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School of Dentistry

School Overview

Dean

Joel Berg
D322 Health Sciences

Established in 1945, the University of Washington School of Dentistry offers courses leading to a Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) degree, and advanced education leading to a Master of Science in Dentistry degree and/or a certificate of proficiency in endodontics, oral medicine, orthodontics, pediatric dentistry, periodontics, and prosthodontics. Residency training is available in oral and maxillofacial surgery and general practice. The Department of Oral Biology offers a Master of Science (MS), an MS non-thesis degree for dental hygiene educators, and a doctoral degree (PhD). Postdoctoral study is available in various disciplines. The School has also offered a baccalaureate degree completion program in dental hygiene, but students are no longer being accepted into this program.

Opportunities to earn other degrees concurrently (MS or PhD in the School of Dentistry's Department of Oral Biology and other schools) may be arranged on an individual basis.

These educational programs are enriched by the School's strong commitment to Research and the presence of a Regional Clinical Dental Research Center, the Northwest Center to Reduce Oral Health Disparities, Northwest PRECEDENT, an affiliation with the Institute of Translational Health Sciences (ITHS,) and a fellowship Research training program for predoctoral and postdoctoral students. The mission of the Regional Clinical Dental Research Center is to foster clinically relevant Research that advances dentistry's knowledge base, improves patient care, and promotes oral health. The Disparities Center performs Research aimed at reducing oral health disparities in the Pacific Northwest. Northwest PRECEDENT is the Practice-based Research Collaborative in Evidence-based DENTistry. Founded in 2005, this network of dental practices has established the infrastructure to perform a wide variety of oral health Research studies across a five-state region covering Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Utah and Washington. The mission of the ITHS is to create, enable, and sustain innovative translational Research and Research collaborations across disciplines and professions which accelerates the development of concepts and tangible products that improve human health. State-of-the-art clinical Research facilities are available for faculty and student use.

School of Dentistry Mission Statement: "The School of Dentistry shares the University's overall mission to generate, disseminate, and preserve knowledge and serve the community. The School is an integral part of the Warren G. Magnuson Health Sciences Center and is an oral health-care center of excellence serving the people of the state of Washington and the Pacific Northwest. The primary mission, through educational, Research, and service programs, is to prepare students to be competent oral health-care professionals. The School's Research programs contribute to the fundamental understanding of biologic processes and to the behavioral, biomedical, and clinical aspects of oral health. The service mission is to improve the health and well-being of the people of the community and the region through outreach programs that are especially attentive to minority and underserved populations. The School values diversity in its students, staff, faculty, and patient populations. It seeks to foster an environment of mutual respect where objectivity, imaginative inquiry, and the free exchange of ideas can flourish to facilitate personal development, professionalism, and a strong sense of self-worth." (August 2002)

The following departments participate in the curriculum for the School's programs:

  • Dental Public Health Sciences is concerned with the social, legal, political, economic, and psychological aspects of dental health-care delivery as well as the epidemiology of oral diseases and the application of biostatistical methods in studying them.
  • Endodontics offers training in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and injuries of the tooth pulp and periradicular tissues.
  • Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery trains students in the procedures used for all types of operations in the oral cavity and all phases of dental pain control.
  • Oral Biology encompasses the study of basic biological mechanisms in normal and diseased oral tissues and structures.
  • Oral Medicine provides training in diagnostic techniques and nonsurgical treatments of oral disease.
  • Orthodontics provides training in the prevention and correction of malocclusion of the teeth.
  • Pediatric Dentistry provides students with a broad understanding of prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of most dental needs from infancy through adolescence with emphasis on the psychological and educational requirements of the patient and parent.
  • Periodontics offers training relative to the periodontium and dental implants, with emphasis placed on diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and maintenance.
  • Restorative Dentistry offers training in the restoration or replacement of tooth structure and study of the form and function of the masticatory structures, and fabrication and maintenance of removable, complete, immediate, and partial dentures and dental implants.

Undergraduate Program

Dental hygiene seeks to understand why some people get preventable oral diseases and why others do not. Risk factors, such as poverty, ethnicity, and education, as well as environment, contribute to perpetuation of these diseases. The dental hygienist observes and defines dental diseases, assesses potential outcomes of interventions, and manages conditions that compromise oral health. As an applied discipline, dental hygiene links its theoretical foundation to behavioral and natural sciences. Using evidence-based science, the discipline seeks to facilitate holistic assessments of individuals and communities and to find solutions to oral health problems. Students in the discipline learn to transfer learning from clinical to community contexts as a means of improving the oral health status among people.

Adviser
D583 Health Sciences, Box 357475
(206) 543-5820
dhyg@uw.edu

The Dental hygiene degree completion program offers the following program of study:

  • Bachelor of Science degree with a major in dental hygiene.

The UW has no pre-licensure program in dental hygiene.

Bachelor of Science

Suggested First- and Second-Year Courses: Students desiring entry into the dental hygiene profession may take their first-year general education courses in chemistry, psychology, sociology, public speaking, English composition, mathematics, nutrition, microbiology, and liberal studies at the UW, or another community, technical, or four-year institution. Having successfully completed a pre-licensure dental hygiene program and obtained a license to practice dental hygiene, students are eligible to return to the UW to complete the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in dental hygiene.

Department Admission Requirements

The dental hygiene program is not accepting new applicants. Please contact the program for further information.

Major Requirements

Following completion of a pre-licensure dental hygiene program and being licensed to practice dental hygiene, students must complete UW general education requirements as well as dental hygiene major requirements to obtain the BS degree. UW requirements include a 45-credit senior residency; English, writing, and quantitative reasoning proficiencies; and Areas of Knowledge courses. The dental hygiene major requirements include a sequence of three dental-hygiene core courses and a minimum of one path.

Completion of the required major and UW requirements takes one to two years. Students planning to graduate in one year must have a faculty-approved plan of study within the first quarter of enrollment. Students planning a two-year program must have a faculty-approved plan of study within the first two quarters of enrollment. All students must meet with a program adviser yearly and are encouraged to meet with one quarterly.

Core Requirement

Students complete a year-long core requirement founded on significant oral health problems and probable solutions within the context of specific communities. Behavioral change, community development, health education models, and scientific literature provide a theoretical foundation for study in the core courses. The core curriculum focuses on real problems in real places. Using a people-places-problems approach, students use Internet and library resources to Research, analyze, discuss, and make evidence-based decisions relevant to oral health promotion and dental disease prevention. Further, they explore core values, ethics, laws, and issues related to care access, health promotion/disease prevention approaches, and healthcare delivery models. Included are field activities linked to education, government, business, and health resources. Additionally, dental hygiene majors complete requirements in at least one path and may take electives of their choice to complete the senior residency requirement. All students must complete the three core courses, D HYG 465, D HYG 492, and D HYG 493 (3 credits each, total 9) in the prescribed order.

Path Requirement

Students must select at least one of two pathways to fulfill the path requirement. The options are as follows:

Dental Hygiene Care. This path is for dental hygienists who desire to work as clinicians in hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, or other healthcare services that require advanced clinical and management skills. Students take courses in interdisciplinary health sciences, along with courses that focus on dental hygiene care and management of persons with physical, mental, developmental, and complex medical disabilities. Required courses in oral medicine augment this path. Major requirements include a minimum of 11 or 12 credits beyond the core: 10 credits in ORALM 460, or approved alternatives that focus on care of special clients; 3 credits of approved interdisciplinary health science courses; and 2 credits of approved Research.

Oral Health Promotion. This path is for dental hygienists who desire to work in multicultural and multidisciplinary settings at the local, state, national, or international levels and who require skills beyond clinical expertise. Students learn about the framework within which societies organize and manage their healthcare services and learn to link health with the environment, people's beliefs, ways of life, and kinship. They learn about differences between Western, Eastern and Shamanistic philosophies of health as prerequisites to developing educational strategies for oral health promotion and dental disease prevention. As students build skills essential for working with health agencies, they participate in community health projects as educators, advocates, or Researchers. Activities focus on the health of children and families in rural and remote areas of Washington state. Major requirements for this path include a minimum of 15 credits beyond the core, to include 3 credits in approved interdisciplinary health sciences courses, 3 credits in healthcare delivery systems, D HYG 402 or substitute; 3 credits in health promotion strategies (D HYG 403) or approved substitute; and a minimum of 4 credits in at least two sections of D HYG 404 or approved substitutes.

Academic Standards

Minimum 2.5 grade in each dental hygiene course counted toward satisfaction of graduation requirements. Minimum 2.00 cumulative GPA for all work done in residence at the University. A student whose cumulative GPA falls below 2.00 in any quarter is placed on academic probation.

Student Outcomes and Opportunities

  • Learning Objectives and Expected Outcomes: The UW dental hygiene completion program emphasizes the health of populations rather than of individuals. Dental hygienists conduct community assessments; develop networks that engage community partners; set priorities; obtain baseline measures; set targets; and measure progress toward solutions to community oral health problems. Dental hygiene core skills include the ability to search and retrieve information from the Internet; use census, geographic, and demographic data; critically assess scientific literature; analyze and interpret data; and apply new scientific knowledge to solutions of health problems. In addition to the core knowledge set, dental hygienists select from two paths of study: care of special populations and oral health promotion. Depending upon area of interest, graduates pursue careers as business managers, marketing specialists, clinic administrators, hospital and nursing home dental hygienists, public health planners, program managers, Research assistants, and teachers of dental hygiene.
  • Honors Options Available: For Interdisciplinary Honors, see University Honors Program.
  • Research, Internships, and Service Learning:

    Students in the undergraduate program take off-campus service-learning courses related to their path of study. Generally, sites are located in rural and underserved health provider shortage areas of Washington state, but may include regional, national, or international locations.

    Students are eligible for international programs and exchanges following completion of their core course requirements. An applicant who is a dental hygienist from an affiliated international institution may be eligible for a tuition waiver during one or more quarters of the regular academic year (autumn, winter, spring). Students interested in these opportunities must contact the program's academic adviser at least six months in advance.

    Majors may be eligible, following the completion of prerequisite courses, to participate in study-abroad programs that focus on health care delivery, oral health promotion, or dental disease prevention. The University and its affiliated sites provide the settings for fieldwork, service, and Research activities, and interdisciplinary learning experiences.

  • Department Scholarships: Students may apply for scholarships offered by the Dental Hygiene Education fund.
  • Student Organizations/Associations: The Washington Rural Health Organization, Washington State Public Health Association, Washington State Dental Hygienists' Association, American Dental Education Association, and International Association of Dental Research are among many from which to select.

Of Special Note: The 90-credit community college transfer limit does not apply to students admitted to this program. The last 45 credits for the degree, however, must be earned in residence at the UW.

Graduate Programs

Through their respective departments, the graduate faculty members of the School offer programs leading to the degrees of Master of Science in Dentistry, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy, as well as postgraduate certificate programs.

Master of Science in Dentistry/Postgraduate Certificates

Fields of study for the MSD programs include endodontics, oral pathology, oral medicine and orofacial pain, orthodontics, pediatric dentistry, periodontics, and prosthodontics. Although students may enroll in a graduate certificate program only, they may elect to pursue an MSD. Programs are planned to prepare students to think independently, to evaluate their own services and the literature of the programs, and to develop clinical skills to a level to permit successful clinical practice, teaching, or Research in their chosen specialty. Emphasis is placed on the basic principles of diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of the programs is not only to train students in their respective specialties but also to encourage preparation for academic careers or for Research. Research may be undertaken in basic or applied science. Opportunities for collaborative Research are available with the cooperation of other colleges, schools, or departments of the University.

Postgraduate certificate programs are not administered by the Graduate School, and no thesis is required. The course content may vary somewhat from the MSD program, although the same academic standards are applied in both programs. Tuition and fees are assessed at the graduate level for both programs.

Master of Science in Dentistry

Admission Requirements

  1. Either a baccalaureate or a professional degree from a dental or medical school.
  2. Completed application and application fee of $65
  3. Three letters of recommendation
  4. 200-300 word statement of educational and professional objectives which includes a general area of Research interest and academic goals. Optional: a personal statement that addresses the relationship between personal background and aspirations
  5. A brief biographical sketch in a resume/CV format
  6. Official transcripts, sent directly to the department
  7. GRE General Test scores
  8. TOEFL -- required for international students. The minimum TOEFL score required is 237 computer, 580 paper, iBT 70 (based only on listening, reading, and writing sections).

Degree Requirements

50 credits, to include:

  1. Required courses(Approximately 35 credits from this list): ORALB 564 (1-3, max. 10), ORALB 565 (1-3, max. 10), ORALB 566 (2-4, max. 16), ORALB 569 (2), PERIO 575 (1-3, max. 30), ORALB 570 (1-3, max. 9), ORALB 575 (1-3, max. 10), ORALB 579 (2); either ORALB 591 (1-2, max. 2), ORALB 592 (1-2, max. 2), or DPHS 568 (3); for foreign-trained dentists and non-dentists: ORALB 572 (3), PATH 544 (2/3, max. 5)
  2. Recommended electives (Approximately 15 credits from this list): DPHS 569 (2), MEBI 520 (2), ORALB 562 (1-5, max. 10), ORALB 574 (3), PATH 501 (1, max. 9), PATH 552 (2-5, max. 30)
  3. Research: Fulfilled by either a report on experimentation carried out by the student in one of the laboratories, or a case report with review of the literature. Students interested in a more Research-intensive experience should consider enrolling in the MS in Oral Biology (thesis) program.
  4. Teaching: Students are encouraged to take elective courses offered through the Department of Medical Education and Graduate School.
  5. Note: At present, this program is not certified by the American Board of Oral Pathology.

Master of Science in Dentistry, Endodontics

Admission Requirements

  1. Professional degree from a dental school
  2. Completed application and application fee of $65
  3. Three letters of recommendation
  4. A personal statement that addresses the relationship between the student's personal background and aspirations
  5. Brief biographical sketch in a resume/CV format
  6. Official transcripts, sent directly to the Department of Endodontics (international applicants must also send official transcripts to the Graduate School)
  7. GRE General Test - required only from applicants who graduated from a non-ADA-accredited dental school
  8. TOEFL - required for international students. The minimum TOEFL score required is 237 computer, 580 paper, iBT 70 (based only on listening, reading, and writing sections).

Degree Requirements

Minimum 148 credits, to include:

  1. Students who have adequate backgrounds in required courses may, on presentation of appropriate documentation, be excused from required courses at the discretion of the program director.
  2. Required core courses: ENDO 561 (2), ENDO 580 through ENDO 587 (2 credits each), ENDO 590 (2, max. 16), ENDO 593 (1, max. 3), ENDO 594 (1), ENDO 600 (var.), ENDO 658 (1), ENDO 660 (4, max. 32), DENT 565 (2), DENT 568 (1-3, max. 6), DPHS 568 (3), DPHS 569 (2), ORALB 569 (2), ORALB 574 (3), ORALB 579 (2), ORALB 591 (1-2), ORALB 592 (1-2), ORALM 580 (2), ORTHO 580 (3), PERIO 567 (1, max. 3), PERIO 582 (1, max. 12), PERIO 585 (1, max. 12), PERIO 586 (1, max. 9).
  3. Non-thesis Research: A non-thesis Research study is required. During the first year, each student is encouraged to gain familiarity with Research in progress and to help identify an area of special interest. Then, a preceptor and Research advisory committee is appointed and the student begins Research work. The master's defense is concerned with the Research subject matter and is conducted as an open seminar followed by examination by the advisory committee.
  4. Teaching: Students audit predoctoral lecture courses in endodontics, assist with teaching in the predoctoral endodontics laboratory course, and supervise predoctoral dental students working in the endodontic clinic.

Master of Science, Oral Biology

Admission Requirements

  1. Either a baccalaureate or a professional degree from a dental or medical school
  2. Completed application and application fee of $65
  3. Three letters of recommendation
  4. 200-300 word statement of educational and professional objectives which includes a general area of Research interest and academic goals. Optional - a personal statement that addresses the relationship between the student's personal background and aspirations
  5. Brief biographical sketch in a resume/CV format
  6. Official transcripts, sent directly to the Department of Oral Biology
  7. GRE General Test
  8. TOEFL - required for international students. The minimum TOEFL score required is 237 computer, 580 paper, iBT 70 (based only on listening, reading, and writing sections)

Degree Requirements

Minimum 70 credits, to include:

  1. Minimum 70 credit hours (including at least nine credits of thesis), of which at least 7 credits must be from science courses outside the Department of Oral Biology. Students who have adequate backgrounds in required courses may, on presentation of appropriate documentation, be excused from required courses; up to six hours of transfer credit may be granted at the discretion of the Graduate School.
  2. Required core courses: ORALB 569 (2), ORALB 575 (1-3, max. 10), ORALB 578 (2-4, max. 15), ORALB 579 (2), ORALB 581 (1-3, max. 3), ORALB 591 (1-2, max. 2), ORALB 592 (1-2, max. 2), ORALB 600, ORALB 700, DPHS 568 (3)
  3. Electives: 7 credits from science courses outside oral biology
  4. Recommended: One class on educational methods
  5. Thesis Research: A Research thesis is required. During the first year, each student is encouraged to spend time in several laboratories to gain familiarity with Research in progress and to help identify an area of special interest. Then, a preceptor and thesis advisory committee is appointed and the student begins thesis work. The final examination is concerned with the subject matter of the thesis and is conducted as an open seminar followed by examination by the advisory committee.
  6. Teaching: Students are encouraged to take elective courses offered through the Department of Medical Education and Graduate School.

Master of Science in Dentistry, Prosthodontics

Admission Requirements

  1. Professional degree from a dental school
  2. Complete electronic application to the Graduate School, including $65 application fee
  3. Complete the Questionnaire to Applicants for Postdoctoral Training (available for download at the School's website, www.dental.washington.edu)
  4. Class Standing form (available for download at the School's website, www.dental.washington.edu)
  5. Waiver form
  6. Three letters of recommendation or Evaluation of Applicant forms (available for download at the School's Website, www.dental.washington.edu
  7. A personal statement explaining why the student wishes to pursue an education in prosthodontics
  8. A CV or Resume
  9. Official transcripts, sent directly to the Department of Prosthodontics (all applicants must also send official transcripts to the Graduate School)
  10. GRE General Test (required only for applicants who graduated from a non-ADA-accredited dental school outside the US or Canada)
  11. TOEFL required for international students; the minimum TOEFL score required is 237 computer, 580 paper, iBT 70, (based only on listening, reading, and writing sections).

Degree Requirements

Minimum 108 credits, to include:

  1. Required Core Courses: PROS 560 (2), PROS 562 (2), PROS 563 (1), PROS 564 (1), PROS 572 (2), PROS 660 (minimum of 16), PROS 665 (1), RES D 570 (6), RES D 580 (6), RES D 585 (2), RES D 588 (2), RES D 589 (2), RES D 590 (6), RES D 600 (minimum of 14), RES D 660 (minimum of 24), DENT 565 (2), DPHS 568 (3), DPHS 569 (2), ORALM 570 (2), ORALM 580 (2), ORALB 574 (3), ORTHO 580 (2), ORTHO 582 (2), PERIO 561 (2), PERIO 580 (2), PERIO 582 (6), PERIO 585 (6), PERIO 586 (6)
  2. Non-thesis Research: A non-thesis Research study is required for the MSD. During the first year, each student is encouraged to gain familiarity with Research in progress and to help identify an area of special interest. After the student identifies an area of interest, a Research committee is established. The master's defense is concerned with the Research subject matter and is conducted as an open seminar followed by examination by the committee.
  3. Teaching: Second- and third-year students supervise predoctoral dental students working in the prosthodontics and restorative clinics.

Master of Science, Dental Hygiene

Admission Requirements

  1. Either a baccalaureate or a professional degree from a dental or medical school
  2. Completed application and application fee of $65
  3. Three letters of recommendation
  4. 200-300 word statement of educational and professional objectives which includes a general area of Research interest and academic goals. Optional - a personal statement that addresses the relationship between the student's personal background and aspirations
  5. Brief biographical sketch in a resume/CV format
  6. Official transcripts, sent directly to the Department of Oral Biology
  7. GRE General Test
  8. TOEFL - required for international students. The minimum TOEFL score required is 237 computer, 580 paper, iBT 70 (based only on listening, reading, and writing sections).

Degree Requirements

70 credits, to include:

  1. Coursework: 48 credits, as follows: CONJ 401 (4), CONJ 402 (4), CONJ 403 (4), PATH 544 (2-3, max. 5), PERIO 575 (2), ORALB 520 (3), ORALB 561 (3, max. 6), ORALB 572 (3, max. 6), ORALB 575 (1-3, max. 30); at least one of the following: PERIO 517 (2), DPHS 568 (3), DPHS 569 (2), or O S 532 (2); at least two of the following: MEBI 520 (2), MEBI 521 (3), GRDSCH 630 (2, max. 6). ORALB 562 (2, max 10), D HYG 595 (1-4, max. 12).
  2. Electives: 22 credits of electives. Recommended electives: ORALB 569 (2), ORALB 574 (3), ORALB 578 (2-4, max. 15), ORALB 579 (2), ORALB 600 (*), DENT 534 (1, max. 2), DPHS 550 (*, max. 6), DPHS 569 (2), ORTHO 580 (2), O S 520 (2), PHCOL 434 (2), PHCOL 435 (2), ORALM 520 (2)
  3. Clinical opportunities may be available in the DECOD (Dental Education in Care of Persons with Disabilities) and the Dental Fears Clinics.

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission Requirements

  1. Either a baccalaureate or a professional degree from a dental or medical school
  2. Completed application and application fee of $65
  3. Three letters of recommendation
  4. 200-300 word statement of educational and professional objectives which includes a general area of Research interest and academic goals. Optional - a personal statement that addresses the relationship between the student's personal background and aspirations
  5. Brief biographical sketch in a resume/CV format
  6. Official transcripts, sent directly to the Department of Oral Biology
  7. GRE General Test
  8. TOEFL - required for international students. The minimum TOEFL score required is 237 computer, 580 paper, iBT 70 (based only on listening, reading, and writing sections).

Degree Requirements

Minimum 90 credits, to include:

Through coursework, students are expected to gain proficiency in one or more basic biologic sciences and to master modern biological approaches in addition to gaining expertise in the subject area of oral and craniofacial sciences. At least 15 credit hours must come from science courses in departments other than oral biology. These include courses offered through the School of Medicine and courses selected to match the basic science interests of the student. Cross-disciplinary training in bioengineering is also available. All graduate students attend and participate in departmental seminars (ORALB 575).

  1. Required core courses: ORALB 569 (2), ORALB 575 (1-3, max. 30), ORALB 578 (2-4, max. 15), ORALB 579 (2), ORALB 581 (1-3, max. 3), ORALB 591 (1-2, max. 2), ORALB 592 (1-2, max. 2), ORALB 600, ORALB 800, DPHS 568 (3)
  2. At least 6 credits from the following School of Medicine courses: CONJ 524 through CONJ 558 (1.5) and PABIO 537 (3)
  3. Strongly recommended: at least one class on educational methods

Residency Training

Residency training programs are available in oral and maxillofacial surgery and the general practice of dentistry. Both programs provide for rotation through several of the University-affiliated hospitals. Each is a fully accredited program that grants a certificate upon successful completion of the training. Stipends are provided.

The oral and maxillofacial surgery program is four years in duration and provides broad exposure to all aspects of the practice of oral and maxillofacial surgery. Application, selection, and administration of this training program is provided through the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Applicants to the program must be graduates of an accredited U.S. or Canadian Dental School, demonstrate proficiency in the English language, submit National Dental Board Examination scores for Part 1, and register and participate in the Postdoctoral Dental Matching Program. Further information can be obtained by contacting the Residency Program Coordinator, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Box 357134, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-7134, (206) 543-7722.

The General Practice Residency (GPR) is a one-year training program with a second optional year that emphasizes the general dentist's role in a hospital setting and the management of medically, physically, and mentally compromised patients. It also provides multiple resources for enhancement of dental clinical skills in the dental setting, applying management techniques through minimal, moderate sedation and general anesthesia in the operating room. Applicants to the program must be graduates of an ADA-accredited dental school, submit National Dental Board Examination scores for Part 1, and register and participate in the Postdoctoral Application Support Service (PASS) and Postdoctoral Dental Matching Program (MATCH). Further information can be obtained by visiting the Website at dental.washington.edu/departments/gpr/general-practice-residency.html.

Postdoctoral Fellowships

Postdoctoral training fellowships are available in behavioral or public-health Research in dentistry in addition to those in oral biology. Programs vary in duration and many accommodate degree-seeking or Research fellows pursuing an academic career. NIH-sponsored partial tuition and a stipend for up to three years are provided for U.S. citizens, noncitizen nationals, and those foreign nationals with permanent-residency status in the United States. Members of ethnic minorities and women are especially invited to apply. Application, selection, and administration of the program are provided through the Departments of Dental Public Health Sciences and Oral Biology.

Graduate Training in Dental Public Health

Opportunities exist for pursuing graduate degrees in public health which emphasize applications to Research in dentistry. Master of Public Health (MPH) programs in the Departments of Epidemiology and Health Services of the School of Public Health can be pursued in conjunction with postdoctoral training in the School of Dentistry's Department of Dental Public Health Sciences. Didactic coursework is taken in the School of Public Health and Community Medicine, augmented with independent study and thesis Research on selected topics in the School of Dentistry. Similar opportunities exist for pursuing the PhD in epidemiology or biostatistics with an emphasis on Research in dentistry. Further information may be obtained from the Office of Academic Affairs, Box 357480, School of Dentistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-7480, (206) 221-6887.

The Office of Continuing Dental Education, School of Dentistry, offers programs and courses throughout the year to provide dentists, auxiliary personnel, and others involved in health care with current scientific knowledge and methodology of patient treatment. Utilizing local, national, and international experts, these programs provide a broad spectrum of information relevant to the needs of dental-health professionals. The instructional program consists of lectures, clinical courses, study clubs, extended clinical training, correspondence, and participation courses, some of which are offered in the simulated-patient laboratory. Various programs are presented throughout the year in the Pacific Northwest, Alaska, and Hawaii.

A list of courses offered may be obtained from the Office of Continuing Dental Education, Box 357137, University of Washington, School of Dentistry, Seattle, WA 98195-7137, (206) 543-5444, dental.washington.edu/cde/current-course-listings.html.

Professional Program

Doctor of Dental Surgery

The Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) curriculum provides students opportunities to learn the fundamental principles significant to the entire body of oral health. Students (approximately 63 per class) learn the basic health sciences, attain proficiency in clinical skills, develop an understanding of professional and ethical principles, and develop reasoning and critical decision-making skills that enable implementation of the dental knowledge base. The first year is divided among lecture, laboratory, and preclinical activities in basic sciences, dental anatomy, occlusion, and dental materials. There are also early clinical experiences in preventive dentistry and periodontics. In the second year, students develop additional preclinical skills, learn how basic science principles are applied to the clinical setting, and begin clinical patient treatment. In the third and fourth years, students primarily concentrate on providing clinical treatment and attend lectures that refine diagnostic and technical skills. Additionally, students are required to participate in elective clinical and didactic courses. Students choose elective courses offered by all departments, including opportunities in independent study, Research, seminars on various topics, and specialty clinical topics.

The DDS curriculum extends for 42 months or 14 quarters, including two summer quarters. Twelve of the academic year quarters are ten weeks of instruction and one week of examination, while the two required summer quarters following years two and three are each nine weeks long. If needed, students may be allowed additional time to complete required coursework beyond 42 months.

Admission

Requirements include all undergraduate courses listed below; Dental Admission Test; personal interview. The Admissions Committee encourages diversity in majors. Courses in the social sciences and the humanities are included in the committee evaluation. Dental experience, community service, and non-cognitive factors are given consideration as part of the whole file review.

The School of Dentistry is a state-supported institution and participates in the student exchange program provided by the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) which supports students from western states without dental schools. Although all applications are carefully reviewed, preference in admission is given to residents of Washington and WICHE states, followed by residents of other states.

Required courses: general chemistry - two quarters or one semester; organic chemistry - two quarters or one semester; general biochemistry - two quarters or one semester; general physics - three quarters or two semesters; general biology or zoology - three quarters or two semesters; general microbiology - two quarters or one semester. Recommended: medical microbiology.

Transfer Applicants: The school rarely, and only under exceptional circumstances, admits transfer students from other dental schools.

Foreign Applicants: The school does not provide a special program for foreign-trained dentists.

Health Sciences Minority Student Programs: To increase diversity of students, the school participates in the Health Sciences Minority Student Program. In addition to advising and career counseling, this office works with Health Sciences schools to provide student development and support programs, networking opportunities, and summer Research programs. The HSMSP office activities include participation on several health sciences and campus-wide committees for purposes of collaborating and exchanging strategies on effective methods for recruiting and retaining a diverse student body, as well as promoting and celebrating diversity.

Regional Initiatives in Dental Education (RIDE) is a strategic expansion of the University of Washington School of Dentistry in conjunction with Eastern Washington University, designed to help meet the oral health needs of rural and underserved communities in the Northwest. RIDE creates regional training sites in areas lacking dental schools by partnering with regional universities, dentists and dental associations, community health centers, and others. Student admission to the RIDE program in Spokane is limited to residents of Washington state.

The School belongs to the American Association of Dental Schools Application Service (AADSAS). November 1 of the year prior to matriculation is the AADSAS priority filing deadline. Only applications received in the AADSAS Washington, D.C. office by the priority filing date are forwarded to the UW for consideration by the Admissions Committee. There are no exceptions. AADSAS applications are available online at www.adea.org. The UW Dental School's DAT deadline is October 31 of the year prior to matriculation. Information regarding the Dental Admission Test may be found at www.ada.org.

For information on admission to the UW School of Dentistry, contact the Office of Student Life and Admissions, School of Dentistry, University of Washington, Box 356365, Seattle, WA 98195-6365, (206) 543-5840, askuwsod@uw.edu, or www.dental.washington.edu (click on the "prospective student" link). University of Washington undergraduates may contact the Predental Advising Office, University of Washington, 141 Mary Gates Hall, Box 353760, Seattle, WA 98195-3760.

Once the AADSAS application has been received, a preliminary screening determines if an applicant meets the Admissions Committee's criteria to receive a supplemental application and request for the following materials:

  1. A supplementary application which includes a short personal statement
  2. A non-refundable application fee of $35
  3. Three letters of recommendation are required: one from a science instructor who can evaluate the applicant's academic and intellectual qualifications, a second from a dentist who is familiar with the applicant's knowledge of and motivation toward the dental profession, and a character reference from someone who can indicate the applicant's contribution to the community, etc.
  4. If a predental committee exists on the applicant's campus, a combined recommendation from that committee may be used to replace all three recommendations. The School of Dentistry accepts letters of recommendation processed by AADSAS, or directly from recommenders.
  5. Dental Admission Test scores. Test must be taken by October 31 of the year prior to entry.
  6. Transcripts from all higher education institutions attended
  7. A list of current and future courses
  8. Acknowledgment of having read, understood, and being able to meet, with or without reasonable accommodation, the Essential Requirements of Dental Education at the University of Washington School of Dentistry (to be sent with the supplemental application form)
  9. Conviction/criminal history information. Washington state law requires that all faculty, students, and staff disclose background information concerning crimes and offenses against vulnerable populations. A complete copy of the law is available from the School's Office of Student Life and Admissions and is forwarded upon request. Applications are not considered until completed disclosure forms have been returned to student admissions.

The application is considered complete once all materials noted above (1-9) are returned. Upon receipt of the completed application, invitations for an interview are sent to applicants based on an additional screening of the whole file. The interview is an opportunity for an open, friendly discussion of the applicant's interests, background, and reasons for selecting dentistry as a profession. During the interview day, applicants have numerous opportunities to learn about UW programs, faculty, and student life. In addition to the interview, the School provides the applicant with financial aid and cost information. During the lunch hour, applicants meet with enrolled students and tour the School. Applicants also meet with the deans to learn about programs, Research, and cultural opportunities.

The admissions committee, composed of faculty and community dentists, determines admission status after considering the following:

  1. Grades. Overall GPA and GPA in required predental science courses. Committee members look for a strong, consistent GPA without withdrawals, incompletes, repeated courses, or non-graded options. Grade trends are reviewed.
  2. DAT (Dental Admission Test). The test, sponsored by the American Dental Association, covers several areas: reading comprehension, quantitative reasoning, survey of natural sciences (including biology, general, and organic chemistry), and perceptual ability (including form development, apertures, angles, cubes, and orthographic projections). At the UW, scores are reviewed to identify an applicant's areas of strength. The test must be taken no later than October 31, one year prior to admission.
  3. Level of Pre-professional Education. The majority of applicants have completed a baccalaureate degree by the time of entry. Consideration is given to applicants who have not or do not expect to complete a baccalaureate degree, but who have completed all predental requirements, have a highly competitive academic record, and a minimum of three years' full-time coursework.
  4. Dental Knowledge. Includes knowledge of the field of dentistry through volunteer experience in a dental setting (dentist's office, clinic, etc.), introductory dental coursework, and exploration of the dental literature. A qualified applicant has a clear understanding of the profession, a demonstrated interest in the field, and a minimum of 100 volunteer hours in a dental setting.
  5. Contribution to Diversity.
  6. Unique Life Experiences. Among other things, Research and teaching efforts, travel, and work experience are some of the life experiences considered.
  7. Personal Attributes. In addition to motivation, the applicant's poise and communication skills are examined. Personal attributes such as integrity, responsibility, leadership, initiative, community service, perseverance, and diversity of interests are important.
  8. Demonstrated Community Service.

Interviews begin in October and typically end in February. The American Dental Association Traffic Rules allow dental schools to begin making offers of acceptance on December 1. The School uses a "rolling admission" format, so interviews and committee decisions continue to be made between December and March.

The Admissions Committee makes one of three decisions:

  1. Offer of Acceptance. Admission application has been accepted. The applicant has a specified time to reply to reserve enrollment in the entering first-year class. In addition, enrollment is contingent on timely submission of the following: registration deposit, transcripts showing completion of all required predental courses, registration for autumn quarter of the upcoming academic year, and completion of required immunizations.
  2. Alternate Status. Applicant is offered a position on the alternate list. The applicant has a specified time to reserve a position on this list, maintained until the beginning of the school year.
  3. Denial of Admission. The Committee has considered the application but cannot offer a position or alternate status.

Accepted applicants receive follow-up information about registration procedures, financial aid, and the orientation program throughout the spring and summer. Attendance at orientation is mandatory and provides an opportunity for newly enrolled students to learn about the upcoming curriculum, student rights and responsibilities, financial aid information, student organizations, challenge examinations, and the start of academic coursework. Orientation begins in late August. New students attend an off-campus student retreat to interact with peer advisers and meet classmates in an informal setting.

Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE): The school participates in a program administered by WICHE for students who reside in western states not served by a dental school (Alaska, Arizona, Hawaii, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, and Wyoming). Such students should seek requests for certification and information about benefits of the program from the WICHE commission office in their state of residence.

Projected costs can be found at dental.washington.edu/prospective-students/projected-costs.html.

Information on loans and scholarships may be obtained from the Director of Financial Aid, D323 Health Sciences, Box 356365. Information relating to student life, including the Academic Regulations Manual and Professional Ethics Code may be obtained from the Associate Dean for Student Life and Admissions, D323 Health Sciences, Box 356365.

Degree Requirements

285-333 credits minimum, as follows:

  1. Year 1 (71 credits, plus electives): B STR 431, B STR 530, B STR 541; DENT 610; DPHS 510; ORALB 510 (3, 3), ORALB 520; ORALB 521; ORALM 513, ORALM 514, ORALM 515; ORALM 516, ORALM 517; P BIO 505; P BIO 506 (4, 4); PATH 544 (3, 2); PERIO 517; RES D 510 (1, 2), RES D 511, RES D 515, RES D 516, RES D 517, RES D 519
  2. Year 2 (86 credits, plus electives): DENT 520; DENT 521, DENT 522; DENT 523; ENDO 521; O S 520; ORALM 520 (2, 2, 2), ORALM 525, ORALM 526, ORALM 527, ORALM 528, ORALM 529; ORTHO 520, ORTHO 521, ORTHO 522; PEDO 520, PEDO 525; PERIO 525, PERIO 526 (2, 2); PERIO 620; PHCOL 434, PHCOL 435; PROS 520, PROS 523, PROS 525; RES D 520, RES D 521, RES D 522 (3, 3, 3); RES D 525, RES D 526, RES D 527 (3, 3, 3); RES D 620
  3. Year 3 (74 credits, plus electives): DENT 533, DENT 534 (1, 1), DENT 537, DENT 543; DENT 551, DENT 552, DENT 553, DENT 554 (1, 1, 1, 1); DPHS 535, ENDO 534, ENDO 535, ENDO 630 (1, 1, 1, 1); O S 530 (1, 1, 1), O S 532, O S 630 (2, 2); ORALM 531, ORALM 532, ORALM 533 (1, 1, 2); ORALM 630 (1, 1, 1, 2); ORTHO 630; ORTHO 631; PEDO 630 (1, 1, 1, 1); PERIO 530, PERIO 531 (2, 2); PERIO 630, PERIO 631, PERIO 632 (1, 1, 1); PERIO 639; PROS 630 (1, 1, 1, 2); RES D 530, RES D 531, RES D 532 (2, 2, 2); RES D 535, RES D 630 (2, 3, 3), RES D 635
  4. Year 4 (55 credits, plus electives):DENT 547, DENT 548, DENT 549 (2, 2, 2); DENT 555, DENT 556, DENT 557 (1, 1, 1); DENT 640, DENT 645; DPHS 541, DPHS 640; ENDO 630 (1, 1, 1); O S 630; ORALB 540; ORALM 540 (2, 2), ORALM 545 (1, 1), ORALM 640 (1, 1, 1); PEDO 630 (1, 1, 1); PERIO 540; PERIO 640, PERIO 641, PERIO 642 (1, 1, 1); PROS 640 (1, 1, 1); RES D 540, RES D 541, RES D 542, RES D 640 (3, 3, 3)
  5. Electives: A minimum of two elective courses must be taken during the course of the program. Elective credits may not exceed a total of 50 credits.

Facilities

School clinics, teaching laboratories, and lecture halls are up-to-date, well maintained, and periodically renovated. Clinical modules are assigned to students for use in patient treatment. The D-1 Simulation Clinic is a state-of-the-art teaching facility used for preclinical and laboratory courses.

School Accreditation and Licensure

The school is fully accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation, the recognized accrediting body for dentistry and the related dental fields. For information, write to the Commission on Dental Accreditation, 211 East Chicago Ave., Chicago, IL 60611-2678. Admission to the practice of dentistry in any state is conditional upon meeting the requirements of the individual state dental licensure requirement. In order to practice in the State of Washington, the candidate for licensure must have a dental degree from a U.S. or Canadian dental school, and have successfully completed the American Dental Association National Board Examinations and the Western Regional Examining Board Examination. Additional information about licensure requirements should be requested from the Washington State Department of Health, Dental Quality Assurance Commission, PO Box 1099, Olympia WA 98504-1099, (360) 586-6898.

Health Care and Immunization Policy

Enrolled students at the UW School of Dentistry are eligible for healthcare services provided by the Hall Health Primary Care Center. In addition, the University has arranged for an Accident and Sickness Insurance Plan specifically designed for students, their dependents, and their domestic partners for which the Hall Health Primary Care Center is the preferred provider. The UW Health Sciences Center requires that its students, staff, and faculty show documentation of protection against a number of vaccine-preventable diseases. Additional information is available via the Hall Health Primary Care Center website at depts.washington.edu/hhpccweb/