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School of Medicine

School Overview

Dean
Paul G. Ramsey
C314 Health Sciences

Established in 1946, the School of Medicine is the only medical school directly serving the states of Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho (WWAMI). Located in the Warren G. Magnuson Health Sciences Center, the School operates a decentralized program of medical education (WWAMI) via a regional network of teaching affiliates.

The School's basic-science departments provide educational opportunities for students from all schools and colleges within the University. Clinical teaching programs are conducted at the University of Washington Medical Center, Harborview Medical Center, Seattle Children's hospital, Northwest Hospital & Medical Center, Valley Medical Center, and the Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Healthcare System, as well as at other clinical affiliates in Seattle and throughout the WWAMI states.

The School admits approximately 240 medical students to its first-year class and has a total enrollment of over 1000 students pursuing the Doctor of Medicine degree. The full-time faculty numbers more than 2,100 members and there are more than 4,500 clinical faculty located throughout the WWAMI region. The affiliated University residency-training network enrolls more than 1,200 house officers. Enrollment in the graduate programs in the basic sciences exceeds 600 students, and approximately 1,000 postdoctoral fellows are enrolled in advanced training programs. The School has baccalaureate and/or graduate programs in occupational therapy, physical therapy, prosthetics and orthotics, and medical technology. The School participates in training a broad spectrum of other allied health professionals. The School is also home for the Physician Assistant Training Program known as MEDEX.

WWAMI Program

The WWAMI program was initiated in 1971 as an effort to address the maldistribution and shortage of physicians in the Northwest region, provide a broader range of educational opportunities for students, and address the need for primary-care physicians oriented toward rural practice. It is an integral part of the undergraduate medical curriculum and is a fully accredited program of the School of Medicine. The WWAMI program is named for the five states (Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho) that share resources and responsibilities in the regional educational program. Funds appropriated to the WWAMI program by the Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho legislatures assure each state of positions for its students in the entering medical class each year.

Foundations of Science Phase Training

The UW School of Medicine is nationally recognized for its regional training program (WWAMI). In addition to providing unique clinical learning opportunities, the WWAMI program allows a small-group learning experience at the regional training sites, which many students prefer. Students from Washington (Spokane), Alaska, Montana, and Idaho complete their 18-month foundational curriculum in small learning groups in their respective home states. Wyoming students complete their first 12-month foundational curriculum in Wyoming. The state of Washington provides two sites for medical students to complete their 18-month foundations curriculum:

Seattle: uwmedicine.washington.edu/Education/Md-Program

Spokane: www.medicalsciences.wsu.edu/prospectivestudents/wwamiprograminfo.html

Small group learning experiences are available in Spokane. All Washington residents are required to rank one or more of these two sites in order of preference in their secondary application. Every effort is made to match accepted Washington students with one of their preferred sites.

More information and video testimonials from first-year Spokane medical students are available at: http://uwmedicine.washington.edu/Education/MD-Program/Admissions/

Offers of acceptance are conditional upon agreement to participate in the WWAMI program.

Patient Care Phase Training

At the conclusion of the foundations–of- science phase, students enter the portion of the curriculum that is predominantly clinical. Required, selective, and elective clerkships are described below. As part of clinical training, students complete clerkships at the UW, at its affiliated hospitals, or at community clinical units located in the five-state region. During third- and fourth-year clerkships, School of Medicine full-time and clinical faculty members provide supervised clinical training in required as well as elective clerkships throughout the WWAMI region.

Academic Programs

Bachelor of Science

A program leading to a baccalaureate degree with a major in microbiology is offered through the College of Arts and Sciences.

Bachelor of Clinical Health Sciences

A program leading to a baccalaureate degree with a major in clinical health services is offered through the MEDEX program.

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology

A curriculum in medical laboratory science is offered by the Department of Laboratory Medicine. This program provides study in basic laboratory science that includes clinical laboratory training and is designed to prepare knowledgeable and skilled laboratory scientists for a variety of employment opportunities. Information concerning admission to the medical laboratory science program appears under Laboratory Medicine in this catalog.

Bachelor of Science in Prosthetics and Orthotics

The Department of Rehabilitation Medicine offers a Bachelor of Science degree in prosthetics and orthotics. The curriculum provides professional training in the basic sciences and the clinical application, design, and fabrication of prostheses and orthoses. Information concerning admission to the curriculum in prosthetics and orthotics may be found under Rehabilitation Medicine in this catalog.

MEDEX Northwest Physician Assistant Training

MEDEX Northwest, UW School of Medicine, is a program designed to train physician assistants. The program has been in existence since 1978 and is accredited by ARC-PA, the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant. MEDEX currently trains approximately 80 students annually in three didactic training sites (Seattle, Yakima, and Spokane). Discussions are currently underway to have a fourth training site in Anchorage, AK. Students return to their home communities in the WWAMI region (Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, Idaho) plus a variety of sites in Oregon and Nevada for their clinical year of training.

MEDEX Northwest is currently an eight-quarter program. The first four quarters consist of intense clinical and didactic instruction at one of the didactic training sites. The final four quarters are spent in clinical experiences throughout the Northwest region. At the completion of the program, students are eligible to sit for the National Certifying Examination for Physician Assistants.

Master of Occupational Therapy

The Department of Rehabilitation Medicine offers agraduate degree in occupational therapy. The curriculum provides professional training in the health sciences and in the theory and practice of occupational therapy as it impacts occupational performance across the life span and in the various arenas of practice. Occupational therapy addresses daily living skills including self-care, work, and leisure/play. Information concerning admission to the occupational therapy program appears under Rehabilitation Medicine in this catalog.

Doctor of Physical Therapy

The Department of Rehabilitation Medicine offers a graduate degree in physical therapy. The curriculum provides professional education in the basic sciences and in the clinical use of physical therapy evaluation and management strategies in the treatment or prevention of neuromusculoskeletal dysfunction. Information concerning admission to the physical therapy program appears under Rehabilitation Medicine in this catalog.

Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy

Work leading to master's and doctoral degrees is offered, in accordance with the requirements of the Graduate School, in the departments of Biochemistry, Bioengineering, Biological Structure, Immunology, Microbiology, Pathology, Pharmacology, and Physiology and Biophysics. Master's degree programs are offered by the departments of Laboratory Medicine, Medical History and Ethics, and Rehabilitation Medicine. Students may work toward these degrees concurrently with the MD degree, taking additional years beyond the typical four-year medical curriculum.

Concurrent degrees are possible in many other departments and colleges of the University. Recent graduates have pursued concurrent degrees in the basic sciences of medicine and the School of Public Health. A student who intends to work toward a graduate degree should confer with the chairperson of the department in which graduate study is to be pursued and with the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs of the School of Medicine. Specific requirements for admission to work for advanced degrees appear in the Graduate School section of this catalog. Permission to pursue advanced degrees is granted to medical students only if they are progressing normally in the medical curriculum and show evidence of being able to take on this additional work load.

Doctor of Medicine

Upon completion of the curriculum of the School of Medicine curriculum, the MD degree is awarded to those candidates who (1) have shown evidence of good moral character, (2) have satisfactorily completed the requirements of the curriculum, (3) have fulfilled all special requirements, and (4) have discharged all indebtedness to the University.

Admission

Procedures and policies described are subject to change. The most current information regarding the admission process is available from the School of Medicine Admissions Office.

Selection Factors

Candidates are considered comparatively on the basis of academic performance, motivation, maturity, personal integrity, and demonstrated humanitarian qualities. A knowledge of, and exposure to, the needs of individuals and society and an awareness of healthcare delivery issues are desired. Extenuating circumstances in an applicant's background are evaluated.

Applicants submit scores from the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), taken no later than autumn of the year before matriculation. Scores cannot be more than three years old at the time of matriculation.

Under exceptional circumstances, certain course requirements may be waived for individuals who present unusual achievements and academic promise. All candidates must demonstrate substantial academic ability in their major field as well as in required science courses. They should be proficient in the use of the English language, basic mathematics, personal computing, and information technologies.

All entrants in recent years have, at a minimum, fulfilled requirements for a bachelor’s degree. No specific major is advised. A broad background in the humanities and liberal arts is encouraged.

Pre-Medical Requirements

Completed prior to matriculation but preferably by the time of application; undergraduate or postbaccalaureate courses completed at a college or university accredited by the appropriate regional accrediting body.

Courses must include a minimum of:

  1. 4 semesters or 6 quarters of social science or humanities
  2. 6 semesters or 9 quarters of chemistry and biology. Subject matter in these courses must include general chemistry, general biology, biochemistry, molecular genetics, and cell biology/cell physiology, although applicants are not required to take courses with these specific titles.
  3. 2 semesters or 3 quarters of physics; or 1 semester or 2 quarters of physics plus 1 semester or 2 quarters of calculus or linear algebra

Courses recommended, but not required:

  • Ethics
  • Anatomy or comparative anatomy
  • Human or mammalian physiology
  • Embryology

For further information, consult:

Under exceptional circumstances certain course requirements may be waived for individuals who present unusual achievements and academic promise.

Application Procedure

The UW participates in the American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS). Deadline for submitting an application to AMCAS is October 15; no waivers are granted. After receiving the application, the School of Medicine asks qualified individuals to submit a $35 application fee and supplemental application materials. Every attempt is made to notify applicants of final action by the end of March of the year of matriculation.

Residents of the states of Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, or Idaho are eligible to apply. Candidates from Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho submit residency certifications from their respective state certifying officers. Proof of legal residence for Washington residents also may be requested. Determination of state of legal residence is not made by the School of Medicine. More information about residency certification is available at: www.uwmedicine.org/education/md-program/admissions/applicants/residence-certification

Applicants with DACA status who reside in a WWAMI (Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, Idaho) state and who are legally authorized and recognized by their respective state’s residency office as a state resident for WWAMI educational purposes are considered.

Applicants from outside this five-state region from disadvantaged backgrounds or who have demonstrated a commitment to serving underserved populations are considered. Foreign applicants must also have a permanent-resident visa.

Individuals with a demonstrated interest in research may apply for the MD/PhD program (Medical Scientist Training Program, or MSTP) regardless of residency.

Applicants who have failed to meet minimum standards at this or another medical (MD or DO) or dental school are not considered.

Applicants must meet essential requirements and technical standards and complete premedical course requirements.

The deadline for submitting additional application materials is December 1. Secondary materials include:

  1. Autobiographical statement in which the candidate describes the origin and development of his or her motivation to be a physician, with specific emphasis on steps taken to explore a career in medicine and eventual professional goals. Other issues of importance to the candidate should also be included. The applicant may request that the personal comments section of the AMCAS application be used to fulfill this requirement.
  2. Three additional short essays (250 word limit each)
    1. How have your experiences prepared you to be a physician?
    2. How do you imagine your personal and professional lives intersecting10 years from now?
    3. What obstacles to your goals have you experienced and how have you dealt with them?
    4. For re-applicants: From your most recent application until now, how have you strengthened your application?
  3. A letter of recommendation from a premedical committee or a minimum three letters from writers who can speak to one or more of the following: academic ability, commitment to service, leadership potential, clinical or research experiences, interpersonal skills, ability to function on a team, and/or potential as a physician. The collection of letters should provide a balanced and well-rounded view of the applicant’s candidacy. The School of Medicine accepts up to three additional letters of recommendation. Letters from current employers may be advantageous. All letters are submitted via the AMCAS Letters of Evaluation/Recommendation service. Letters must be received by December 1.
  4. $35 non-refundable application fee (automatically waived for those qualified for AMCAS fee waivers). Others seeking a fee waiver should submit requests directly to the School of Medicine Admissions Office.
  5. Online acknowledgment of having read, understood, and being able to meet, with or without reasonable accommodation, the Essential Requirements of Medical Education at the UW School of Medicine: Admission, Retention, and Graduation Standards; and online acknowledgment of the clinical clerkship rotation policy and the UW SOM Honor Code. These are sent with the secondary application form.
  6. All acceptances are contingent on a criminal background check. Falsifying information may lead to withdrawal of an acceptance.
  7. More information about the application procedure is available at: www.uwmedicine.org/admissions

Medical School Curriculum (For students entering 2015 or 2016; in effect for these two cohorts from 2015 to 2020)

The four-year medical school curriculum consists of three phases, totaling 267 credits

  • Foundations Phase – 107 credits
  • Patient Care Phase – 84 credits
  • Explore and Focus Phase – 76 credits

Specific requirements are as follows:

  1. Foundations Phase
  2. The first 18 months of the medical-student curriculum, starting with a two-week clinical immersion that introduces the medical profession and includes instruction and supervision related to basic clinical skills, is followed by eight integrated basic science blocks. Pathology, Human Form and Function (anatomy and radiology), and Pharmacology are threaded throughout all blocks of the Foundations Phase. In the longitudinal Foundations of Clinical Medicine (FCM) course, which spans all 18 months of the Foundations Phase, students learn under supervision to perform a detailed medical history and physical examination, develop clinical reasoning skills, and communicate and establish rapport with patients from all backgrounds. They also spend one full day every other week working with patients and other health professionals in outpatient primary care clinics.

    Foundations Phase Curriculum (107 credits)

    Most students are also able to take elective courses.

    1. Blocked Courses
      1. Molecular and Cellular Basis of Disease (11 credits)
      2. Invaders and Defenders (10 credits)
      3. Circulatory Systems (16 credits)
      4. Blood and Cancer (5 credits)
      5. Energetics and Homeostasis (10 credits)
      6. Mind, Brain, and Behavior (14 credits)
      7. Lifecycle (8 credits)
    2. Longitudinal Courses
      1. Primary Care Practicum (8 credits)
      2. Foundations of Clinical Medicine (8 credits)
    3. Scholarship Courses
      1. Independent Investigative Inquiry (III) (6 credits) – Conducted in one or more of the biological, behavioral, sociocultural, or epidemiological sciences basic to medicine, culminating in a scholarly product or written paper. Helps the student gain an understanding of the philosophy and methods of scientific investigation. Fosters skills of life-long learning.
    4. Consolidation and Transition (11 credits) – A transition period between the Foundation Phase and the Parent Care Phase. Preparation for U.S. Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE step 1), including a Foundations Capstone to review key concepts. Students complete the Independent Investigative Inquiry and the transition to clerkships.

  1. Patient Care Phase
  2. Students work as junior members of medical-care teams in medical-school-affiliated hospitals, clinics, or practices located in the five-state WWAMI region. Students learn and practice clinical skills, gain clinical experience, and increase clinical problem-solving abilities.

    Patient Care Curriculum (84 credits)

      1. Family Medicine (12 credits)
      2. Internal Medicine (24 credits)
      3. Obstetrics/Gynecology (12 credits)
      4. Pediatrics (12 credits)
      5. Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (12 credits)
      6. Surgery (12 credits)
  1. Explore and Focus Phase
  2. Students continue to hone clinical skills and prepare for residency. Includes four required clerkships and 20 weeks of clinical electives.

    Explore and Focus Curriculum (76 credits)

      1. Neurology/Neurosurgery (8 credits)
      2. Emergency Medicine (8 credits)
      3. Advanced Patient Care (16 credits)
      4. Clinical electives (40 credits)*
      5. Transition to Residency (4 credits)

    *Students in the Medical Scientist Training Program and the UW Pathology fellowship who enter the UWSOM prior to 2015 and who do not engage in the clinical curriculum immediately after completing pre-clinical coursework meet the clinical requirements as they exist at the time they enter, with the exception of 8 credits of clinical electives which are waived. These students enter the clinical curriculum in summer of their third year of MD coursework after completion of the PhD or UW Pathology fellowship.

Medical School Curriculum (For students entering 2017 or after)

The four-year medical school curriculum consists of three phases, totaling 287 credits.

  • Foundations Phase – 120 credits
  • Patient Care Phase – 86 credits
  • Explore and Focus Phase – 81 credits

An Ecology of Health and Medicine course spans all three phases of the curriculum. Students gain familiarity and understanding of our healthcare system, including specifics about health policy, patient safety, social determinants of health, health equity, value-based care, population health, teamwork, medical informatics, and ethics/professionalism.

  1. Foundations Phase
  2. The first 18 months of the medical-student curriculum, starting with a two-week clinical immersion that introduces the medical profession and includes instruction and supervision related to basic clinical skills, is followed by eight integrated basic science blocks. Pathology, Human Form and Function (anatomy and radiology), and Pharmacology are threaded throughout all blocks of the Foundations Phase. In the longitudinal Foundations of Clinical Medicine (FCM) course, which spans all 18 months of the Foundations Phase, students learn under supervision to perform a detailed medical history and physical examination, develop clinical reasoning skills, and communicate and establish rapport with patients from all backgrounds. They also spend one full day every other week working with patients and other health professionals in outpatient primary care clinics.

    Foundations Phase Curriculum (120 credits)

    Most students are also able to take elective courses.

    1. Blocked Courses
      1. Molecular and Cellular Basis of Disease (11 credits)
      2. Invaders and Defenders (10 credits)
      3. Circulatory Systems (16 credits)
      4. Blood and Cancer and Muskuloskeletal (8 credits)
      5. Energetics and Homeostasis (10 credits)
      6. Mind, Brain, and Behavior (14 credits)
      7. Lifecycle (8 credits)
    2. Longitudinal Courses
      1. Foundations of Clinical medicine (16 credits)
      2. Ecology of Health and Medicine (4 credits)
    3. Scholarship Courses
      1. Independent Investigative Inquiry (6 credits) – Conducted in one or more of the biological, behavioral, sociocultural, or epidemiological sciences basic to medicine, culminating in a scholarly product or written paper. Helps the student gain an understanding of the philosophy and methods of scientific investigation. Fosters skills of life-long learning.
      2. Research Methods, including Epidemiology and Biostatistics (6 credits)
    4. Consolidation and Transition (11 credits) – A transition period between the Foundation Phase and the Patient Care Phase. Preparation for U.S. Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE step 1), including a Foundations Capstone to review key concepts. Students complete the Independent Investigative Inquiry and the transition to clerkships.

  1. Patient Care Phase
  2. Students work as junior members of medical-care teams in medical-school-affiliated hospitals, clinics, or practices located in the five-state WWAMI region. Students learn and practice clinical skills, gain clinical experience, and increase clinical problem-solving abilities.

    Patient Care Curriculum (86 credits)

      1. Family Medicine (12 credits)
      2. Internal Medicine (24 credits)
      3. Obstetrics/Gynecology (12 credits)
      4. Pediatrics (12 credits)
      5. Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (12 credits)
      6. Surgery (12 credits)
      7. Ecology of Health and Medicine (2 credits)
  1. Explore and Focus Phase
  2. Students continue to hone clinical skills and prepare for residency. Includes four required clerkships and 20 weeks of clinical electives.

    Explore and Focus Curriculum (81 credits)

      1. Neurology/Neurosurgery (8 credits)
      2. Emergency Medicine (8 credits)
      3. Advanced Patient Care (16 credits)
      4. Clinical electives (40 credits)*
      5. Ecology of Health and Medicine (1 credit)
      6. Transition to Residency (8 credits)

    *Students in the Medical Scientist Training Program and the UW Pathology fellowship who enter the UWSOM prior to 2015 and who do not engage in the clinical curriculum immediately after completing pre-clinical coursework meet the clinical requirements as they exist at the time they enter, with the exception of 8 credits of clinical electives which are waived. These students enter the clinical curriculum in summer of their third year of MD courses after completion of the PhD or UW Pathology fellowship.

Student Evaluation and Promotion

Students must complete all curricular, academic, and professional conduct requirements, which include meeting the Essential Requirements and Technical Standards and demonstrating attitudes and behavior appropriate to a career in medicine. Student evaluation is based on observation of the student’s behavior and conduct by the faculty and others involved in teaching as well as on papers and examinations. Every student must pass all academic requirements, all School of Medicine examinations, Steps 1 and 2 of the United States Medical Licensing Examinations, and an approved scholarly Independent Investigative Inquiry project, as well as demonstrating specific clinical skills developmental benchmarks c before receiving the Doctor of Medicine degree. No exceptions are permitted. Periodic reviews of student performance are conducted by the School's Student Progress Committee. Students are informed of deficiencies and remedial requirements, if any, for these deficiencies.

A student may be dismissed from the School of Medicine if s/he does not meet the standards for graduation set by the School, to include failure to maintain an acceptable academic record, failure to follow academic directives provided by the School's committees, and/or failure to develop attitudes and behavioral patterns appropriate to a career in medicine. A pattern of documented concerns about a student’s performance and professionalism may result in the student’s being dismissed.

The Faculty Council on Academic Affairs (FCAA) reviews the School of Medicine’s and Student Progress Committee's actions, and the Dean of the School of Medicine has final approval of the committee's and council's recommendations. A review mechanism is available. Once dismissal or withdrawal from the School has occurred, the student may not petition for reinstatement, and must instead apply for readmission through the standard admission process and procedures.

Honor Societies

Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA), a national honor medical society, elects members on the basis of high scholarship and good moral character. AOA recognizes and perpetuates excellence in the medical profession, with goals to promote scholarship and research in medical school, encourage high standards and conduct, and recognize high attainment in medical science, practice, and related fields.

Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS), a national honor medical society, elects members on the basis of high scholarship and good moral character. GHHS recognizes individuals who are exemplars of humanistic patient care and who can serve as role models, mentors, and leaders in medicine. Goals involve promoting humanism and patient-centered care throughout the medical profession.

Grading System

The Curriculum Office implements and manages guidelines governing the grading system. The Associate Dean for Curriculum collaborates with course and clerkship directors and Foundations and Clinical Regional Assistant Deans who oversee compliance. The Student Progress Committee reviews all fail grades and the performance of students whose evaluations include a pattern of evaluator or professional development concerns.

Final Course Grades

  1. Pass/Fail: Required Foundations Phase blocks
  2. Pass/Fail: Independent Investigative Inquiry (III)
  3. Honors/High Pass/Pass/Fail: Required Patient Care Phase and Career Explore and Focus Phase clerkships and clinical electives (All clerkships 8 credits or longer have the option of H/HP/P/F and clerkships less than 8 credits are Pass/Fail only.)
  4. Evaluator Concern: internal designation
  5. Professional Development Assessment: internal designation
  6. Withdrawal

If completion of an additional paper or project is required for achievement of an Honors grade in a required or elective clinical course, all requirements for the Honors grade must be completed no later than the last day of the course. Fail grades are reviewed by the Student Progress Committee.

The School of Medicine reserves the right to revise or modify the curriculum, system of evaluation, or graduation requirements.

Graduation with Honors

A degree of Doctor of Medicine with honors may be awarded to students with high achievement who have demonstrated initiative and success in clinical and scholarly pursuits related to medicine, outstanding leadership, or exceptional service commitment. Graduation with honors may be awarded for up to 15% of the graduating class. High honors may be awarded to recognize outstanding and truly exceptional performances of a few selected students, and may not be given each year. Nominations are submitted by department and College faculty, honorees are selected by the Student Progress Committee, and final recipients are approved by the Medical School Executive Committee.

The Center for Health Equity Diversity and Inclusion (CEDI)

The Center for Health Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (CEDI) operates throughout the School of Medicine, including the WWAMI region’s teaching, patient care, and research programs. CEDI offers educational opportunities to develop expertise in patient care of vulnerable populations through its pathway programs and classes. CEDI collaborates with departments and divisions, general medical education, academic affairs, and teaching programs in the WWAMI region. Pipeline programs include outreach to underrepresented middle and high school students through the Doctor for a Day Program, the national Summer Health Professions Education Program (SHPEP), the UW Health Professions Academy (HPA), and support of five URM medical student affinity groups. Residents, fellows, and faculty are also supported through UW Network of Underrepresented Residents and Fellows (UWNURF) and the Committee on Minority Faculty Advancement (CMFA). The Center also collaborates across campuses and with other two- and four-year colleges and universities to engage in recruiting disadvantaged and underrepresented students in the WWAMI region.

Pathways and Classes: CEDI manages three pathway programs that prepare medical students to provide culturally responsive care to specific populations – done through coursework and elective clerkships tied specifically to those populations. Pathway programs include: Hispanic Health Pathway, Indian Health Pathway, and LGBTQ Health Pathway. Medical students may also expand their skills working with vulnerable populations through two other programs – the Global Health Pathway and the Underserved Pathway. Some students elect more than one program concurrently. Beyond courses required for a pathway program, students may elect classes on African American Health and Healthcare Disparities and Clinical Management of the Transgender Patient (one of few such classes offered nationally).

Summer Health Professions Education Program: In collaboration with the UW School of Dentistry and the School of Public Health, CEDI offers a six-week summer program for freshman and sophomore college students from underrepresented and disadvantaged backgrounds with an interest in health careers. The 80 admitted students engage in clinical shadowing experiences; take enrichment classes that include biology, chemistry, physics, biostatistics, and public health; and complete a class that helps them prepare for applying to health professions schools. UW housing, stipends, and travel assistance are available.

Health Professions Academy: For underrepresented minority and disadvantaged UW undergraduate students interested in careers in medicine and dentistry. Offers longitudinal advising; assistance with MCAT (Medical College Admission Test) and DAT (Dental Admissions Test) preparation; and clinical shadowing, research, and networking opportunities.

Student Groups: CEDI manages five groups for underrepresented minorities: Asian Pacific American Medical Students Association (APAMSA), Latino Medical Students Association (LMSA), Medicine Wheel Society (MWS), Queer Medical Student Association (QMed), and Student National Medical Association (SNMA). These organizations involve students in activities including Doctor for a Day – a pipeline program that introduces health careers to underrepresented minority middle and high school students. UWSOM also manages other student organizations including Muslim Health Professionals of Greater Puget Sound (MHP), Alliance for Equal Representation in Medicine (AFERM), Health Equity Circle (HEC), and Students for an Anti-Racist UWSOM (SARU).

Residents/Fellows and Faculty: CEDI provides programming for underrepresented minority (URM) residents, and fellows and faculty. The UW Network for Underrepresented Residents and Fellows (UWNURF) collaborates with the Student National Medical Association (SNMA) to host Doctor for a Day events. They also plan town halls and didactic lectures, attend conferences to recruit URM students to UW sub-internships and residency programs, and host monthly networking events. The Committee on Minority Faculty Advancement (CMFA) often sponsors underrepresented speakers from other universities to speak about health disparities; works to support junior faculty; and provides other networking opportunities. CEDI also created the African American Roundtable to discuss ways to recruit and support African American students in medicine.

Diversity in Hiring: A search committee toolkit based on best/effective practices in searches, selection, promotion, and retention of diverse faculty offers trainings for departments and divisions on implicit bias and hiring processes.

Inquiries and requests for additional information may be obtained from the Center for Health Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion, Box 357430, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-7430; (206) 685-2489, or at www.mycedi.org

Medical Scientist Training (MD/PhD) Program

Highly qualified candidates have a wide choice of research specializations. Participating graduate departments and interdepartmental disciplines include biochemistry, bioengineering, chemistry, environmental health, epidemiology, genetics, immunology, microbiology, molecular biotechnology, pathology, pharmacology, and physiology and biophysics. Participating programs include neuroscience, molecular and cellular biology, and molecular medicine and mechanisms of disease. Students may also conduct research at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Candidates submit an application and any supplemental material requested by January 1. Consideration is given to applicants with significant research experience and/or a minimum 3.50 cumulative GPA, or minimum MCAT scores of 10 in each category.

Applicants correspond directly with the administrator of the Medical Scientist Training
Program: MSTP
University of Washington
Health Sciences Building, Room I264
Box 357470
Seattle WA 98195-7470
(206) 685-0762
mstp@uw.edu
www.mstp.washington.edu

Financial Information

Fees and Other Charges

All fees and extra service charges are payable in U.S. dollars, due at the time specified and subject to change without notice. See Financial Aid Budget Information for current tuition and fees at: www.uwmedicine.org/education/md-program/current-students/student-affairs/financial-aid/budget-information

Financial Assistance

Financial aid awards are based on need. All aid applicants must submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The Federal Direct Stafford Loan (subsidized and unsubsidized), Perkins Loan, and Primary Care Loan are the primary sources of aid. Institutional loans are also available from the School of Medicine. Limited grant funds are available to Washington State residents who meet specific funding criteria.

Scholarships are available through the School of Medicine. A separate application for a School of Medicine scholarship is due May 31.

February 28 is the financial aid application deadline for all available aid sources. Late applicants are awarded only Stafford and unsubsidized Stafford loans.

Outside employment is discouraged while the student is enrolled in medical school.

Enrichment Opportunities

Students may explore working in rural or urban clinics in medically underserved communities, undertaking medical research projects, or participating in an international exchange program with a developing country. Two of the more formally structured programs include:

  1. Rural/Underserved Opportunities Program (RUOP) exposes students to rural medicine and utilizes clinical training sites in all five states. During a summer month between the first and second academic years, students work with physicians in small communities and urban underserved clinics.
  2. Medical Student Research Training Program offers research opportunities to UW medical students the summer between the first and second years. Student trainees receive a stipend. The project is 10 weeks, full-time, 40 hours per week. The student may not be enrolled in courses for credit during this time

Graduate Medical Education and Postdoctoral Training

The UW School of Medicine offers residency and fellowship programs. Training occurs at the UW Medical Center, Harborview Medical Center, Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle Children's hospital, and other affiliated training sites in Seattle and throughout the WWAMI region. Postdoctoral research fellowship opportunities in the basic sciences are also offered.

Continuing Medical Education

Offerings include short courses of one to three days, one- to two-week board-review courses, visiting professorships, preceptorships, and mini-residencies. Other offerings include lecture series at hospitals, video-tape presentations, self-directed instructional materials, and other specific courses requested by members of the medical community throughout the WWAMI region. Information is available at www.uwcme.org.

All physicians are invited to participate in continuing medical education programs offered by clinical departments, such as grand rounds and regular conference series.

The UW School of Medicine is accredited to sponsor continuing medical education for physicians. All programs sponsored by Continuing Medical Education are applicable to physician re-licensure requirements of the Washington Board of Medical Examiners and for Category I credit of the Physician's Recognition Award of the American Medical Association. Prescribed credit for the American Academy of Family Physicians and other types of credit are included in the program offerings when appropriate.

For information concerning Continuing Medical Education programs, contact:

University of Washington School of Medicine
Office of Continuing Medical Education
Box 359441
4333 Brooklyn Ave NE
Seattle, Washington 98195
Telephone: (206) 543-1050
Email: cme@uw.edu
Website: www.uwcme.org