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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Susan P Casteras
ART H 480
Seattle Campus

Art Museums: History, Theory, Practice

Explores the history of art museums in America and Europe from the nineteenth century to the present. Topics include connoisseurship and conservation, theories of design and display, architectural challenges, auction houses, dealers, curators, directors, impact of education departments, museums' changing relationship to public audiences, visual arts, and the law.

Class description

see description on website, which is as follows:

https://sites.google.com/a/uw.edu/ah480-museums13/home

Student learning goals

learn basic history of museums and collecting in the Western world

learn about major museum issues, e.g., conservation, installation concepts, curatorial realities, art and the law, etc.

gain insight about how to understand and write about exhibitions

broaden writing skills about by producing art labels, conservation report, exhibition analysis, etc.

General method of instruction

Lectures by professor and student interaction; also, some visits to local museums on-campus and off-campus

Recommended preparation

Previous classes in art history strongly recommended. Required texts as are follows (paperback versions) and have been ordered at the University Bookstore: 1 Andrew McClellan, THE ART MUSEUM FROM BOULLEE TO BILBAO 2 Konstaze Bachmann, CONSERVATION CONCERNS: A GUIDE FOR COLLECTORS AND CURATORS 3 Stephen Weil, MAKING MUSEUMS MATTER

Other optional texts will be discussed in class.

Class assignments and grading

Assignments include a 1-2 page condition report; object labels; 53-5 page exhibition analysis; 3 page curatorial report; 5 page final paper

combination of written assignments and classroom participation, with more weight given to final two assignments


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Last Update by Susan P Casteras
Date: 02/23/2013