system within which it operates. Lectures supplemented by exercises, films, guest lectures, and class discussions. Offered: A and Spring.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Linda Ruffer
July 31, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

CHID 222: Biofutures

The course explores how the rapid advances in biotechnology and bioinformatics are changing society, and forcing a rethinking of past practices. A great course for anyone, particularly students interested in the biological sciences and/or information technology.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Jim Scott
July 1, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

HSERV 490: A Practical Introduction To Ethnographic Methods In Public Health

with Stephen Bezruchka
How does one study cultures? Are there groups around UW that you are curious about and want to study? This course gets you learning ethnographic techniques to do just that. You will come away with new understanding of a culture and a grounding in how to apply those techniques in public health.
Credits: 4
Recommended by Susan Inman
July 14, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

JSIS C 357: Jewish American Literature and Culture

with Professor Joseph Butwin
Taught by a dynamic and passionate professor, this course focuses on writers from Saul Bellow to Philip Roth to Woody Allen and the Coen brothers to explore topics of universal resonance, ranging from immigration to acculturation to assimilation.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Lauren Kurland
June 28, 2016
Quarter: Autumn

ARCTIC 200: Indigenous Diplomatic & International Relations in the Arctic

with Nadine Fabbi
New course offered through the Jackson School of International Studies and the School of Oceanography. This course is also a part of the new Arctic Studies minor that was launched just the end of last year! With the rise of global warming, the Arctic has become a major topic in terms of international relations and environmentally. This course is appropriate for all students with or without prior knowledge of the topic. No prerequisites required.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Monick Keo
August 21, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

ARCH 150: Appreciation of Architecture I

with Alex Anderson
This course provides a broad introduction to architecture before the modern era. It discusses the historical evolution of architecture and the design and construction of buildings from prehistory to 1400. It addresses the cultural significance of buildings in their geographic and social contexts, fundamental design principles, building materials and construction techniques, environmental factors that affect building design, and the roles of designers, builders, patrons, clients, and users of buildings. This course precedes and complements Arch 151: Appreciation of Architecture II.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Nancy Dragun
August 14, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

EDUC 305: The Purpose of Public Schools in a Democracy

In the United States, “school” is the only compulsory institution in which we must all participate. American democracy, the idea that ‘the people’ can engage in responsible self-rule, is an on-going experiment. The original framers of American democracy believed that such a form of government required the active participation of an intelligent and prudent citizenry and almost from the start schools were viewed as central to this project for obvious reasons. As a result, public schools have been inextricably linked to the pursuit of democratic governance. Yet, Americans have struggled for centuries about how to organize schools and what those schools should teach. In recent years, state and federal education policies have narrowed the acceptable discourse of this field. Federal legislation like No Child Left Behind, federal grant competitions like Race to the Top, and pushes by corporate philanthropy toward standardization and market-base solutions have privileged certain viewpoints about the purpose of education. In this course, we will examine a wide variety of texts, participate in several kinds of discussions and conduct some research in order to better understand the relationship between schools and democracy, both historically and in contemporary society.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Lisa Murakami
August 12, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

HSERV 490: Using Economics to Solve Today’s Health Care Problems

with Norma B. Coe
Ever wonder what all the fuss is about in the health care debates? What is all of this controversy about the Affordable Care Act/ACA/Obamacare? Come ready to learn (and debate) what the field of economics has to say about the state of our health care system. This course is designed to introduce undergraduate students to the field of Health Economics, and the tools economists use to analyze current issues in health care. No Economics pre-requisites.
Credits: 4
Recommended by Susan Inman
July 14, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

RUSS 316: Extended Russian thru STEM

with Abramova
This course gives students who are already relatively proficient in spoken and written Russian (both heritage learners and students of Russian as a foreign language) the opportunity to extend their language skills to the topics of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math and develop academic language skills and social stylistic registers.
Credits: 2
Recommended by Shosh Westen
July 23, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

CHID 250C: Exploring the Politics of Play

with Terry Schenold
This course explores the politics of historical and present conceptions of play and gameplay with a special emphasis on understanding problems and potentials of contemporary digital game culture. Join in the conversation...Play is waste ...Play is Devil's work ...Play is expression ...Play is childish ...Play is life ...Play is chaos ...Play is rational ...Play is freedom ...Play is communication ...Play is significant ...Play is EDUCATION ...Play is fantasy ...Play is serious ...Play is culture ...Play is dangerous ...Play is political ...Play is evolution.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Cynthia Anderson
September 11, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

Gen Studies 391 D: Research Exposed!

with Jennifer Harris
Research Exposed offers undergraduates an opportunity to learn about current, exciting research in a wide variety of disciplines, including the process of discovery, how faculty come up with an idea for research, how inquiry is structured in the different disciplines, and how students can become involved in the knowledge-making process. Presentations by UW faculty focus on specific issues such as ethics and the culture of research. Students attend weekly, fifty-minute discussions and have the opportunity to ask the speaker questions following each presentation. This course may be repeated for credit (1 credit/quarter-3 quarters max); speakers and topics will vary.
Credits: 1
Recommended by Jennifer Harris
August 4, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

POL S 202: Introduction to American Politics

with Prof. Rebecca Thorpe
Is there more to American politics than the partisan talking heads shown in the media? This class looks at the fundamental tension between American political commitments to democracy and to individual rights. It starts with the formation of the US Constitution, and then follows some of the most important issues up to today: states rights vs. federal powers, political parties, media’s effect, voting and elections, interest groups and money in elections, the military complex, and the politics of punishment. No prerequisites.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Mark Weitzenkamp
August 13, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

HSTAA 110 & ENGL 198: History of American Citizenship

with Professors John Findlay and Elizabeth Simmons-O'Neill
History of American Citizenship, offered by senior History faculty member John Findlay (I&S, Diversity, W), examines how, when, and why different groups of people (e.g., white men, white men without property, peoples of color, women, immigrants) became eligible for citizenship throughout American history. The course explores how and why for many peoples, at many times, citizenship did not confer equal rights to all. An independent research paper connects each student's family history (or some other family's history) to broader themes in U.S. history. English 198D and E, offered by senior English faculty member Elizabeth Simmons-O'Neill (C, or W if student has already fulfilled C) are 5 credit writing links to HSTAA 110. All writing assignments in English 198D and E are based on readings and assignments in HSTAA 110, with a focus on developing students' reading, research, writing, revising and editing skill and confidence.
Credits: 10
Recommended by Kimberly Swayze
August 4, 2014
Quarter: Autumn, Winter, Spring

ENVIR 100

with Kristi Straus, Yen-Chu Weng
Environmental Studies offers interdisciplinary learning, integrating the broad range of social and natural science disciplines. This course examines contemporary environmental challenges and responses, including climate change, ocean acidification, biodiversity, social justice, and more. Students learn about the complexities involved in environmental issues and about our connections to these issues on multiple scales, from local to global. This course provides students with a dynamic and unique learning experience with an interdisciplinary teaching team.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Ann Corboy
February 6, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

GEOG 277: Intro To Cities

with Kim England
A fast-paced, wide-ranging exploration of the evolution of American urbanization and the urban built environment. Considers a vast array of related topics: the roles of transportation, economic restructuring, politics, and urban planning in producing urban change; suburbanization and urban sprawl; inner-city gentrification; and how issues of class, race, and gender are embedded in the geographies of cities. Keywords: economic/social restructuring, housing, inequality, politics and planning, urban change.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Rick Roth
July 31, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

ESRM 150: Wildlife in the Modern World

Think about all the squirrels you will see on campus what is it like for them in the "modern world?" This course is great of anyone, fun topic and relevant to all. Covers major wildlife conservation issues in North America. Some global issues are also treated. Examples of topics include the conservation of large predators, effects of toxic chemicals on wildlife, old-growth wildlife, conservation of marine wildlife, recovery of the bald eagle, and gray wolf.
Credits: 5
Recommended by lisa nordlund
August 1, 2014
Quarter: Autumn

MODHEB 101

with Hadar Khazzam-Horovitz
The course covers modern Hebrew and introduces students not only to vocabulary, grammar, and spoken communication, but also elements of modern Israeli life such as poetry, song and dance. Students are introduced to a language and culture that is both deeply rooted in the ancient world and an integral part of modern global society. The instructor, Hadar Khazzam-Horrovits, brings energy and vitality to this Elementary Modern Hebrew course.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Gabriel Skoog
July 8, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

ASTR 150: The Planets

with Dr. Toby Smith
Up-to-date and systematic "evolutionary" exploration of the planets in our solar system as compared to Earth. Less emphasis on the techniques of collecting data and more on the possible meanings of what has been found and their significance. Designed with the "non-science" student in mind.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Kurt Xyst
July 3, 2014
Quarter: Autumn, Spring

MSE 298: Introduction to Modern Materials

This 1-credit seminar is geared towards first and second year undergraduate students interested in learning more about Materials Science & Engineering. Learn about how materials are created and how they are changed for different purposes in society. Different application of materials discussed may include biomaterials, ceramics, composites, electrical, glass, metals, and polymers/plastics. Each week a different MSE faculty member will discuss their research with the class. Perfect seminar for rounding out your schedule!
Credits: 1
Recommended by Stanley Choi
February 4, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

NEAR E 296 A: Introduction to the Archeology of Egypt

with Stephanie Selover
Learn about the land of the Pharaohs! This course is an introductory survey of the archaeology, art and architecture of ancient Egypt, from the first prehistoric cultures of the Nile Valley until the period of Roman control. Through the lens of archaeology, this course explores Egyptian gods, animal deities, divine kings, pyramids, temples, mummification, society and government. Students will untangle common Egyptian beliefs about identity, religion, medicine, magic, sex, childbirth, slavery, and death through the archaeological remnants of this great civilization. Stephanie Selover is a knowledgeable and energetic instructor who brings the past alive for her students.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Gabriel Skoog
August 4, 2015
Quarter: Autumn, Summer

C LIT 200 Dynamite Reads: World Literature and the Nobel Prize

with Taught by distinguished faculty from across the Humanities (organized by Eric Ames, CLCM)
This course offers a grand tour of world literature as seen through the writings of Nobel Prize winners. Each year, it features a different group of authors from various countries, languages, and traditions. In Autumn 2017, we will read selections from Rabindranath Tagore (India, 1913 laureate), Knut Hamsun (Norway, 1920), T. S. Eliot (UK, 1948), Shmuel Yosef Agnon (Israel, 1966), Wole Soyinka (Nigeria, 1986), Derek Walcott (Saint Lucia, 1992), Kenzaburo Oe (Japan, 1994), Svetlana Alexievich (Belarus, 2015), and Bob Dylan (US, 2016). Along the way, this team-taught course also provides a unique view of the many language and literature departments at UW, including Asian, Classics, English, Near Eastern, Slavic, and Scandinavian. Lectures by faculty from each unit will explore wide-ranging questions of literature and the politics of prizes. Who wins? (Who doesn’t?) And why? What does that tell us about literature and about the world in which we live? Assignments include online discussion posts, short quizzes, and a final exam (in section). Questions? Please contact Eric Ames: eames@uw.edu
Credits: 3
Recommended by Eric Ames
April 12, 2017
Quarter: Autumn

ARCH 151: Appreciation of Architecture II

with Ann Marie Borys
This lecture course seeks this understanding of ourselves and our world primarily through historical developments in architecture from about 1400 onward, right down to today. You will be introduced to the Shakespeares and the Beethovens of architecture - the great artistic geniuses of the past (and present) and their primary works that influence our world. But you will also see some of the social and technical complexities that contribute to the shaping of the built environment in addition to artistic insight. And finally, you will also be introduced to a way of looking at architecture that will enrich your encounters with everyday buildings, not only the most memorable ones: how they stand up, what visual cues and ordering systems make them comprehensible, how human sense-based perception is just as important to our encounter with it as the physical reality of the building.
Credits: 3
Recommended by Nancy Dragun
August 14, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

CHID 280A: Indigenous Encounters

with Jose Antonio Lucero
Are you interested in race, identity, ethnicity, colonialism, and social movements? If so, this course is for you! Since the first encounters with Europeans, Indigenous peoples have played critical roles in shaping ideas of civilization, nationhood, and progress. Despite the importance of Native peoples to political processes in the Americas, they have often been marginalized or even invisibilized in contemporary discussions of democracy and development. This lecture course explores a broad set of encounters between peoples and ways of knowing. We will critically examine central concepts like “culture,” “gender,” “nature,” and “race” that shape the ways in which scholars, state officials, Indigenous leaders and intellectuals engage each other.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Cynthia Anderson
September 11, 2014
Quarter: Autumn, Winter

ENV H 111 Exploring Environment and Health Connections

with Dr. Thomas Burbacher
This course is open to all majors and has no prerequisites. It fulfills one of the admission prerequisites for the PUBLIC HEALTH major. It is also counts toward the ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH MAJOR AND MINOR. Explore the science behind the headlines! Topics covered include: • Mercury in seafood • DDT & Malaria • Flame Retardants • Air Pollution • Chemicals in the Workplace • Salmonella & Ebola • Physical & Psychosocial Risks • Zoonotic Disease
Credits: 3
Recommended by Trina Sterry
November 17, 2015
Quarter: Autumn

RUSS 110: Introduction to Russian Culture and Civilization

with Barbara Henry
This introduction to Russian culture/civilization is taught by one of the department's popular and engaging professors.
Credits: 5
Recommended by Shosh Westen
July 31, 2014

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