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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Nicole F. Watts
SIS 501
Seattle Campus

Seminar: Comparative International Studies

Focuses on comparison across geographical areas including comparative political economy, comparative cultures, and comparative institutions. Provides familiarity with the comparative method of inquiry, an understanding of the interplay between area studies and cross-regional theories, and skills in conducting comparative research and writing. Prerequisite: ECON 200; ECON 201. Offered: W.

Class description

Seminar in Comparative International Studies: States, Societies and Power

This course focuses on comparison across geographical areas. It provides an understanding of the interplay between area studies and cross-regional theories, familiarity with the comparative method of inquiry, and skills in conducting comparative research and writing. This quarter’s class, loosely organized around the theme of states and power, will explore a number of very different approaches to comparative study. These include historical institutionalism; subaltern studies, “constructivism” in international relations; post-modernism; and others. Readings will provide concrete, contemporary models for students’ own research. Texts include Robert Putnam, Making Democracy Work; Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish; Joel Migdal, Atul Kohli, and Vivienne Shue, eds. State Forces and Social Power: Domination and Transformation in the Third World; Margaret Keck and Kathryn Sikkink, Activists Beyond Borders; Susan Strange, The Retreat of the State; James Scott, Weapons of the Weak, and other selections.

Student learning goals

General method of instruction

Recommended preparation

Class assignments and grading

Requirements include short response papers, a longer bibliographic essay, and class participation.


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Last Update by M Jane Meyerding
Date: 10/15/2001