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Adviser Information File
Undergraduate Policies and Procedures

Guidelines for Advising EOP Students


CONTENTS       Admission to the Educational Opportunity Program
English
Mathematics
Instructional Center
Bridge Programs
Early Identification Program and McNair Program

Admission to the Educational Opportunity Program

    At the time of acceptance of admission to the UW, the Office of Admissions identifies and refers eligible students to the EOP program. Criteria for eligibility are family income and resources, level of parental education, and social or environmental barriers, all of which may have impacted students' academic experiences. A team of multi-ethnic EOP advisers provides academic advising, career counseling, and advice on financial aid, housing, and personal issues.

New and continuing students may also apply to become EOP "affiliates" by documenting educational, economic, or social barriers that have affected their academic performance or success. Affiliates are eligible for all EOP services.

  
  

English

    EOP students are encouraged to take the Universal Placement Test (UPT) for placement in English composition and math. The English portion of the UPT places students in ENGL 107 (formerly ENGL 103), 109-110 (formerly ENGL 104-105), or 131 (or any other freshman-level composition course).

  • ENGL 107 (formerly ENGL 103) is a 5-credit, CR/NC course in English as a second language. It covers reading comprehension, vocabulary, and expository writing. ENGL 107 counts toward the 180 credits required for graduation, but does not count toward the English composition requirement, additional writing, or Areas of Knowledge.
  • ENGL 109-110 (formerly ENGL 104-105) is a 10-credit graded sequence open only to students in the Educational Opportunity Program. Both courses must be taken, and credit for ENGL 109 is not granted until ENGL 110 is completed. The sequence emphasizes the development of expository writing and research writing skills. Most EOP students include ENGL 109-110 in their first year of University coursework. The sequence is not remedial. Its main purpose is to help EOP students develop writing skills necessary for success at the University and thereafter. The 10 credits counts toward the 180 credits required for graduation, but only 5 credits counts toward the English composition or additional writing requirement. The other 5 credits do not count toward English composition, additional writing, or Areas of Knowledge.
  • ENGL 131 is a 5-credit expository writing course open to all students. Students who place at this level may take ENGL 131 or any of the other introductory composition courses: ENGL 111, 121, 197, 198, 199, and C LIT 240.
  
  

Mathematics

    The math portion of the Universal Placement Test (UPT) places students in MATH 100, 102, 103, 111, 120, or 124.

  • MATH 100, 102, 103 is an algebra series similar to the first three semesters of high school algebra. MATH 100 assumes no previous experience in algebra. Each 5-credit course counts toward the 180 credits required for graduation, but none of the courses count toward the Quantitative/Symbolic Reasoning requirement or Areas of Knowledge.
  
  

Instructional Center

    The Instructional Center, 1307 N.E. 40th Street, provides academic support for EOP students. In addition to drop-in tutoring, the Center offers study skills classes, test preparation classes, graduate exam preparation, and a computer lab for students.

The Instructional Center operates in autumn, winter, spring, and summer quarters. All services are free.

  
  

Bridge Programs

    EOP Bridge Programs are intense three- and five-week programs for students admitted for autumn quarter under regular admission criteria but considered to be somewhat at academic risk. Participation in a Bridge Program is not optional; it is a condition of admission to the University. During Bridge, students take classes with UW professors, with college-level assignments and examinations. They also participate in workshops to improve in math, grammar, and communication skills. A major focus of Bridge is goal setting and strengthening affective behaviors. In 2004, there were 68 students in the Summer Bridge Program and 46 students in the Autumn Bridge Program.
  
  

Early Identification Program and McNair Program

    The Early Identification Program and the McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program, both housed in the Office of Minority Affairs, help prepare highly motivated undergraduate students who are low-income and first generation for graduate and professional school. The Early Identification Program advisers work with students on undergraduate research projects, graduate school applications, and scholarships. The McNair Program offers valuable research preparation for McNair Scholars by uniting students with faculty mentors, research conference participation, and funding research projects. The services of both offices are available to all students interested in graduate and professional programs, whether or not they are EOP students.