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International Studies

School Overview

401 Thomson

The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies organizes and supports interdisciplinary teaching and research in international affairs. The school consists of a group of interdisciplinary area-studies programs on major world regions, as well as topical and comparative programs of study that transcend national and regional boundaries.

Undergraduate Program

Adviser
111 Thomson, Box 353650
(206) 543-6001
jsisadv@uw.edu

The School of International Studies offers the following programs of study:

  • The Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Asian studies; Canadian studies; comparative religion; European studies; international studies; Jewish studies; or Latin American and Caribbean studies
  • Minors in Africa and the African diaspora; Canadian studies; China studies; comparative Islamic studies; comparative religion; European studies; international studies; Japan studies, Jewish studies, Korea studies; Latin America and Caribbean studies; Middle East studies; Russian, Eastern European, and Central Asian studies; South Asian studies, and Southeast Asian studies.
  • A minor in arctic studies (offered jointly between the Jackson School of International Studies and the School of Oceanography)

African Studies

Daniel J. Hoffman, Chair

Adviser
326 Thomson, Box 353650
(206) 616-0998
africa1@uw.edu

African studies involves a multi-campus interdisciplinary group of faculty, staff, and students who share an interest in interdisciplinary questions relating to Africa and the African diaspora. Africa-focused courses are taught in a variety of scholarly disciplines and programs, including art, music, anthropology, forestry and fisheries, geography, history, international health, American ethnic studies, and the interdisciplinary arts and sciences programs at UW Bothell and UW Tacoma. The African studies program coordinates and disseminates information on Africa-related activities; facilitates research, internships, and study abroad opportunities; and administers the Africa and African diaspora minor.

Minor

Minor Requirements 30 credits from at least three departments whose approved courses are shown on the African studies website, jsis.washington.edu/africa/, including:

  1. Minimum 15 credits at the 300 level or above
  2. Minimum 5 credits from the approved list of courses on the African diaspora
  3. Minimum 10 credits from the approved list of courses on Africa
  4. Maximum 10 credits of language courses, which may include 5 credits at the third-year level or above from the Africa-relevant languages of Arabic, French, or Portuguese and 10 credits of Swahili at the second-year level or above
  5. Other courses not on the website may be approved by the program office.
  6. Minimum 15 credits completed at the UW
  7. Minimum 2.0 grade in each course applied toward the minor

Asian Studies

The undergraduate program in Asian studies is directed by a committee consisting of the chairs of China studies, Korea studies, Japan studies, South Asian studies, and Southeast Asian studies (see below under Minors), and a designated faculty coordinator.

The Asian studies major combines language training with interdisciplinary study of an Asian region or single country. The program emphasizes social science approaches to the study of history, culture, and society, with provision for study of literature and the arts as well. Students may focus on China, Japan, Korea, South Asia (Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Tibet), Southeast Asia (Brunei, Burma [Myanmar], Cambodia, East Timor, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam), or Asia as a whole. Five interdisciplinary minors on individual countries or regions also are offered.

Bachelor of Arts

Suggested First- and Second-Year College Courses: Either JSIS 203 or JSIS A 207, and two introductory Asian civilization courses (see major requirements, below). Progress toward two years of a relevant Asian language. Courses that develop writing skills, especially in the social sciences.

Department Admission Requirements

Students in good academic standing may declare this major at any time.

Major Requirements

80 credits as follows:

  1. 30 credits or second-year equivalent language training in a language appropriate to student's concentration, plus 50 credits as follows:
  2. Either JSIS 203 or JSIS A 207 (5 credits)
  3. JSIS 201 (5 credits)
  4. An Asian civilization course in student's concentration chosen from JSIS A 212/HSTAS 212, JSIS A 241/HSTAS 241, JSIS A 242, HSTAS 201, HSTAS 202, HSTAS 211, JSIS A 206, JSIS A 221/HSTAS 221 (5 credits)
  5. 35 credits of approved coursework from one regional or country concentration, or from the general Asia concentration
  6. Approved research paper required in one of the upper-division concentration courses
  7. Minimum grade of 2.0 in all courses counted toward the major (except first- and second-year language courses, where grades must average 2.00)
  8. 30 of the 35 credits required for the concentration requirement must be taken in residence at the UW.

Minor

China Studies

Madeleine Yue Dong, Chair

Minor Requirements: 30 credits, to include the following:

  1. HSTAS 211 and either JSIS C 202 or one additional introductory Asian civilization course (10 credits)*
  2. 10 credits of electives taken at the UW, chosen from the China history/social science electives list*
  3. 5 credits of electives taken at the UW, chosen from the China history/social science list or the China arts/literature electives list*
  4. 5 additional credits in Chinese language beyond second-year level, or in upper-division transfer courses on China, or in additional electives chosen from the China history/social science electives list*
  5. Minimum grade of 2.0 required in each course applied toward the minor

*The list of Asian civilization courses and China electives is maintained by the China studies program. For the current list of such courses, see jsis.washington.edu/advise/undergraduate/minors.shtml.

Japan Studies

Minor Requirements: 30 credits, to include the following:

  1. JSIS A 241/HSTAS 241 or JSIS A 242 and one course on a different Asian civilization (10 credits)*
  2. 10 credits of electives taken at the UW, chosen from the Japan history/social science electives list*
  3. 5 credits of electives taken at the UW, chosen from either the Japan history/social science list or from the Japan arts/literature elective list*
  4. 5 credits in Japanese language beyond second-year level, or in upper-division transfer courses on Japan, or in additional electives chosen from the Japan history/social science elective list*
  5. Minimum grade of 2.0 required in each course applied toward the minor.

*The list of Asian civilization courses and Japan electives is maintained by the Japan studies program. For the current list of such courses, see jsis.washington.edu/advise/undergraduate/minors.shtml.

Korea Studies

Clark W. Sorensen, Chair

Minor Requirements: 30 credits, to include the following:

  1. JSIS A 212/HSTAS 212 and one additional introductory Asian civilization course (10 credits)*
  2. 20 credits of electives, 15 of which must be taken at the UW, to include: (a) 10 credits chosen from the list of core courses*; (b) 5 credits chosen from the list of core courses or the list of electives*; (c) 5 additional credits in Korean language beyond second-year level, or in upper-division transfer courses on Korea, or from the lists of core courses and electives*
  3. Minimum grade of 2.0 required in each course applied toward the minor.

*The lists of Asian civilization core and elective classes are maintained by the Korea studies program. For the current list of such courses, see jsis.washington.edu/advise/undergraduate/minors.shtml.

South Asian Studies

Priti Ramamurthy, Chair

Minor Requirements: 30 credits, to include the following:

  1. HSTAS 202 or JSIS A 200 (5 credits)
  2. One additional introductory Asian civilization course (5 credits)*
  3. 15 credits of electives taken at the UW, chosen from the approved list*
  4. 5 additional credits in a South Asian language beyond second-year level, or in upper-division transfer courses on South Asia, or in additional electives chosen from the approved list*
  5. Minimum grade of 2.0 required in each course applied toward the minor.

*The list of Asian civilization courses and South Asia electives is maintained by the South Asian studies program. For the current list of such courses, see jsis.washington.edu/advise/undergraduate/minors.shtml.

Southeast Asian Studies

Laurie J. Sears, Chair

Minor Requirements: 30 credits, to include the following:

  1. JSIS A 221/HSTAS 221 (5 credits)
  2. One introductory Asian civilization course (5 credits)*
  3. 15 credits of electives taken at the UW, chosen from the approved list*
  4. 5 additional credits in a Southeast Asian language beyond second-year level, or in upper division transfer courses on Southeast Asia, or from the approved list of electives*
  5. Minimum grade of 2.0 required in each course applied toward the minor.

*The list of Asian civilization courses and Southeast Asia electives is maintained by the Southeast Asia program. For the current list of such courses, see jsis.washington.edu/advise/undergraduate/minors.shtml.

Canadian Studies

Daniel Hart, Chair

Canadian studies provides a broad understanding of Canadian society, culture and communications, historical development, and contemporary problems.

Bachelor of Arts

Suggested First- and Second-Year College Courses: ECON 200, ECON 201. Progress toward two years of French language. Canadian history courses. Courses that develop writing skills.

Department Admission Requirements

Students in good academic standing may declare this major at any time.

Major Requirements

30 credits or second-year-equivalent French language training, plus 53 credits as follows:

  1. JSIS 200, JSIS 201, JSIS 202; ECON 200, ECON 201; JSIS A 356, JSIS A 498
  2. Minimum 18 credits from approved Canadian Studies elective course list

Minors

Canadian Studies Minor Requirements: 25 credits as follows:

  1. JSIS A 356 and JSIS A 498 (10 credits)
  2. 15 credits of electives chosen from an approved list*
  3. Minimum grade of 2.0 in each course applied to the minor
  4. Minimum 15 credits toward the minor completed at the UW

*The list of Canada electives is maintained by the Canadian studies program. For the current list, see jsis.washington.edu/advise/undergraduate/minors.shtml. Since the program from time to time adds, subtracts, or reclassifies approved courses, students who have planned their studies on the basis of an earlier list may fulfill the requirements of the minor as specified on that list.

Minor in Arctic Studies: See entry for Arctic Studies in the Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Programs section of the General Catalog.

Comparative Islamic Studies

Comparative Islamic studies provides a broad understanding of Islamic society, culture and communications, historical development, and contemporary problems.

Minor

Minor Requirements: 30 credits as follows:

  1. NEAR E 210/JSIS A 210 (5)
  2. NEAR E 211/JSIS C 211 or NEAR E 212/JSIS C 212 (5)
  3. 10 credits in Islamic religious traditions and texts, chosen from an approved list*
  4. 10 credits in history, society, and culture of Islam, chosen from an approved list*
  5. Minimum grade of 2.0 in each course counted toward the minor

*The approved list of Comparative Islamic studies electives is maintained by the School of International Studies. For the current list, see jsis.washington.edu/advise/undergraduate/minors.shtml. Since the school from time to time adds, subtracts, or reclassifies courses on the approved list, students who have planned their studies on the basis of an earlier list may fulfill the requirements as specified on that list.

Comparative Religion

James K. Wellman, Chair

The comparative religion major introduces students to broad theoretical issues in the academic study of religion, and encourages them to explore these issues through mastering details of the textual canons, historical traditions, social contexts, and cultural forms of religion.

Bachelor of Arts

Suggested First- and Second-Year College Courses: JSIS C 201, JSIS C 202. Courses that develop writing proficiency. Courses in particular religious traditions such as Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism. Courses in the history of civilizations such as Chinese, South Asian, and Western.

Department Admission Requirements

Students in good academic standing may declare this major at any time.

Major Requirements

55 credits as follows:

  1. JSIS C 201, JSIS C 202; JSIS B 380/CHID 380; JSIS 201
  2. 35 additional credits in comparative religion courses, of which at least 15 must be at the 300 level or above, selected from the three rubrics of textual canons, historical traditions, and social contexts and cultural forms. The distribution must include at least 5 credits and no more than 20 credits in any particular rubric.

Minor

Minor Requirements: 30 credits as follows:

  1. JSIS C 201, JSIS C 202
  2. 15 additional credits in comparative religion courses or joint-listed equivalents
  3. 5 additional credits chosen from comparative religion courses or from an approved list of electives*

*The list of approved comparative religion courses is maintained by the Comparative Religion program. For the current list of such courses, see jsis.washington.edu/advise/undergraduate/minors.shtml.

European Studies

Christine Ingebritsen, Chair

The curriculum in European studies prepares students to pursue careers requiring an understanding of all the forces, both material and cultural, contemporary and historical, that are shaping Europe today (North, South, East, and West), taking into account transitions involved in the post-Soviet era and the movement toward greater political, economic, and cultural integration among the various nations involved. Students also may concentrate, within the major, on Hellenic studies, European Union studies, or Russian, East European, and Central Asian studies.

Bachelor of Arts

Suggested First- and Second-Year College Courses: Progress toward two years of a modern European language. A survey course on modern Europe.

Department Admission Requirements

Students in good academic standing may declare this major at any time.

Major Requirements

60 credits as follows:

  1. 10 credits of a modern European language at the third-year level or beyond
  2. 20 credits of core courses, including JSIS 201, JSIS A 301, JSIS A 302, and an approved survey course on modern Europe
  3. One quarter (10 credits minimum, at least 9-10 weeks) of study in Europe
  4. 15 credits from approved list of electives, including at least one course designated as a pre-modern elective and one course designated as a global elective.
  5. Either JSIS A 494, Senior Seminar or JSIS A 495, Senior Thesis. The senior-thesis option (JSIS A 495) constitutes the major's research-intensive track. Criteria and admission procedures are described at jsis.washington.edu/advise/catalog/eur_ba.shtml.
  6. See adviser for specific course options.

Minors

Minor in European Studies

Minor Requirements: 25 credits, to include:

  1. Foreign language through the sixth quarter
  2. 15 credits of core courses including JSIS 201 (5), JSIS A 301 (5) and a survey course on modern Europe (5)
  3. 10 credits from approved list of electives

Minor in Russian, Eastern European, and Central Asian Studies

Minor Requirements: 30 credits from courses in at least three disciplines, to include:

  1. JSIS A 301 (5 credits)
  2. An approved modern REECAS survey course chosen from the approved list* (5 credits)
  3. 20 credits of electives at the 300 level or above, chosen from the approved list*
  4. Study of a regional language is encouraged, but not required. Maximum 10 credits of BCS, Czech, Estonian, Kazakh, Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish, Russian, Uighur, or Uzbek language beyond the first-year level may be applied toward the 30-credit total.
  5. Minimum 15 credits completed in residence at the UW
  6. Minimum 2.00 cumulative GPA in courses applied to the minor
  7. Minimum 18 credits outside studentís major
  8. Participation in service learning and Study Abroad programs in completing minor requirements is encouraged.
  9. *For list of approved REECAS courses, see . Since the program from time to time adds, subtracts, or reclassifies approved courses, students who plan their studies on the basis of an earlier list may fulfill requirements as specified on that list.

International Studies

Sara R. Curran, Chair

The general program in international studies gives students a comprehensive and interdisciplinary perspective on world problems and an ability to analyze the subtle interactions of politics, economics, and culture within the global system.

Bachelor of Arts

Suggested First- and Second-Year College Courses: 30 credits of a single foreign language. ECON 200, and either ECON 201 or JSIS 123/GEOG 123

Department Admission Requirements
  1. Admission is competitive, based on overall GPA, grades in the social sciences, a written statement of goals, language background, and any international experience. Before applying, students must complete ECON 200, ECON 201, or JSIS 123/GEOG 123 and either JSIS 200 or JSIS 201. Grades in these courses are given special consideration.
  2. Application deadline is the third Friday of autumn, winter, and spring quarter; students are notified by the sixth Friday of the quarter in which they apply. Transfer students must be enrolled at the UW before applying to the major.

Major Requirements

Foreign-language competency through the second-year college level, plus 70 credits as follows:

  1. ECON 200 and either ECON 201 or JSIS 123/GEOG 123; JSIS 200, JSIS 201, JSIS 202, JSIS B 330, JSIS 495, JSIS 498
  2. Three or four upper-division courses in an approved option
  3. Three upper-division interdisciplinary courses in international studies from an approved core list
  4. A research paper of approximately 25 pages to be completed in one of the courses in the student's approved option or in one of the approved interdisciplinary courses
  5. Majors are required to maintain a GPA of at least 2.50, both overall and in the program, and to earn a minimum 2.0 grade in all required Jackson School prefix courses.

Minor

Minor Requirements 30 credits as follows:

  1. 10 credits chosen from JSIS 200, JSIS 201, JSIS 202
  2. 15 credits in JSIS B-prefix courses, including at least 10 credits at the 300 or 400 level (courses with other JSIS prefixes are not eligible, but JSIS 478 may be counted).
  3. 5 additional credits chosen from courses in any of these prefixes: JSIS A, JSIS B, JSIS C, JSIS D
  4. Minimum 2.0 grade required in each course applied toward the minor.

Jewish Studies

Noam Pianko, Chair

Jewish studies takes an interdisciplinary approach to the global study of Jews, exploring the rich diversity of their cultures, their philosophies, their religious practices, their histories, their roles in politics, and other areas of contemporary life.

Areas of concentration include ancient cultures and sacred texts, modern literature and culture, Jewish languages, American Jewish studies, Sephardic studies, European Jewish studies, and Israel and Middle East studies.

Bachelor of Arts

Suggested First- and Second-Year College Courses: JSIS C 210, JSIS C 250/HIST 250. Courses that develop writing skills. Courses in international studies and world history (ancient, medieval, and modern). Modern European languages, e.g., French, German, Italian, Spanish. Progress toward two years of Hebrew.

Department Admission Requirements

Students in good academic standing may declare this major at any time.

Major Requirements

50 credits as follows:

  1. Introductory Courses (15 credits): JSIS C 210, JSIS C 250/HIST 250, JSIS 201
  2. Jewish Studies Track (20 credits): Approved courses in either the Judaic Cultural Tradition or the Jewish People in the Modern World
  3. Hebrew Language and Instruction (15 credits): A minimum of 15 credits selected from an approved list of courses appropriate to the student's track. Students must be proficient in the Hebrew language through second-year level. Students who place above second-year level in Hebrew may choose courses from one or both Jewish Studies tracks to fulfill all or part of this requirement.

The lists of Jewish studies courses are maintained by the Jewish studies program as part of its website. For the current list of such courses, see jsis.washington.edu/advise/catalog/jewish_b.shtml

Minor

Minor Requirements 30 credits as follows:

  1. JSIS C 210 and JSIS C 250/HIST 250 (10 credits)
  2. 15 credits of Jewish studies electives, chosen from the list of approved humanities/social science electives*
  3. 5 additional credits chosen from the list of approved humanities/social science electives or from courses in modern or Biblical Hebrew*
  4. 15 credits of the minor must be taken in residence at the UW.

*The list of Jewish studies electives is maintained by the Jewish studies program. For the current list of such courses, see jsis.washington.edu/advise/undergraduate/minors.shtml.

Latin American and Caribbean Studies

Jose Antonio Lucero, Chair

The Latin American and Caribbean studies major combines language study with work in history, the humanities, and the social sciences. It provides a comprehensive, interdisciplinary understanding of this major world region, emphasizing themes such as economic development, popular movements, cultural analysis, and hemispheric relations. At the same time, it gives students the option to develop their own particular disciplinary and thematic interests.

Bachelor of Arts

Suggested First- and Second-Year College Courses: Substantial progress toward completing the language requirement described below. Courses in any of the following disciplines that deal with Latin America and the Caribbean: history, literature, economics, geography, sociology, political science.

Department Admission Requirements

Students in good academic standing may declare this major at any time.

Major Requirements

52 credits plus language training, as follows:

  1. Training in two foreign languages of Latin America and the Caribbean, to include the sixth quarter (or equivalent) of one language chosen from Spanish, Portuguese, or French, and the third quarter (or equivalent) of a second of these languages
  2. JSIS 201
  3. Latin American History (10 credits): Courses to be selected from an approved list.*
  4. Contemporary Latin America (15 credits): Courses drawn from a range of disciplines including anthropology, comparative literature, geography, international studies, and Spanish. See program website for a complete list of courses.
  5. Electives (15 credits): Courses on Latin America, the Caribbean, and international studies selected from an approved list*
  6. Interdisciplinary Seminar: JSIS A 486, JSIS A 492, or another course chosen from an approved list of research seminars
  7. JSIS 493: Senior paper or project

*Lists of Latin American and Caribbean studies courses are maintained by the Latin American and Caribbean studies program as part of its website. For the current list of such courses, see jsis.washington.edu/advise/catalog/latam_ba.shtml.

Minor

Minor Requirements 30 credits as follows, plus foreign language:

  1. One year of Spanish or Portuguese, or equivalent proficiency
  2. At least 5 credits in history chosen from an approved list*
  3. At least 15 credits chosen from an approved list of courses on contemporary Latin America*
  4. At least 10 additional credits chosen from the history or contemporary Latin America lists, or from an approved list of electives*
  5. At least 20 of the 30 credits must be completed at the UW (UW foreign study programs included).
  6. Minimum 2.0 grade required in each course applied toward the minor.

*The list of Latin American and Caribbean studies courses is maintained by the Latin American and Caribbean studies program. For the current list, see http://jsis.washington.edu/advise/undergraduate/minors.shtml. Since the program from time to time adds, subtracts, or reclassifies approved courses, students who have planned their studies on the basis of an earlier list may fulfill the requirements of the minor as specified on that list.

Middle East Studies

Ellis J. Goldberg, Chair

The undergraduate curriculum in Middle East studies provides a grounding in the modern Middle East and a view of how this region fits into the world community politically, historically, and economically. To achieve this understanding, students take courses in the social sciences and the humanities, and are strongly encouraged to study a Middle Eastern language.

Minor

Minor Requirements 28-30 credits as follows:

  1. Two courses chosen from JSIS A 210/NEAR E 210, JSIS A 215/NEAR E 213, ANTH 318, HIST 161, or HIST 163
  2. 20 credits of electives chosen from the approved list.*
  3. Study of a Middle East language is encouraged, but not required. A maximum 5 credits in Arabic, modern Hebrew, Persian, or Turkish language beyond the first-year level may be applied toward the 20 credits of approved electives. No credits from any first-year language course may be counted.
  4. No more than 12 credits counted in the minor may also be counted toward requirements of a major.
  5. Minimum 15 credits of 300-/400-level courses
  6. Minimum 15 credits completed in residence at the UW Seattle campus
  7. Minimum 2.00 cumulative GPA in courses applied to the minor.

*The list of Middle East electives is maintained by the Middle East studies program. For the current list of such courses, see http://jsis.washington.edu/advise/undergraduate/minors.shtml.

Student Outcomes and Opportunities

  • Learning Objectives and Expected Outcomes: The majors offered in the School of International Studies emphasize development of critical thinking and provide a challenging framework for research and writing. Graduates attain competency in foreign language and an understanding of the political, economic, and cultural underpinnings of the global system and specific world regions. This background lays a foundation for advanced study in professional and academic disciplines, and for careers in the evolving global community. Graduates work in a wide range of jobs, depending on their interests and skills, including: Foreign Service officers, international trade specialists, political analysts, human rights associates, research assistants, social studies and language teachers, international student advisers, foreign study coordinators, program officers/managers for international non-profits and NGOs, foreign exchange specialists, international sales representatives/managers, import/export brokers, marketing analysts, associate editors/publicists, international news writers/journalists.
  • Instructional and Research Facilities: More than 1.5 million volumes in the University library system are related to international studies. The library has a large current international and domestic newspaper collection, with an emphasis on Slavic, South, and Southeast Asian papers and a selection of European papers. Specialized facilities include the East Asia Library, with a comprehensive collection of manuscripts, books, and serials on China, Japan, and Korea. The University's library holds an extensive collection of books and serials relating to South Asia. The library participates in the U.S. Library of Congress Public Law 480 program, which supplies current publications from India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka; and is a member of the South Asian Microfilm Program of the Center for Research Libraries, providing access to a large collection of microfilm newspapers, journals, and documents on South Asia.

    Jackson School undergraduates can draw upon an extensive roster of more than 500 UW Study-Abroad programs and exchanges, in 70 countries, to enrich their studies.

  • Honors Options Available: With College Honors (Completion of Honors Core Curriculum and Departmental Honors); With Honors (Completion of Departmental Honors requirements in the major). See adviser for requirements.
  • Research, Internships, and Service Learning: The School's Office of Career Services provides resources for students exploring job and internship opportunities. The Jackson School has limited funds available for students who serve as unpaid interns in nonprofit and governmental agencies. The Leslianne Shedd Memorial Internship Fund honors a Jackson School alumna killed while serving with the CIA. The Dorothy Fosdick Internship Fund is sponsored by the Henry M. Jackson Foundation in memory of the senator's foreign policy adviser. The George E. Taylor Internship Endowment supports students engaged in community-based internships. The Fathi-DiLuck Endowment supports unpaid internships with organizations in the greater Seattle area.
  • Department Scholarships: Ivy Hovey Fitch Endowed Scholarship, Neal and Helen Fosseen Endowed Scholarship, David Hughes Endowed Scholarship (tuition); Vincent H. Gowen Scholarship (undergraduate-China); Margaret Mykut Scholarships; Ayako Betty Murakami Scholarship (Japan); I. Mervin and Georgiana Gorasht Scholarship, Arthur A. Jacobovitz Scholarship, Richard M. Willner Memorial Scholarship, and Jewish Studies Advisory Board Scholarship (Jewish Studies); Katherine M. Tyler Endowed Fellowships (Asia); Eugene and Marilyn Domoto Webb Scholarship and Marilyn Domoto Webb Fellowship (Comparative Religion); Margaret Mykut scholarships, Alice Wanamaker scholarships, and Jao scholarships (undergraduate study abroad). See also the funding opportunities described under Internships.
  • Student Organizations/Associations: Jackson School Student Association

Graduate Program

Graduate Program Information
111 Thomson, Box 353650
(206) 543-6001
jsisinfo@uw.edu

The Jackson School offers graduate training leading to the Master of Arts in International Studies and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in a large number of fields. In addition to the PhD, nine programs that lead to a Master of Arts in International Studies degree: seven world area-studies programs, a comparative religion program, and a comparative and thematic program in international studies that concentrates on the interaction of international, economic, political, and cultural processes with states and societies around the world. The area-studies programs include China studies; Japan studies; Korea studies; Middle East studies; Russian, East European, and Central Asian studies; South Asian studies; and Southeast Asian studies. The comparative and thematic international studies program can be taken as a concurrent degree program with several professional schools. Specific requirements vary from one program to another, but all stress interdisciplinary study within the context of the historical cultures, contemporary situations, and languages either of the world areas or comparatively.

Master of Arts in International Studies

Admission Requirements: Applicants must meet the requirements of the Graduate School: a 3.00 GPA in the last 90 quarter (60 semester) graded credits and a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university. Submission of the scores of the general Graduate Record Examination is required. Applicants must also meet the requirements of the specific Jackson School program to which they are applying. Most require or strongly recommend previous study of an appropriate foreign language.

Degree Requirements: Students must meet Graduate School requirements for the Master of Arts, as well as individual Jackson School program requirements. Programs are designed to be completed in two years.

See also descriptions of research facilities on Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia as well as South Asia under the appropriate headings below.

China Studies

Madeleine Yue Dong, Chair

The China studies program provides a broad understanding of the Chinese people and their culture, historical development, and contemporary problems. The curriculum emphasizes the attainment of facility in Chinese language, a grounding in history, and a familiarity with the approaches of the social sciences to China studies. The cultural aspects of China are covered through offerings of several departments, with special strengths in art history and literature. The breadth of offerings allows students to select courses to meet career goals in business, government, or other professions, or to prepare for further graduate study in an academic discipline.

Admission Requirements

See above under under Master of Arts in International Studies. While not required for admission, some previous study of Chinese language is highly recommended.

Degree Requirements

36 credits, plus language training.

Chinese language training through the third year; two seminars: JSIS A 521-JSIS A 522 plus 26 credits in discipline study related to China from at least two different disciplines; two seminar papers or a thesis; comprehensive oral examination.

Comparative Religion

James K. Wellman, Chair

The comparative religion program leading to the Master of Arts in International Studies offers an interdisciplinary curriculum in the study of religion, with several choices for areas of concentration. The required core seminars focus on methodology and comparative perspective in the study of religion. For the remaining course requirements, primary and secondary curricular concentrations are available in Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, Islam, Christianity, Biblical and Near Eastern religion, and religion and culture; further secondary curricular concentrations are available in Greco-Roman religions, religions in America, East Asian indigenous traditions, African traditions, and Native American traditions.

Admission Requirements

See above under Master of Arts in International Studies. The Comparative Religion faculty reserve the right to determine in each case whether an applicant has sufficient language preparation and background in the study of religion for acceptance into the program.

Degree Requirements

Completion of the third year in a language of the primary sources in the chosen concentration, and first-year reading proficiency in a secondary foreign language necessary for reading published research (e.g., German, French); certification of basic competency in the history of world religions; JSIS B 501, JSIS B 502; JSIS B 598, a colloquium course, each quarter; one course focused on historical relations between religious traditions; at least four courses in a major concentration and two in a minor; one or two final research paper(s); and a comprehensive examination including both oral and written segments.

International Studies

Sara R. Curran, Chair

The general program in international studies provides students with broad knowledge and skills in analyzing international affairs. Designed for students entering many different professional fields, the program trains them in international and comparative studies in a multidisciplinary setting. Students are prepared to undertake sophisticated analyses of international affairs and typically hold positions after graduation with the international divisions of federal and state governments, international divisions of banks, trading companies, policy-study institutes, corporations with international operations, and international development and educational organizations. About half of all students are enrolled in a concurrent graduate professional-degree program. This adds approximately one year to the student's course of study.

Admission Requirements

See above under Master of Arts in International Studies. Those applying concurrently to a professional program (Foster School of Business, Public Affairs, Marine Affairs, Environmental and Forest Sciences, Law, or Public Health) must also be accepted by the professional school. For non-concurrent applicants, preference is given to those who have a professional interest, or previous professional experience or education. Prior study of a foreign language and preparation in intermediate-level microeconomics and macroeconomics are highly recommended.

Degree Requirements

Japanese or Chinese language through the third year or any other modern foreign language through the second year; JSIS 500, JSIS 501, and JSIS 511; courses in two of the following three foci: a regional studies focus, a professional focus, or international studies field focus (minimum three classes—9 credits—for each focus); two seminar papers or a thesis; and an oral examination. Students in concurrent graduate-degree programs also must meet Graduate School requirements for the second degree.

Japan Studies

Marie Anchordoguy, Chair

The graduate program in Japan studies gives students in-depth knowledge of many facets of Japan, including its history, political economy, society, and language. Coursework helps prepare students for careers in business, government, journalism, secondary-school teaching, and a wide variety of other professional fields. The program is specifically designed (1) for students with bachelor's degrees in a discipline who need language and interdisciplinary training on Japan to pursue their career goals, and (2) as preparation for doctoral work in an academic discipline involving Japan for students who have had little or no training on Japan or in the language. A concurrent degree program with the Foster School of Business (MAIS/MBA) is offered and other combinations (e.g., with Public Affairs and Law) can be arranged.

Admission Requirements

See above under Master of Arts in International Studies. At least one year of prior training in Japanese language is strongly recommended.

Degree Requirements

46 credits, plus language training.

Japanese language through the third year level; JSIS A 555; 46 additional credits in discipline (non-language training) course work including at least one history course and one social science course. Up to 15 credits from advanced Japanese language classes may be counted toward these 46 credits.

Korea Studies

Clark W. Sorensen, Chair

The graduate program in Korea studies offers courses in Korean language, history, and society. Regular offerings are supplemented by visiting faculty from political science, economics and economic development, folklore, and literature. The program emphasizes the study of Korea in the context of East Asian civilization and the modern world economy, not simply as a single country in isolation from its neighbors. The objective of the program is to provide students with a broad background which is of use for further graduate study, or in a variety of professions such as teaching, business, and government.

Admission Requirements

See above under Master of Arts in International Studies. Previous language training is recommended.

Degree Requirements

36 credits, plus language training.

Korean language through the third year of instruction; HSTAS 482, JSIS A 566, JSIS A 584, and JSIS A 585; 15 credits in discipline study of East Asia or international studies; two seminar papers or an essay of distinction; comprehensive oral examination.

Middle East Studies

Ellis Goldberg, Chair

The Middle East program is designed for students who wish to study the region within an interdisciplinary framework, focusing especially on the social, political, economic, and legal systems of the Middle East and/or Islamic Central Asia. To provide a thorough grounding in this region, students take courses in the social sciences, humanities, and a Middle Eastern or Central Asian language.

Admission Requirements

See above under Master of Arts in International Studies. Although knowledge of a Middle Eastern or Central Asian language is not a prerequisite for admission, it is advisable for applicants to have had at least the equivalent of one year's study of the language in which they plan to concentrate. Students accepted with no language training may wish to begin their language study in an intensive summer program.

Degree Requirements

Three 3-credit or two 5-credit Middle Eastern language courses beyond the second-year (native speakers as well as non-native speakers); 20 credits on the modern Middle East from at least two social science or humanities disciplines; one approved Jackson School course; two courses in one social science discipline or in one professional school other than courses taken for preceding requirements; either a thesis and an oral examination, or two seminar papers and a four-hour written examination.

Russian, East European, and Central Asian Studies

Scott Radnitz, Chair

Designed primarily for students with bachelor's degrees in a discipline, the program offers a background for professional pursuits in government and nongovernmental organizations, journalism, business, or teaching, or for advanced graduate study leading to the PhD degree in a discipline or in International Studies. The program includes language training, a concentration of study in a chosen discipline, and a combination of courses in other disciplines that deal with aspects of the area. Students usually focus on one region (Russia, East Europe, the Baltic States, or Central Asia), although the program provides flexibility to take courses on another region.

Admission Requirements

See above under Master of Arts in International Studies. A prerequisite for all applicants is two years of college-level language courses or the equivalent. For those focusing on Russia the language must be Russian; for other regions of the former Soviet Union and East Europe, two years of a language of the region, or another relevant language.

Degree Requirements

48 credits, plus language training.

Including the two years required for entry, four years of a language of the region being studied or two years each of two relevant languages (four years of Russian required for Russian focus); JSIS A 504; JSIS A 514, and JSIS A 515; 30 credits in disciplines other than language, with 15-20 credits in a discipline of concentration; 5 credits in a minor field and 10-15 credits in other REECAS-related courses; a thesis (9 credits of JSIS 700); and an oral interdisciplinary examination.

Research Facilities: The University of Washington is a major center for research on Eastern Europe, Russia, and the independent states of the former Soviet Union, notably the Baltic States and the countries of Central Asia. In addition to extensive holdings in Russian, East European, and Baltic language materials, the library has one of the best Central Asian language collections in the country and the largest collection of Latvian books outside Latvia. The strengths of the program are complemented by strong programs in East Asian and Middle Eastern Studies.

Graduate Certificate in Russin, East European, and Central Asian Studies

The Graduate Certificate in Russian, East European, Central Asia Studies (REECAS) is designed for graduate students to acquire in-depth knowledge of REECA regions and to develop interdisciplinary analytical and academic skills by taking sixteen student-credit hours at the 500 level or above. The certificate is an added qualification for students already pursuing professional, master's, or doctoral degrees.

Eligible students include: matriculated graduate students, matriculated professional students, and international scholars and fellows engaged in research and funded training programs at UW.

Objectives:

  • Provide a thorough grounding in REECA history and key economic, social and political issues affecting contemporary society in the region
  • Improve oral and written communication skills
  • Enhance understanding of the relationship between REECA and other areas of the world and provide answers to global questions of political, social, cultural, and environmental change.

Requirements (16 credits): JSIS A 504; two elective REECA focused courses (10 credits); certificate capstone (1 credit).

A maximum of six of these credits may apply to a studentís degree program (these ďdouble countedĒ credits must be elective coursework in the degree program).

South Asian Studies

Anand Yang, Chair

The South Asian studies program is designed for students whose career objectives involve teaching and research in a traditional discipline with geographical interests within South Asia (i.e., India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Tibet, and Nepal); those planning to enter professional-training programs (e.g., education, business administration, journalism, law, or public affairs); or students planning a career in government service (e.g., the Foreign Service) who wish to acquire a special understanding of the South Asia area.

Admission Requirements

See above under Master of Arts in International Studies.

Degree Requirements

Completion of the third year of a South Asian language to include at least 7 credits at the 400 level or above; JSIS A 508, JSIS A 509, JSIS A 510; 21 credits in coursework from at least two different departments, focused primarily on South Asia or in courses taught by South Asia faculty on topics relevant to the student's specializations (students may take a maximum of 10 credits not focused on South Asia, nor taught by South Asia faculty, to help fulfill disciplinary or professional objectives); two seminar papers or a thesis; a comprehensive oral examination.

Research Facilities: The University of Washington library holds an extensive collection of books and serials relating to South Asia. The library participates in the U.S. Library of Congress Public Law 480 program, which supplies current publications from India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka; and is a member of the South Asian Microfilm Program of the Center for Research Libraries, providing access to a large collection of microfilm newspapers, journals, and documents on South Asia.

Graduate Certificate in South Asian Studies

The certificate, an added qualification for students already pursuing professional, master's, or doctoral degrees, helps students acquire in-depth knowledge of South Asia and develop interdisciplinary, analytical, and academic skills by taking four relevant courses. Eligible participants include matriculated graduate students, matriculated professional students, non-matriculated graduate students, and international scholars and fellows engaged in research and funded training programs at UW.

Objectives include grounding in South Asian history and key economic, social, and political issues affecting contemporary South Asia; understanding the relationship between South Asia and other areas of the world, and considering global questions of political, social, cultural, and environmental change; improving oral and written communication skills; developing interdisciplinary analytical and thinking skills.

Requirements (16 credits): JSIS A 508; JSIS A 509; one elective South-Asia-focused course (5); JSIS A 513, capstone portfolio (1).

Southeast Asian Studies

Laurie J. Sears, Chair

The Southeast Asian Studies program offers students a framework within which to carry out interdisciplinary study of the peoples and nations of insular and mainland Southeast Asia -- Brunei, Burma, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Timor Loro'sae, and Vietnam. The curriculum combines training in one or more Southeast Asian languages with study of various aspects of modern and classical Southeast Asian civilizations.

Admission Requirements

See above under Master of Arts in International Studies.

Degree Requirements

36 credits, plus language training.

Completion of the third year of a Southeast Asian language; JSIS A 506, JSIS A 580/HSTAS 530, JSIS A 582/HSTAS 532; 21 credits in coursework from at least two different departments, focused primarily on Southeast Asia or in courses taught by Southeast Asia faculty on topics relevant to the student's specializations (students may take a maximum of 5 credits not focused on Southeast Asia, nor taught by Southeast Asia faculty, to help fulfill disciplinary or professional objectives); a thesis or a non-thesis project (e.g., papers, documentary film, or performance project).

Doctor of Philosophy

Saadia M. Pekkanen, Director

The Jackson School PhD program seeks to integrate the renowned area-based capabilities of its existing graduate programs, with leading-edge scholarship and practice in the field of international studies. Its objective is to create scholars combining a deep knowledge of areas and regions in the context of contemporary global themes, policy challenges, and real-world problems.

The Jackson School PhD in International Studies is framed around four foundational fields that provide cohesion across our existing area-based graduate programs and courses: (1) "Religions, Cultures, and Civilizations (RCC)," which exposes students to the diversity of cultural and religious life anchored in concrete studies of world areas, histories, cultural and political movements, as well as religious institutions and practices; (2) "States, Markets, and Societies (SMS)," which exposes students to theoretical and empirical debates about the engagement of states with their societies and with transnational actors in their historical, political, and social settings; (3) "Peace, Violence, and Security (PVS)," which exposes students to theoretical and foreign policy debates about global security challenges, conflicts, and violence, as well as issues of their prevention; and (4) "Law, Rights, and Governance (LRG)," which exposes students to theoretical and policy debates about the causes and consequences of legal evolution, rule of law, and a broad range of governance concerns in world affairs.

The Jackson School PhD Program offers a two-track option for the dissertation. One track involves writing three thematically-linked article-length research papers; the other track requires writing one book-length monograph. Students choose the appropriate track in consultation with their advisers. Doctoral candidates are required (i) to situate their dissertations under an overarching theme/topic in one of the four foundational fields of the PhD Program, and (ii) to also ground them in one of the existing area-based MAIS degrees in the Jackson School.

Admission Requirements

  1. Master's Degree
  2. Statement of Purpose: detailing research question/interests in at least one of the four foundational fields of the PhD program and at least one of the area-based MAIS programs; and also identifying relevant JSIS faculty member(s) for research supervision
  3. Writing Sample: published or unpublished sample/excerpt (not to exceed 40 pages) demonstrating ability to write critically and analytically
  4. Curriculum Vitae
  5. Three Letters of Recommendation
  6. All Undergraduate and Graduate Transcripts
  7. Language: in most fields of study prior language study is an asset, and stronger applicants normally have knowledge of relevant language sufficient for research
  8. All Test Scores: GRE General Test Scores and TOEFL (for international students) sent directly by the Educational Testing Service

Degree Requirements

Along with Graduate School requirements, 100 credits minimum as follows:

  1. Approval of 28 transfer credits corresponding to previous graduate level work; completion of 45 JSIS PhD program credits including introduction to international and area studies course, research tutorial, two field seminars, two specialization courses, two methods courses; and completion of 27 dissertation credits
  2. Submission of proposed course of study form, Quarterly Progress Review (QPR) meetings with the director of the PhD program, and Annual Progress Review (APR) reports to the PhD program committee
  3. Satisfactory performance in the research tutorial, including formal capstone presentation
  4. Submission of request for establishing doctoral Supervisory Committee
  5. Satisfactory performance in the PhD general examination, consisting of three written examinations (two in PhD program fields, one in area-based field), and an oral examination
  6. Establishment of official doctoral reading committee
  7. Satisfactory performance in dissertation prospectus defense to doctoral reading committee
  8. Preparation and writing of doctoral dissertation (either three thematically-linked article-length research papers or one multi-chapter book-length monograph) acceptable to doctoral reading committee
  9. Satisfactory performance in a final examination, consisting of oral defense of the written dissertation

Research Facilities:

Along with entry to the UW library system with one of the most extensive collection of materials related to international and area studies in the world, students have access to the wide range of research resources, facilities, and networks of formal programs in the Jackson School, including those on Africa, Canada, China, Comparative Religion, Europe, Japan, Jewish Studies, Korea, Latin America and the Caribbean, Middle East, Russia, East European and Central Asia, South Asia, and Southeast Asia. Students also have access to programs and resources of Title-VI National Resource Centers (NRCs) in the Jackson School, including the Canadian Studies Center, Center for Global Studies, Center for West European Studies, East Asia Center, The Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies, Middle East Center, South Asia Center, and Southeast Asia Center. Students can also avail themselves of the resources of other centers at the Jackson School, including the Center for Human Rights, Center for Korea Studies, East Asia Resources Center, European Union Center of Excellence, and the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Center. Students can also draw on the Jackson Schoolís affiliation with the Center for Statistics and the Social Sciences (CSSS) for training and research purposes.

Research and training facilities for specific areas include the following: For East Asia, students have access to the East Asia Library, with a comprehensive collection of manuscripts, books, and serials on China, Japan, and Korea. In addition, the University is affiliated with the Inter-University Program for Chinese Language Studies in Beijing, language programs in Japan and the People's Republic of China sponsored by the Council on International Educational Exchange, the Inter-University Center for Japanese Language Studies in Yokohama, and other programs which provide intensive language training for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. For descriptions of research facilities in other areas, see Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia as well as South Asia under the appropriate headings above.

Financial Aid:

Determinations about financial awards are made at the time of admission and during the course of a studentís time at JSIS. Funding guarantees for consecutive years is contingent upon satisfactory academic progress. All accepted doctoral candidates are automatically considered for fellowships, teaching assistantships, and research assistantships. Financial support is available on a competitive basis to U.S. citizens and permanent residents in the form of Title VI Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowships. Additional funding comes from the masterís-level programs as well as other sources in the Jackson School.