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Economics

Department Overview

305 Savery

Economics studies the institutions and arrangements that societies use to create and allocate productive resources and advances our understanding of the choices and behaviors of individuals, households, firms, and other organizations. Its deep intellectual roots, rigorous analytical methods, and powerful ability to explain social phenomena warrant the importance of economics within the social sciences.

Undergraduate Program

Advisers
305 Savery, Box 353330
(206) 543-5794
econadv@uw.edu

The Department of Economics offers the following programs of study:

  • The Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in economics
  • The Bachelor of Science degree with a major in economics

The Bachelor of Arts degree is designed to provide a general background in economics, and is the choice of most departmental majors.

The Bachelor of Science degree requires more mathematics for admission, and its graduation requirements have a more pronounced quantitative emphasis.

Applied fields of study available include money and banking, industrial organization, environmental and natural resource economics, labor economics, public finance, comparative systems and development, international trade, and econometrics.

Bachelor of Arts

Suggested First- and Second-Year College Courses: ECON 200, ECON 201; and MATH 120, MATH 124 or MATH 111, MATH 112. Courses that develop strong analytical and quantitative-reasoning skills.

Department Admission Requirements

  1. Minimum 45 quarter credits, including ECON 200, ECON 201; STAT 311; one of the following: MATH 112, MATH 124, MATH 134, or MATH 145; and 5 credits of English composition
  2. Minimum 2.50 cumulative GPA for all prior college work; minimum 2.50 GPA for all UW coursework, when applicable.
  3. Minimum 2.50 cumulative GPA for the following four courses: ECON 200, ECON 201; STAT 311; one of the following: MATH 112, MATH 124, MATH 134, or MATH 145, with a minimum 2.0 grade for each of these courses and for English composition.
  4. A one-page personal statement, typed and double-spaced, responding to the following questions: What are your personal/educational goals, and how do you expect those to be met through an economics major? What background do you bring to the program? Describe any special experiences that would contribute to your studies in the field.
  5. Completion of reading comprehension, critical thinking, and writing assessment essay. See department website for details.
  6. Application deadline is the second Friday of each quarter (autumn, winter, spring). Admission is competitive. Meeting above criteria does not guarantee admission to the major.

Major Requirements

60 credits

  1. Admission to the major
  2. STAT 311 (or equivalent) and MATH 112 or MATH 124 (or equivalent)
  3. ECON 200 and ECON 201; minimum 2.0 grade
  4. ECON 300 and ECON 301; minimum 2.0 grade
  5. ECON 382
  6. Five ECON courses (25 credits) at the 400 level (not including ECON 496, ECON 497, ECON 499
  7. Minimum 50 credits in ECON-prefix courses; minimum 2.00 GPA for these 50 credits
  8. ECON 300, ECON 301, and ECON 382 taken in residence as a matriculated student through the UW, Seattle
  9. Maximum 10 credits at the 400 level taken out of residence at the UW
  10. Maximum 10 credits at the 400 level taken out of residence at the UW

Bachelor of Science

Suggested First- and Second-Year College Courses: ECON 200, ECON 201, and MATH 120, MATH 124 and STAT 311. Additional calculus preparation during the first year is strongly recommended as MATH 125 and MATH 126 are required for admission. Courses that develop strong analytical and quantitative-reasoning skills.

Department Admission Requirements

  1. Minimum 45 quarter credits completed, including ECON 200, ECON 201; STAT 311, STAT 341, or STAT 390; MATH 124, MATH 125, and MATH 126 (or MATH 134, MATH 135, MATH 136); and 5 credits of English composition
  2. Minimum 2.50 cumulative GPA for all prior college work; minimum 2.50 GPA for all UW coursework, when applicable.
  3. Minimum 2.50 cumulative GPA for four of the seven courses required for entrance - ECON 200, ECON 201; STAT 311, STAT 341, or STAT 390; calculus at the level of MATH 124, or first calculus course taken, with a minimum 2.0 grade for each of the seven courses required for entrance.
  4. A one-page personal statement, typed and double-spaced, responding to the following questions: What are your personal/educational goals, and how do you expect those to be met through an economics major? What background do you bring to the program? Describe any special experience that would contribute to your studies in the field.
  5. Completion of reading comprehension, critical thinking, and writing assessment essay (RTW). See department website for details.
  6. Application deadline is the second Friday of each quarter (autumn, winter, spring). Admission is competitive. Meeting the above criteria does not guarantee admission to the major.

Major Requirements

70 credits

  1. Admission to the major
  2. STAT 311 (or equivalent) and MATH 124, MATH 125, MATH 126 (or equivalent)
  3. ECON 200 and ECON 201, minimum 2.0 grade
  4. ECON 300 and ECON 301, minimum 2.0 grade
  5. Six ECON courses (30 credits) at the 400 level (not including ECON 496, ECON 497, ECON 499). Of these, minimum 15 credits of the following theory and methods courses: ECON 400 or ECON 401, ECON 405, ECON 424, ECON 482, ECON 483, ECON 484, ECON 485, ECON 486, ECON 487. Of these, 5 credits chosen from either ECON 400 or ECON 401; and another 5 credits from either ECON 424, or ECON 482, or ECON 483; 15 additional credits at the 400 level.
  6. Minimum 50 credits in ECON-prefix courses; minimum 2.00 GPA in these 50 credits
  7. ECON 300 and ECON 301 taken in residence as a matriculated student through the UW, Seattle
  8. Maximum 10 credits at the 400 level taken out of residence at the UW, Seattle

Continuation Policy

All students must make satisfactory academic progress in the major. Failure to do so results in probation, which can lead to dismissal from the major. For the complete continuation policy, contact the departmental adviser or refer to the department website.

Student Outcomes and Opportunities

  • Learning Objectives and Expected Outcomes: For undergraduates, the role of the Department of Economics is to train students in a rigorous, analytical discipline that advances their problem-solving abilities and their understanding of important public issues.

    The Bachelor of Arts program provides the flexibility and social science training to prepare students for employment in a variety of areas. Also, it is excellent preparation for many master's-level graduate programs in other disciplines and for professional schools such as law, business, and medicine.

    The Bachelor of Science program is designed to provide undergraduates a rigorous background in economic analysis. This degree is designed for students who plan to do graduate study in economics or who plan to enter certain technically oriented professions, such as actuarial science, demography, financial analysis, or environmental consulting.

  • Honors Options Available: College Honors (Completion of both Interdisciplinary Honors and Departmental Honors requirements). Departmental Honors. See adviser for requirements.
  • Internships, Research, and Service Learning: Course credit available for internships and research. Visit www.econ.washington.edu/instruction/undergrad/beyond.html.
  • Department Scholarships: Scholarship opportunities are available for application during spring quarter. See departmental advisers for details. Note: Students must have filed a FAFSA with the University of Washington's Financial Aid Office to be eligible.
  • Study Abroad Opportunities: The department offers a variety of exchange programs. For more information, visit www.washington.edu/instruction/undergrad/studyabroad.htm.
  • Student Organizations/Associations: The Economics Undergraduate Board (EUB) serves as a liaison between economics students, faculty, and alumni, and also provides services to the general economics undergraduate student body. The EUB provides free tutoring for ECON 200, ECON 201, ECON 300, and ECON 301; holds career seminars and faculty lectures; and publishes the quarterly newsletter, "The Economizer." For more information on these services, as well as others provided by the EUB, visit depts.washington.edu/ecnboard/.

Of Special Note:

  • Courses accepted in transfer as ECON 1XX or ECON 2XX cannot be applied to major requirements unless courses equivalent to ECON 200 and ECON 201 were required as prerequisites. ECON X courses not having these prerequisites may be applied to electives for the degree, but not to the 50-credit economics-course requirement.
  • Internship and independent study economics credits do not count toward the required economics credits for the BA or BS degree.

Graduate Program

Graduate Program Coordinator
306 Savery, Box 353330
(206) 685-1384
econadv@uw.edu

The department offers the doctor of philosophy degree. The program is designed to develop trained economists for careers in teaching, private industry, government, and international agencies. Frequent seminars led by U.S. and foreign visitors as well as by faculty and students are conducted as an integral element of the department's graduate program.

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission Requirements

  1. Intermediate-level microeconomic and macroeconomic theory.
  2. One year of calculus, one term of linear algebra, and one term of statistics.
  3. Strongly recommended: differential equations, additional work in calculus, matrix algebra, and probability and statistics.
  4. An undergraduate major in economics is not required provided the above prerequisites have been met.
  5. General Test of the GRE.
  6. International applicants (except those noted below) must submit a valid score from one of the following tests to demonstrate spoken English proficiency. Scores noted meet the UW language requirement for international teaching assistants: 26 on the speaking portion of the TOEFLiBT, or 7.0 on the speaking portion of the IELTS, or 70 on the Versant English Test. Applicants who achieve one of these scores are given priority for departmental funding, although students who achieve slightly lower scores may also be considered.

    The following international applicants are not required to take a language test to demonstrate spoken English proficiency: (1) Those who have completed, or will complete before starting the graduate program, a bachelor's degree at a regionally accredited U.S. institution. (This exemption does not apply to applicants who have completed, or will complete, only a master's degree at a U.S. institution.) (2) Those who are native English speakers.

  7. The department does not accept admission to a terminal master's (MA) degree. A sequential MA degree is offered for students already enrolled in the PhD program.

Degree Requirements

Minimum 90 credits

  1. ECON 500, ECON 501, ECON 502, ECON 503, ECON 508, ECON 509, ECON 580, ECON 581, and ECON 582.
  2. Core examinations in microeconomics and macroeconomics.
  3. Eight other elective field courses in economics at the graduate level, including two fields of specialization. Fields of specialization include advanced macroeconomic theory, advanced microeconomic theory, comparative systems and development, econometrics, finance, health economics, industrial organization, international economics, labor economics, natural resource economics, and public finance
  4. General examination
  5. Doctoral dissertation

Financial Aid

The principal form is a teaching assistantship. Assistantships are available to entering graduate students with promising academic records. A small number of fellowships are also available.

Research and Computing Resources

The department houses a computer laboratory that provides hardware and software for economic modeling, economic estimation, word processing, and other faculty and graduate student research functions. Access is restricted to economics graduate students and faculty. In addition, the Center for Social Science Computation and Research (CSSCR) maintains an extensive library of computer software and data, and offers free consulting services to aid faculty and students with computing problems.