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College of Education

College Overview

Dean
Patricia Wasley
222 Miller

Associate Deans
Tom Stritikus
Deborah E. McCutchen

The College of Education is primarily a graduate and professional school dedicated to equity and excellence in education through the preparation and on-going renewal of education professionals, the promotion of social justice, the advancement of knowledge through research, and the connection of research to inform policy and improve practice. The College has four broad curricular areas: Curriculum and Instruction, Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, Educational Psychology, and Special Education. Degrees conferred are MEd, PhD, EdD, and MIT. Certificates can be earned in teaching (elementary, secondary, and special education), school administration (principals, program administrators, and superintendents), and school psychology. In addition, the College offers a BA in Early Childhood and Family Studies. In collaboration with the College of Arts and Sciences, the College offers a minor in Education, Learning, and Society.

The College of Education at the University of Washington believes that an effective public education system for a diverse citizenry is the cornerstone of a democratic society. To that end, the College dedicates its resources to helping make an excellent education an everyday reality for every student in every community across the state and country. As part of a major university located in a metropolitan area, the College is able to work in collaboration with a number of school districts in the area to provide teaching, research, and field experiences for its students.

Special Offices and Services

The College of Education maintains a number of specialized offices to assist in the fulfillment of its goals. Among these are the Office of Teacher Education, the Office of Student Services, and the Office of Minority Recruitment and Retention. In addition, the College of Education maintains formal relationships with a number of school districts in the area to provide research and field experience opportunities for students in the various programs. Individuals interested in teacher certification or in graduate degree programs may visit the College's website, education.washington.edu or e-mail edinfo@uw.edu.

Undergraduate Program

Adviser
206 Miller Hall
(206) 616-6211
ecfsinfo@uw.edu

The College of Education offers the following programs of study:

  • The Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in early childhood and family studies

Bachelor of Arts

Suggested First- and Second-Year Coursework: A course in biological sciences (BIOL 100, BIOL 104, or similar); a course in biological bases of development (BIOL 118, B STR 301, PSYCH 202, or similar); a college level mathematics or statistics course, EDUC 170, EDPSY 490, or EDPSY 491; ECFS 200 recommended, but not required.

Department Admission Requirements

  1. Satisfactory progress toward completion of general education requirements
  2. Admission is competitive, based on the following criteria. Completion of requirements does not guarantee admission.
    1. Two-to-three page personal statement reflecting an interest in the early childhood and family studies major and a commitment to learning about the field
    2. Overall academic performance reflected in copies of unofficial transcripts.
    3. Other evidence of interest in and commitment to the field (e.g., work experience, volunteer experience, or internships)
    4. Grades in any completed recommended courses and courses applied to major requirements
  3. Applications are due April 15 for autumn quarter start. Applications may be considered after that date on a case-by-case basis, depending on program capacity.

Students accepted into the major typically have a minimum cumulative 2.50 GPA and a minimum grade of 2.0 for any prior college coursework that can be applied toward the major.

Information Sessions: Prospective students are encouraged to attend an ECFS information session to learn more about the major and how to apply. For a schedule of information sessions, visit the Early Childhood and Family Studies website at education.washington.edu/degrees/undergrad/ecfs/FAQ.html.

For further information on requirements/procedures, see education.washington.edu/degrees/undergrad/ecfs/, or inquire at 206 Miller.

General Education Requirements

See College of Arts and Sciences requirements. A maximum of 15 credits in ECFS-prefix courses from the University Areas of Knowledge list may be counted toward the UW Areas of Knowledge requirements. The following courses must be taken as part of general education requirements, either prior to or after admission to the program.

  1. Biology Science and Development (7-10 credits): See website for complete list of acceptable courses.
  2. Mathematics/Statistics (5 credits): Any college-level mathematics or statistics course, EDUC 170, EDPSY 490, or EDPSY 491.

Major Requirements

84 credits, to include the following:

  1. Early Childhood and Family Studies Core Courses (28 credits): ECFS 301, ECFS 302, ECFS 400, ECFS 401, ECFS 402, EDPSY 402
  2. General Development (18 credits): EDUC 305 or EDUC 310; EDPSY 304, EDSPE 404, and EDSPE 419
  3. Service Learning and Research Experiences (18 credits): ECFS 303, ECFS 304, ECFS 305, ECFS 454, ECFS 455, ECFS 456
  4. Electives (minimum 20 credits): Minimum one course each from theoretical foundations of early childhood development, methodology, and social policy and organization. See website for current list of electives.
  5. Minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA in courses used to satisfy program requirements
  6. Senior Project: Students identify interest areas, develop research skills, and prepare for future pursuits. Provides evidence that students have the ability to finish similar projects in work or graduate school. Students develop communication skills necessary for sharing knowledge and ideas with others. Presentation required.

Bachelor of Arts (Online Option)

Suggested First- and Second-Year Coursework: A course in biological sciences (BIOL 100, BIOL 104, or similar); a course in biological bases of development (BIOL 118, B STR 301, PSYCH 202, or similar); a college-level mathematics or statistics course, EDUC 170, EDPSY 490, or EDPSY 491; ECFS 200 recommended, but not required

Department Admission Requirements

  1. Satisfactory progress toward completion of general education requirements
  2. Admission is competitive, based on the following criteria. Completion of requirements does not guarantee admission.
    1. Two-to-three page personal statement reflecting an interest in the early childhood and family studies major and a commitment to learning about the field
    2. Overall academic performance reflected in copies of unofficial transcripts.
    3. Other evidence of interest in and commitment to the field (e.g., work experience, volunteer experience, or internships)
    4. Grades in any completed recommended courses and courses applied to major requirements
    5. Completion of an academic associate degree with at least 70 transferable credits to apply to University’s general education requirements.
    6. A course in biological sciences (BIOL 100, BIOL 104, or similar); a course in biological bases of development (BIOL 118, B STR 301, PSYCH 202, or similar); a college-level mathematics or statistics course, EDUC 170, EDPSY 490, or EDPSY 491; ECFS 200 recommended, but not required
  3. Applications are due May 15 for autumn quarter start. Applications may be considered after that date on a case-by-case basis, depending on program capacity.
  4. This is a limited admission program. Students admitted to the ECFS online program are not allowed to transfer to another onsite or online major/degree program or complete a minor without reapplying to the UW through the normal admission review process.

Students accepted into the major typically have a minimum cumulative 2.50 GPA and a minimum grade of 2.0 for any prior college coursework that can be applied toward the major.

Information Sessions: Prospective students are encouraged to attend an ECFS information session to learn more about the major and how to apply. For a schedule of information sessions, visit the Early Childhood and Family Studies website at education.washington.edu/degrees/undergrad/ecfs/FAQ.html.

For further information on requirements/procedures, see education.washington.edu/degrees/undergrad/ecfs/, or inquire at 206 Miller.

General Education Requirements

See College of Arts and Sciences requirements. A maximum of 15 credits in ECFS-prefix courses from the University Areas of Knowledge list may be counted toward the UW Areas of Knowledge requirements. The following courses must be taken as part of general education requirements, prior to admission to the program.

  1. Biology Science and Development (7-10 credits): See website for complete list of acceptable courses.
  2. Mathematics/Statistics (5 credits): Any college-level mathematics or statistics course, EDUC 170, EDPSY 490, or EDPSY 491.

Major Requirements

84 credits, to include the following:

  1. Early Childhood and Family Studies Core Courses (28 credits): ECFS 301, ECFS 302, ECFS 400, ECFS 401, ECFS 402, EDPSY 402
  2. General Development (18 credits): EDUC 305 or EDUC 310; EDPSY 304, EDSPE 404, and EDSPE 419
  3. Service Learning and Research Experiences (18 credits): ECFS 303, ECFS 304, ECFS 305, ECFS 454, ECFS 455, ECFS 456
  4. Electives (minimum 20 credits): Minimum one course each from theoretical foundations of early childhood development, methodology, and social policy and organization. See website for current list of electives.
  5. Minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA in courses used to satisfy program requirements
  6. Senior Project: Students identify interest areas, develop research skills, and prepare for future pursuits. Provides evidence that students have the ability to finish similar projects in work or graduate school. Students develop communication skills necessary for sharing knowledge and ideas with others. Presentation required.
  7. Minimum 64 credits of coursework applied to the major taken from the UW Seattle campus.

Student Outcomes and Opportunities

  • Learning Objectives: The early childhood and family studies major immerses students in the study of child and family development and education. Students learn about child development, early learning, and family studies from a variety of perspectives. They receive a strong grounding in reading and understanding the theory and evidence that provide the foundation for the field and drive current research and policy efforts.
  • Expected Outcomes: Students apply their knowledge and skill as they work alongside community-based teachers, community leaders, and care providers. The degree provides excellent preparation for a wide variety of careers in early learning, childcare, parent and family support and education, child and community advocacy and organization, and social/mental health services. It also serves as a pathway for graduate studies in education, child and family studies, educational policy, special education, and other areas. This interdisciplinary major is offered at the sophomore, junior, and senior level.
  • Service Learning and Research: Two sequences of field-based experiences provide students with real life-learning opportunities in community-based early childhood or family support/education settings. Students participate in both an introductory seminar experience as well as a sequenced field experience during their first year in service learning. During the second phase, students participate in a three-quarter senior service learning, research, and senior project that provides advanced opportunities to integrate theory and practice in community-based early childhood or family support programs, and/or research settings. The seminar ties together research and practice, demonstrating how research informs evidence-based decision-making in programs and services. Students also receive guidance in career options and current events in the field, tying in major experiences with their own developmental and career goals. Learning objectives are outlined in class.
  • Honors Options Available: With College Honors (Completion of Honors Core Curriculum and Departmental Honors); With Honors (Completion of Departmental Honors requirements in the major). See adviser for requirements.
  • Department Scholarships: See departmental website for undergraduate scholarship information.
  • Student Organizations/Associations: Associated Students of the College of Education (ASCE) and Educators for Social Justice (ESJ).

Graduate Degree Programs

Graduate Program Coordinator
206 Miller, Box 353600
(206) 543-7833
edinfo@uw.edu

The College of Education currently offers four advanced degrees: Master in Teaching, Master of Education, Doctor of Education, and Doctor of Philosophy. The MIT degree is awarded to elementary and secondary certification students at the completion of their program. Graduate students working toward other degrees may specialize their degree studies in curriculum and instruction, educational psychology (including cognitive studies), educational leadership and policy studies, or special education. A focus on higher education leadership and policy leading to Master of Education or Doctor of Education degrees is offered through Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. Questions regarding graduate study in education should be directed via email to edinfo@uw.edu, or visit the College's website at http://depts.washington.edu/coe/.

Master in Teaching

The Master in Teaching (MIT) degree program results in a Washington residency teaching certificate for elementary or secondary (specific subjects) school teaching. The program is an integrated sequence of full-time, daytime coursework and field experiences spanning five quarters Field experiences are in partner schools in the Seattle/Puget Sound area chosen to provide experience working with children from racially and culturally diverse communities.

Admission Requirements

  1. A baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution with at least a 3.00 GPA for the last 90 quarter (60 semester) credits
  2. Goal statement
  3. 60 or more hours in a classroom that most closely matches the subject and age level the applicant wishes to teach. A supervisor completes the Evaluation of Educational Experience form.
  4. Two letters of recommendation from faculty or professional references
  5. Passing scores from all three sections of the West-B exam, sent to UW
  6. Passing score of the Praxis II exam in applicant's specific content area. Refer to web or brochure for specific information.
  7. Official transcripts from all community colleges and universities attended.
  8. Secondary applicants must contact the appropriate department adviser to have coursework evaluated using the Endorsement Evaluation form. Refer to the endorsement sheet in the MIT packet for department information and locations. Social studies applicants may drop off unofficial transcripts and course descriptions to 206 Miller for evaluation.
  9. Elementary applicants must have coursework evaluated by a Program Design Specialist in 206 Miller. This is done by submitting transcripts (and course descriptions from schools other than UW) along with the prerequisite evaluation form to 206 Miller. The evaluation is completed within two weeks and mailed to the applicant.

Degree Requirements

60-101 credits, to include:

  1. Elementary Education Focus
    1. Courses: EDC&I 324; EDC&I 494; EDC&I 586; EDLPS 496; EDSPE 526; EDTEP 501, EDTEP 502, EDTEP 503; EDTEP 505; EDTEP 511; EDTEP 521, EDTEP 522; EDTEP 523; EDTEP 531, EDTEP 532, EDTEP 533; EDTEP 541; EDTEP 542; EDTEP 543; EDTEP 551; EDTEP 552; EDTEP 601; UCONJ 510.
    2. Note: The current Washington state endorsement for elementary teachers is "elementary education." Graduates of this program may be hired to teach specific or multiple subjects in middle or junior high school through grade 8. Those interested in teaching in the middle schools are encouraged to discuss this option with advisers in the Office of Student Services.
  2. Elementary Special Education Focus: EDC&I 324; EDC&I 494; EDC&I 586; EDLPS 496; EDSPE 404; EDSPE 414; EDSPE 496; EDSPE 496; EDSPE 500; EDSPE 513; EDSPE 514; EDSPE 526; EDSPE 545; EDSPE 601; EDTEP 501, EDTEP 502, EDTEP 503; EDTEP 505; EDTEP 511; EDTEP 521, EDTEP 522; EDTEP 523; EDTEP 531, EDTEP 532, EDTEP 533; EDTEP 541; EDTEP 542; EDTEP 543; EDTEP 551; EDTEP 552; EDTEP 601; UCONJ 510.
  3. Secondary Education Focus: EDC&I 494; EDC&I 586; EDTEP 551; EDTEP 561; EDTEP 562, EDTEP 563; EDTEP 564; EDTEP 565; EDTEP 571; EDTEP 573; either EDTEP 580, EDTEP 582, EDTEP 584, EDTEP 586, or EDTEP 588; either EDTEP 581, EDTEP 583, EDTEP 585, EDTEP 587, EDTEP 589; EDTEP 591; EDTEP 592; EDTEP 593; EDTEP 595; EDTEP 601; elective outside Education

Master of Education

The Master of Education (MEd) degree requires a minimum of 45 credits, including at least 15 credits in a specialized area of study in education; 9 credits related to, but outside the area of specialization, some coursework outside education; 9 thesis credits or, for the non-thesis option, 9 credits in a field study or other approved project; and a final examination.

Admission Requirements

  1. A baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution with at least a 3.00 GPA for the last 90-quarter (60 semester) credits
  2. GRE Scores
  3. Goal statement
  4. Prerequisites stipulated by the area of specialization within the College

Degree Requirements, Curriculum and Instruction Pathway

45 credits, to include:

  1. Common Area Requirements
    1. Foundations of Education (9 credits): Students gain an understanding of the complex issues that influence teaching and learning. Students work with advisers to select from courses such as: history of education, education as a moral endeavor, human learning, curriculum design, special topics in curriculum and instruction.
    2. Thesis, Non-thesis, or Project Option (9 credits): The non-thesis option may be satisfied by a 9-credit culminating project or 9 credits at the 500 level or above related to the student's teaching and research interests.
    3. Colloquium Presentation: At the end of the program, students present their work at the Curriculum and Instruction colloquium. Students prepare a visual representation of their work (usually a poster). During the colloquium, students talk to faculty and students about and answer questions about their thesis, project, or other work conducted during the program. In addition, students attend one other colloquium prior to presenting.
  2. Educational Communication and Technology Study Option
    1. Required courses (9 credits minimum): EDC&I 510, EDC&I 511; either EDC&I 551, EDC&I 552, or EDC&I 553
    2. Related courses (6 credits minimum): Courses on the design, development, and use of instructional systems, materials, and approaches in a variety of educational settings, chosen in consultation with adviser
    3. Courses outside Curriculum and Instruction (3-12 credits): Selected with student's adviser. May include courses from any other area in the College and from departments across the University. At least 3 credits must be taken outside the College.
    4. Additional foundations courses (3-6 credits): Students may take additional foundations courses, chosen from the following categories with the approval of the adviser: psychological foundations, educational policy studies, research foundations, or curriculum foundations.
  3. Language, Literacy, and Culture Study Option
    1. Core studies (9 credits): Selected from the following: EDC&I 453, EDC&I 455, EDC&I 457, EDC&I 460, EDC&I 462
    2. Assessment and inquiry (3 credits): In consultation with adviser, select one course that focuses on issues of assessment and inquiry
    3. Concentrations (15 credits): Literacy specialists, in consultation with advisers, select a minimum of three courses in the literacy strand and a minimum of one course in each of the other strands. ESL specialists, in consultation with advisers, select a minimum of three courses in ESL and a minimum of one course in each of the other strands.
  4. Mathematics Education Study Option
    1. At least 27 credits in mathematics and mathematics education. Courses, selected in consultation with the student's adviser; must be appropriate for future career goals. Of the 27 credits, 9 credits chosen from mathematics education courses (below).
    2. Mathematics Education Courses: EDC&I 475, EDC&I 476, EDC&I 477, EDC&I 478 (2-9), EDC&I 479 (1-6); EDC&I 575, EDC&I 576, EDC&I 577 (1-6)
  5. Multicultural Education Study Option
    1. Ethnic Diversity Outside the College of Education (15 credits): Selected in ethnic diversity subject matter fields outside of the College of Education. Courses can be taken from those offered by various departments in the College of Arts and Sciences. All course choices are negotiated with advisers.
    2. Multicultural Education (15 credits): EDC&I 424, EDC&I 569; remainder to be chosen from the following: EDC&I 456 (1-6); EDC&I 464; EDC&I 469; EDC&I 474; EDPSY 536; EDLPS 566; EDC&I 573; EDC&I 574
  6. Science Education Study Option: At least 21 credits, approved by the faculty supervisor, in fields such as, biology, chemistry, physics, earth science, oceanography, or other science-related courses
  7. Social Studies Education Study Option: 12-15 credits of core social studies courses, negotiated with adviser. 15-21 credits of history/social science courses related to teaching interests, or additional educational courses
  8. Teaching and Curriculum Study Option: 27 credits, including 9-18 credits of required study in teaching and curriculum, to be chosen in consultation with adviser

Degree Requirements, Educational Psychology

Minimum 45 credits, to include:

  1. General Requirements
    1. Minimum 45 quarter credits, exclusive of prerequisites and specific requirements listed for each study option
    2. Written or oral examination upon completion of coursework
    3. Research: two options available, thesis, or non-thesis. Thesis option requires design and accomplishment of an empirical study. Non-thesis option requires preparation of a scholarly paper of publishable quality (9 credits minimum).
  2. Foundations of Education courses (12 credits): either EDLPS 521, EDLPS 540, or EDPSY 580; either EDPSY 501 or EDPSY 510; EDPSY 490; EDPSY 591
  3. Measurement, Statistics, and Research Design Study Option (50 minimum total credits)
    1. Required courses: One or more from each of the following content fields with options to consist of courses listed below or alternative courses (including courses outside of Education) approved by the faculty adviser
      1. Measurement and Evaluation: EDPSY 495, EDPSY 512, EDPSY 584, EDPSY 592, EDPSY 595, EDPSY 596, EDPSY 597
      2. Human Development: EDPSY 502, EDPSY 531, EDPSY 532, EDPSY 582
      3. Cognition and Learning: EDPSY 510, EDPSY 524, EDPSY 525, EDPSY 583, PSYCH 414
      4. Language Processes: EDPSY 520, EDPSY 521
    2. Research (9 credits):
      1. Thesis option: Report of a research investigation that requires the student to design and execute an empirical study.
      2. Non-thesis option: Preparation of a scholarly review of the research literature; should be of publishable quality.
  4. Human Development and Cognition Design Study Option (45 minimum total credits)
    1. Required courses: One or more from each of the following content fields with options to consist of courses below or alternative courses (including courses outside of the College) approved by the faculty adviser:
      1. Human Development: EDPSY 502, EDPSY 509, EDPSY 531, EDPSY 532, EDPSY 533, EDPSY 534, EDPSY 582
      2. Cognition and Learning: EDPSY 510, EDPSY 524, EDPSY 525, EDPSY 583, PSYCH 414
      3. Reading and Language Processes: EDPSY 425, EDPSY 507, EDPSY 520, EDPSY 521, EDC&I 532, PSYCH 447/LING 447, PSYCH 457/LING 457, ENGL 472
      4. Measurement and Evaluation: EDPSY 495, EDPSY 512, EDPSY 513, EDPSY 584, EDPSY 592, EDPSY 595, EDPSY 596, EDPSY 597
    2. Research (9 credits):
      1. Thesis option: Report of a research investigation that requires student to design and execute an empirical study.
      2. Non-thesis option: Preparation of a scholarly paper of publishable quality.
  5. School Psychology Specialization (73 credits)
    1. Statistics and Research (6 credits): EDPSY 490, EDPSY 591
    2. Cognition and Learning (3 credits minimum): EDPSY 501; EDPSY 502
    3. Social and Developmental Bases of Behavior (6 credits minimum): EDPSY 502, EDPSY 531
    4. Exceptionality (6 credits minimum): EDSPE 525; and EDSPE 505 or EDSPE 526
    5. Biologic Bases of Behavior (5 credits): EDPSY 577
    6. Specialization Seminars (2 credits minimum): EDPSY 570
    7. Individual Differences and Personality ( 8 credits minimum): EDPSY 548, EDPSY 552
    8. Assessment (21 credits minimum): EDPSY 507, EDPSY 564, EDPSY 540, EDPSY 572, EDPSY 573
    9. Intervention (16 credits minimum): EDPSY 544, EDPSY 546, EDPSY 550, EDPSY 551
    10. Ethics and School (3 credits minimum): EDPSY 568
    11. Courses with Practicum Requirements (3 credits minimum): EDPSY 500
    12. Consultation (3 credits minimum): EDPSY 549
The school psychology MEd degree is awarded upon successful completion of the above course requirements, and successful completion of a portfolio examination of applied and clinical work. At least one course relevant to the student's field of study must be taken from a unit other than the College.

Certification: The Washington State approved internship program at the University of Washington is open only to graduate students who have successfully completed the master's program in school psychology at the University of Washington and are currently matriculated as full time students at the post-master's or doctoral levels. Washington State Certification is awarded by successfully passing the Praxis Exam and by successfully completing a 9-month internship of 1200 hours or more (half of which must be in a school setting) and 6 credit hours of university case study supervision and 30 hours of internship credit. Students who successfully complete the internship may also apply for National Certification as a school psychologist.

Degree Requirements, Education Leadership and Policy Studies

48 credits, as follows:

  1. Common area and distribution requirements (18 credits minimum): Minimum 18 credits of coursework in EDLPS. Of these, 12 credits are distributed as follows:
    1. Social and Cultural Foundations, 6 credits minimum
    2. Organizations and Policy, 6 credits
  2. Specialization requirement (9 credits minimum): In conjunction with the adviser, students develop an area of specialization.
  3. Breadth requirement (6 credits minimum):
    1. At least 3 credits in one or more other areas in the College of Education (EDC&I, EDPSY and/or EDSPE)
    2. At least 3 credits outside the College of Education
  4. Research/inquiry requirement (6 credits minimum):
    1. At least 3 credits in basic statistics (EDPSY 490 or the equivalent)
    2. At least 3 credits in research/inquiry methods (e.g., EDPSY 588, EDPSY 591, EDLPS 524, EDLPS 535, EDLPS 543, EDLPS 568, or the equivalent)
  5. Completion of thesis or non-thesis option (9 credits minimum)
  6. Specific courses determined in consultation with adviser

Degree Requirements, Special Education

48 credits, as follows:

  1. Foundations of Education (6 credits): Minimum 6 credits of courses in or out of the College of Education, or equivalent as determined in consultation with the adviser
  2. Special Education Major Field (21 credits): Specific sequence of courses determined by adviser, depending on student's background, educational goals, and type of disabled individual the student wishes to teach
  3. Assessment and Research Methodology (9 credits): Courses selected in consultation with adviser, to develop competency in assessment of learners with disabilities and familiarity with research tools
  4. Special Assignments in Special Education (12 credits minimum): Divided among at least two of the following options: EDSPE 500 (1-6, max. 6), EDSPE 600, EDSPE 601 (3-9, max. 9), EDSPE 700 (max. 9). Students entering an EdD or PhD program should select a thesis option.

Doctor of Education

Designed to prepare professionals whose primary interest is to deal directly with problems of educational practice. The program of study leading to the EdD, as a professional degree, focuses on the utilization of research and practitioners' knowledge, rather than on the production of research knowledge.

This professional degree requires at least two years of resident study, a program of specialized study with credit in education and related fields, sufficient preparation in research methodology to interpret research findings for use in practice, an internship and leadership training, a general examination, a dissertation on a problem of educational practice, and a final examination.

Admission Requirements

  1. Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores
  2. Master's degree or equivalent from an accredited institution
  3. Minimum GPA of 3.00 for the most recent 90 (60 semester) credits
  4. Transcripts (sealed) from each college or university attended.
  5. Goal statement
  6. Three letters of recommendation
  7. Resume/curriculum vita
  8. Writing sample(s)
  9. Interviews
  10. Specific programs may have additional admission requirements. Visit the website or contact the program for further information.

Degree Requirements

102 credits, as follows:

  1. Educational Specialization (24 credits):
    1. Courses in one specialty within the area of specialization designed to provide student with knowledge of the field: 9 credits
    2. Courses in the general area or in the student's special interests within the area of specialization other than those selected to fulfill the 9 credits above: 15 credits
  2. Related Field(s) (24 credits): Courses selected from within education (minimum of 12 credits) or outside of education which complement the student's educational specialization and include multidisciplinary learning experiences
  3. Research/Evaluation Preparation (9 credits): Courses selected to enhance a student's ability to conduct field-based research/evaluation studies
  4. Leadership Training (9 credits): EDLPS 520, EDLPS 550, EDLPS 560
  5. Supervised Internships and Field Experiences (9 credits): Internships and field experiences are designed to work in education and the related field(s), and to conduct field-based research and evaluation studies.
  6. Dissertation (27 credits)

Doctor of Philosophy

A degree offering preparation for a research career on issues fundamental to education -- issues that range from fairly narrow questions about human learning to macro-questions regarding the form of societies' educational institutions. The scope is broad. The degree may be organized around traditional study areas such as educational psychology, curriculum and instruction, special education, or educational leadership and policy. A student may develop a course of study that integrates various elements of more than one study area (e.g., multiethnic education and literacy). One study option is school psychology, which prepares students for the professional practice of psychology with school-age children, as well as for research.

Admission Requirements

  1. Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores
  2. Master's degree or equivalent from an accredited institution
  3. Minimum GPA of 3.00 for the most recent 90 (60 semester) credits
  4. Transcripts (sealed) from each college or university attended.
  5. Goal statement
  6. Three letters of recommendation
  7. Resume/curriculum vita
  8. Writing sample(s)
  9. Interviews

Degree Requirements

Minimum 90 credits, to include:

Consist of six academic areas and the dissertation. The PhD is specialized and highly individualized. Although the department prescribes a limited number of required courses, it does require that students demonstrate in-depth knowledge of education and selected related fields. For most students, this means study in a broad area, a specialization within that area, two cognates, and a specialization outside of the department.

Degree requirements include a minimum two years of resident study, a program of specialized study with credits both in education and in other academic units, preparation in research methodology adequate to design and assess research in the field of specialization, sufficient study in cognate fields inside and outside education to ensure that the candidate can place the specialized research in a broader context, a general examination, a research dissertation, and a final examination.

Accreditation

Within the College of Education, a number of degree programs have formal accreditation. The school psychology PhD program is accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA) and approved by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP). The school psychology MEd program is also accredited by NASP and the Washington State Board of Education for initial residency and continuing/professional teaching certificates and initial/residency certification. Graduates qualify for certification in all states party to the Interstate Certification Compact.

Financial Aid

The College of Education offers a limited number of awards with varying stipends for graduate students in education. Primary consideration is given to doctoral students with a background of successful teaching or administrative experience. Specific information on the various types of remunerative appointments for graduate students in education, amounts of stipends, and application procedures may be obtained via email at edinfo@uw.edu or via the College's website at education.washington.edu/. The annual application deadline is March 1.

Professional Programs

Professional Certification

The College of Education is authorized by the State Board of Education to offer professional certificate programs in education for administrators, educational staff associates, and teachers. Program-design specialists are available to help with pre-program counseling, long-range planning, applications, registration, referrals to other campus resources, general program advising, and continuing/professional certificate requirements.

Administrator Certificates

Administrator certificate preparation programs for superintendents, principals, and program administrators are offered through the College of Education. The following websites contain specific information about admissions, curriculum, faculty, and general advising:

For principals and program administrators, the Danforth Educational Leadership Program, depts.washington.edu/k12admin/danforth/.

For superintendents, the Leadership for Learning Program, depts.washington.edu/k12admin/l4l/.

Educational Staff Associate Certificates

Educational staff associate certificate preparation programs are offered for the school psychologist. Information concerning requirements and admission may be obtained from the Area for Educational Psychology, 312 Miller, Box 353600, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-3600.

The College of Education is authorized by the State Board of Education to prepare and recommend individuals for Residency and Professional Teaching Certificates. Title II of the Higher Education Act requires institutions of higher education and states that approve such programs to develop and publish an annual report on their teacher preparation programs. The University of Washington report may be viewed on the web at education.washington.edu/pdf/UW06-07Title_II_Report.pdf, or requested via email from edinfo@uw.edu.

Residency Teaching Certification Program

The College of Education offers residency teaching certification for individuals desiring careers as elementary or middle/secondary school teachers, or as special education teachers working with students with severe disabilities or emotional and behavioral disorders, and with infants, toddlers, and preschool children with disabilities. Candidates may also select a teacher education/special education option which provides initial certification in elementary education with coursework in special education. All programs are offered at the master's level. For additional information, e-mail edinfo@uw.edu, or visit the College's website at education.washington.edu/.

An undergraduate or postbaccalaureate program leading to certification in music education, grades K-12, is offered through the School of Music. For additional information contact the School of Music Advising Office, 116 Music, Box 353450, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-3450.

Professional Teaching Certificates

For information on the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) guidelines and where programs exist, contact any Educational Service District or the Office of Professional Licensing and Certification, OSPI, Box 47200, Old Capitol Building, Olympia, Washington 98504, or visit www.k12.wa.us/cert/. For information about Professional Teacher Certificate programs at the University, contact Center Connect at (206) 543-7834.

Endorsements on Teaching Certificates

Teachers holding an initial/residency or continuing/professional teaching certificate may add endorsements to their certificates which qualify them to teach additional subjects. Information on endorsement requirements is available on the web at education.washington.edu/areas/tep/pathways/, or contact the Office of Admissions and Academic Support, 211 Miller, Seattle, WA 98195-3600, or e-mail edinfo@uw.edu.

Special Research and Service Facilities

Within the College of Education, opportunities exist for students to gain research and service experience.

The Center for Multicultural Education focuses on research projects and activities designed to improve practices related to equity issues, intergroup relations, and the achievement of students of color. Visit the center's website at education.washington.edu/cme/.

The Clinical Training Laboratory, operating under the aegis of Educational Psychology, offers observation rooms equipped with video recorders where counseling and psychology trainees and clients can be observed and taped through one-way mirrors.

The renowned Experimental Education Unit (EEU) offers an interdisciplinary approach to research, training, and service, providing integrated classes for 150-200 young children, toddlers, and infants with disabilities and their typically developing peers, and services for their families. Learn more about the EEU by visiting www.haringcenter.washington.edu/welcome-haring-center.

The Multidisciplinary Learning Disabilities Center conducts research on preventing and treating reading and writing disabilities and on the biological basis of learning disabilities. The center disseminates its findings to teachers through workshops and presentations at regional, national, and international meetings, and at a unique teacher mentoring program during the summer program for students with dyslexia and dysgraphia.

The Write Stuff investigates interventions for preventing and treating writing disabilities.

The National Center for the Study of Teaching and Policy, a consortium of five universities headed by the University of Washington, conducts a wide range of studies aimed at local, state, and national policy strategies to promote teacher excellence. For more information, visit the center's website at depts.washington.edu/ctpmail, or e-mail ctpmail@uw.edu.

The Institute for the Study of Educational Policy promotes interdisciplinary studies that bring together research and practice for the benefit of children and youth, educators, policy makers, and the larger community. The institute includes (a) The Center for Educational Renewal, which responds to a growing nationwide interest in the renewal of schools and teacher education by creating partnerships, promoting innovative programs and policies for the education of educators, and reforming leadership and governance structures; (b) The Center for Effective Schools, which is committed to engaging in research and service activities designed to promote instructionally effective schools through collaboration and self-evaluation; (c) The Center for the Study and Teaching of At-Risk Students, which was established to foster interprofessional projects to encourage students to stay in school; and (d) The School Law Division, which deals with the improvement of professional practices of school administrators, including superintendents, principals, and program directors. Additionally, the institute conducts policy research pursuant to grants and contracts with school districts, state and federal agencies, and other educational organizations.