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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Shirley J. Yee
HSTAA 374
Seattle Campus

Social History of American Women in the Twentieth Century

Analyzes major themes in the history of women in North America from 1890 through the 1990s. Themes include family and community formation, social activism, education, paid and unpaid labor patterns, war, migration, and changing conceptions of womanhood and femininity in the twentieth century. Offered: jointly with GWSS 384.

Class description

Students will learn about major themes in 20th U.S. women's history in addition to analyzing historical sites on the world wide web, written historical documents, and oral histories and applying their analyses to a 10-12 page research project. In Winter 2008, we will focus on women's experiences in the context of the rise of consumerism and technology as well as work, war, migration, education, and social activism.

Student learning goals

Sharpen critical thinking skills through analyses of texts, films, and primary documents

Sharpen writing skills through the research and writing of a 10-15 page paper.

Sharpen speaking skills through group oral presentations

Develop research skills in the field of history through the identification and analysis of primary documents

General method of instruction

Lecture and discussion

Recommended preparation

Women 200 and/or 200-level courses in U.S. history.

Class assignments and grading

Exams and papers are designed to sharpen students'critical thinking and writing skills. Students learn how to pose research questions and to use primary sources to support an argument.

exams, papers, class participation, group oral presentation.


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Last Update by Shirley J. Yee
Date: 12/03/2007