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Slavic Languages and Literatures

Department Overview

M253 Smith

Slavic languages and literatures include the principal East European languages and literatures as well as Slavic linguistics. Languages include Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, Bulgarian, Czech, Georgian, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Slovene, and Ukrainian.

Undergraduate Program

Adviser
M253A Smith, Box 353580
(206) 543-6848
slavicll@uw.edu

The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures offers the following programs of study

  • The Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Slavic languages and literatures with options in Russian language, literature, and culture; and Eastern European languages, literatures, and culture
  • Minors in Russian language, Russian literature/Slavic literatures, and Slavic languages

Bachelor of Arts

Suggested First- and Second-Year College Courses: First- and second-year Russian. Courses that develop writing skills.

Department Admission Requirements

Students in good academic standing may declare this major at any time.

Major Requirements

Russian Language, Literature, and Culture Option (Minimum 50 credits):

  1. RUSS 322, RUSS 323
  2. RUSS 403
  3. RUSS 451
  4. Courses from an approved list of electives to reach 50 credits. See adviser for approved list. No more than 15 credits from the following may apply: RUSS 303, RUSS 350 (only 5 credits of RUSS 350 may apply), RUSS 401, RUSS 402. Maximum 5 credits at the 100 level.
  5. Minimum 50% of credits applied to the major taken at the 300 or 400 level
  6. Minimum 2.0 grade for each course and minimum 2.50 GPA for all UW and transfer courses presented for this option
  7. Minimum 15 graded credits presented for this option must be completed through the UW

Eastern European Languages, Literature, and Culture Option (Minimum 50 credits):

  1. Principal Eastern European language to inlude one of the following: BCS 406, BCS 410, BULGR 406, CZECH 406, POLSH 406, ROMN 406, SLVN 406, UKR 406
  2. SLAV 351 (5 credits)
  3. Courses selected from preceding principal Eastern European language courses or from an approved list of electives to reach 50 credits. See adviser for approved list. Maximum 5 credits at the 100 level.
  4. Minimum 50% of credits applied to the major taken at the 300 or 400 level
  5. Minimum 2.0 grade in each course and minimum 2.50 cumulative GPA for all UW and transfer courses presented for this option.
  6. Minimum 15 graded credits presented for this option must be completed through the UW.

Continuation Policy

All students must make satisfactory academic progress in the major. Failure to do so results in probation, which can lead to dismissal from the major. For the complete continuation policy, contact the departmental adviser or refer to the department website.

Minor

Minor Requirements:

Russian Language:

  1. Minimum 25 credits to include one of the following: RUSS 303, RUSS 350, RUSS 401, RUSS 402, RUSS 403, RUSS 450.
  2. Courses selected from preceding Russian language courses or from an approved list of electives to reach 25 credits. See adviser for approved list. Maximum 5 credits allowed at the 100-level.
  3. Minimum 2.0 grade in each course presented for the minor.
  4. Minimum 15 graded credits presented for the minor must be completed through the UW.

Russian Literature/Slavic Literatures:

  1. Minimum 25 credits to include RUSS 322, RUSS 323, and 15 credits from an approved list of electives. See adviser for approved list. Maximum 5 credits allowed at the 100-level.
  2. Minimum 2.0 grade in each course presented for the minor.
  3. Minimum 15 graded credits presented for the minor must be completed through the UW.

Slavic Languages:

  1. Minimum 25 credits to include one of the following as a principal Eastern European language: BCS 406, BCS 410 (10 credits), BULGR 406, CZECH 406, POLSH 406, ROMN 406, SLVN 406, UKR 406.
  2. SLAV 351.
  3. Courses selected from the preceding principal Eastern European language courses or from an approved list of electives to reach 25 credits. See adviser for approved list. Maximum 5 credits allowed at the 100-level.
  4. Minimum 2.0 grade in each course presented for the minor.
  5. Minimum 15 graded credits presented for the minor must be completed through the UW.

Student Outcomes and Opportunities

  • Learning Objectives and Expected Outcomes: Graduating majors in Slavic languages and literatures have a solid command of the Slavic language of focus, with speaking, listening, reading, writing, and translation skills at the intermediate high or advanced level. They have a broad knowledge of the history of the relevant country, and of its modern culture. Students have a general knowledge of major periods and literature and detailed knowledge of two or three particular authors or genres. Students have a good understanding of Slavic languages in general and the language of their specialization in particular, as well as knowledge of major issues in contemporary phonology, morphology, and syntax. All students develop good general analytical skills and the ability to explore and understand another culture through mastery of its language.
  • Instructional and Research Facilities: UW Language Learning Center
  • Honors Options Available: Dobro Slovo membership is available to qualifying students (see adviser for requirements). With College Honors (Completion of Honors Core Curriculum and Departmental Honors); With Honors (Completion of Departmental Honors requirements in the major). See adviser for requirements.
  • Research, Internships, and Service Learning: Undergraduates may present their current research at the annual Slavic Student Symposium each spring. Suzzallo Library holdings include some 400,000 titles in Slavic languages and in other languages on Slavic subjects. The library subscribes to all important periodicals and newspapers in Russian and other languages and has exceptionally strong holdings in rare and antiquarian Slavic titles on microfilm and microfiche.
  • Department Scholarships: Vadim Pahn Scholarship for continued study of Russian in an intensive summer language program; Asante Outstanding Paper Prize for the best undergraduate paper written in a Slavic Department course; Polish Studies Scholarship awarded for study in Poland of the Polish language and culture.
  • Student Organizations/Associations: Rodnoi Ugolok, the Russian student society; Ukrainian Students United, the Ukrainian student society.

Graduate Program

Graduate Program Coordinator
M268 Smith, Box 353580
(206) 543-6848

The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures offers a complete program of courses and seminars leading to the Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Russian and East European languages, literatures, and cultures. Languages taught in the department include Czech, Old Church Slavonic, Polish, Russian, and Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian.

The graduate program is organized to permit completion of the master's degree in four to six quarters and the doctoral degree in three additional years. The duration of each program, however, depends on the extent of the student's preparation upon entrance into the program.

Master of Arts

Admission Requirements

A student seeking admission to the MA program should have a bachelor's degree in Russian or Slavic Studies which includes four years of Slavic language study. Applicants with equivalent experience and basic coursework in Slavic literatures, cultures, and history are considered. A student not meeting these requirements may be given conditional admission but is expected to make up any deficiencies. Consideration is given to those with three years of language who enroll in fourth-year summer intensive Russian the quarter before entry.

All students entering the program take a diagnostic language test to establish their level of proficiency and determine what further instruction may be necessary.

Examinations

  • Russian Language
  • Other Slavic Languages
  • MA Comprehensive Examinations

Degree Requirements

45 credits minimum, as follows:

  1. Slavic core courses: 10 credits from the following: RUSS 501, RUSS 502, SLAV 501, SLAV 519
  2. Slavic linguistics coursesL 10 credits from the following: SLAV 550, SLAV 551, SLAV 570
  3. Slavic literature courses (10 credits): RUSS 542, RUSS 543
  4. Second Slavic language, (5 credits): one of the following: BCS 403, BULGR 403, CZECH 403 or POLSH 403 (implies completion of 401 and 402 in the relevant language)
  5. Elective courses, 10 credits from above or from the following: BCS 406, BCS 420, CZECH 406, CZECH 420, POLSH 406, POLSH 420, RUSS 420, RUSS 421, RUSS 422, RUSS 423, RUSS 425, RUSS 426, RUSS 430, RUSS 512, RUSS 520, RUSS 521, RUSS 522, RUSS 523, RUSS 526, RUSS 570, RUSS 577, SLAV 420, SLAV 423, SLAV 425, SLAV 426, SLAV 470, SLAV 490, SLAV 520, SLAV 561, SLAV 562, SLAV 563, SLAV 565, SLAV 566, UKR 420

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission Requirements

Applicants to the doctoral program in Slavic Languages and Literatures, who are expected to possess an MA or equivalent degree, are admitted by vote of the graduate faculty on the basis of their language skills (Slavic and English), general background in Slavic cultures, and a comprehensive statement of purpose.

Degree Requirements

Minimum 90 credits, to include:

  • Coursework: At least 90 credits, including graduate credits taken toward the MA degree, and at least one full year of residence at the UW

    Readings: Many post-MA credits are satisfied with individually arranged readings courses. Courses are mutually agreed upon by the student and the Supervisory Committee chair and are organized with an eye to the comprehensive examinations. Students whose emphasis is Slavic linguistics may include a third Slavic language as a field. PhDstudents with a literature focus should take one year of a second Slavic language (401-403 sequence) or test out of 403. PhD students with a linguistics focus should take two years of one language (401-406 sequence) or at least one year of two different second Slavic languages. The student may also satisfy this requirement by demonstrating appropriate proficiency in the language(s). Students majoring in language pedagogy follow the linguistics guidelines.

  • Comprehensive Examinations: As a prerequisite for scheduling the general examination, the candidate must demonstrate reading ability in a language appropriate for research purposes. The two-hour examnation consists of a journal article (5-7 pages), which the student summarizes and a portion of which she/he translates. The particular language may be negotiated by the student with his or her adviser on the basis of the research interests of the student.

    The student takes four written field examinations, followed two weeks later by the general (oral comprehensive) examination.

    The general (oral comprehensive) examination must be set up with the Graduate School at least three weeks before the examination is scheduled. The procedure is described in the Graduate Student Services' how-to instructions on the web.

    Part of the oral comprehensive examination is usually a presentation of the dissertation proposal.

  • Dissertation and Defense

Research Facilities

The Suzzallo Library holdings include some 400,000 titles in Slavic languages and in other languages on Slavic subjects. It subscribes to all important periodicals and newspapers in Russian and other languages and has exceptionally strong holdings in rare and antiquarian Slavic titles on microfilm and microfiche.

Assistantship Opportunities

The department regularly offers a number of teaching assistantships. In conjunction with the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, students in the department are eligible for several other types of fellowships.