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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Marc David Servetnick
B BIO 200
Bothell Campus

Introductory Biology II

For students intending to take advanced courses in the biological sciences or enroll in pre-professional programs. Metabolism and energetics, structure and function of biomolecules, cell structure and function, animal development. Second course in a three-quarter series (B BIO 180, B BIO 200, B BIO 220). Prerequisite: B BIO 180; either B CHEM 152 or B CHEM 153.

Class description

Central themes are the macromolecules that make up cells, and how information encoded in DNA specifies cell structure, regulates cells, and controls the development of organisms.

Major topics are: - the macromolecular components of cells (proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, carbohydrates) - structure, metabolism, respiration, and reproduction of cells; cellular energy - structure and replication of DNA, transcription of RNA, the genetic code, protein synthesis, and how cells regulate which genes are expressed. - embryonic development and its relationship to evolution

Student learning goals

Evolution - describe the macromolecular components that make up cells found in all life forms - explain how conservation of the genetic code supports the theory that all extant organisms are derived from a common ancestor - give examples illustrating how changes in DNA sequence can generate phenotypic variation

• Structure and Function o explain how the structure of biological macromolecules (phospholipids, proteins, nucleic acids) contribute to their function o describe how the three-dimensional structure of a protein enables it to carry out its function Structure and Function - explain how the structure of biological macromolecules (phospholipids, proteins, nucleic acids) contribute to their function - describe how the three-dimensional structure of a protein enables it to carry out its function

Information flow, exchange, and storage - explain how information encoded in DNA specifies protein function, and how it enables cells to carry out basic metabolic functions - give examples of how signals from a cell or from the environment are interpreted by cells

Pathways and Transformations of energy and matter - explain how cells transform the energy stored in glucose into ATP - in general terms, describe a biochemical pathway - explain how amino acids are joined to form functioning, three-dimensional proteins

Systems - explain how alteration of a single gene can have widespread effects on the organism

Process of Science - describe the scientific method, and how to apply it to biological problems. One goal is to develop your skill at constructing and testing hypotheses - conduct laboratory exercises to enhance your skills at collecting and evaluating data - interpret graphs and tabular representations of experiments and data

General method of instruction

There are two two-hour class meetings per week. These are generally lectures, with interactive clicker questions and brief student discussions. There will be several (2-3) in-class exercises during the quarter. There is one two-hour lab per week, that serves to observe biological materials, and also to learn the process of science.

Recommended preparation

Prerequisites are B BIO 180 or equivalent (Intro Biology 1), and B CHEM 152 or B CHEM 153 (or equivalent).

Class assignments and grading

For the classroom portion of the course: pre-class on-line reading quizzes, in-class clicker questions, and three problem sets. For the lab portion of the course: pre-lab on-line quizzes, worksheets to be completed in lab and/or after lab.

For Winter 2013, grades were assigned based on: (percentages are rounded)

reading quizzes 6% clicker questions 9% labs 25% problems sets 7% exams - 3 54%


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Last Update by Marc David Servetnick
Date: 11/20/2013