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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Frederick M. Lorenz
JSIS A 465
Seattle Campus

International Humanitarian Law

Investigates International Humanitarian Law (sometimes called the Law of Armed Conflict), the field concerned with rules developed by civilized nations to protect the victims of armed conflict, including the Geneva Conventions. Case studies include the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians, as well as developments in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Class description

International Humanitarian Law concerns the rules developed by civilized nations to protect the victims of armed conflict and generally limit the destructiveness of war. The course will begin with an introduction to the basic principles of international law and the historical development of the law, including the Nuremberg Tribunal and Geneva Conventions. We will use the text The Law of Armed Conflict, International Humanitarian Law in War, by Gary D. Solis (Cambridge University Press, 2010). The international criminal tribunals will be reviewed, as well as the current status of the Yugoslav Tribunal and The International Criminal Court. There will be a discussion of the "war against terrorism," and the legal basis for action pursued by the US. Case studies will include prisoner abuse allegations, targeted killing, and the classification of detainees as "unlawful combatants." Efforts to control cluster bombs and the proliferation of small arms will be discussed as well. A major part of the discussion will include current issues in the Middle East. Case studies include the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians, as well as developments in Afghanistan and Iraq. Please note that this course will be offered concurrently with a law school course and classes will be held in the law school (not Denny as indicated now). Also note that in the spring of 2014 the class will be on a compressed schedule and the last class day for undergraduates will be Wednesday May 28. There will be two Friday afternoon classes on May 2 and May 16. See the course web page for more detail.

Student learning goals

General method of instruction

Lecture, classroom discussion, and role playing exercises. Grades are based primarily on writing assignments.

Recommended preparation

Some familiarity with current events in the international arena, and a willingness to engage in classroom discussions and exercises.

Class assignments and grading

Two five-page papers (each 20% of grade), one ten-page paper (40%), and class participation (20%); no final exam.


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Syllabus
Last Update by Frederick M. Lorenz
Date: 01/29/2014