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College of Built Environments

College Overview

224 Gould

Dean
John Schaufelberger

Associate Dean
Jeffrey Ochsner

www.be.washington.edu

The College of Built Environments (CBE) devotes its resources to the tangible improvement of built and natural environments. Four departments comprise the college: architecture, construction management, landscape architecture, and urban design and planning. Each prepares students for professional careers involving the design, planning, production, and sustainability of physical and natural environments, as well as addressing policies and programs that engage problems of urban growth and livable communities.

The College offers a variety of programs and degrees focusing on the environmental design and construction disciplines within a liberal arts education. The undergraduate programs of the Departments of Construction Management and Landscape Architecture lead to professional degrees that serve as the educational credentials for careers in their respective fields. Undergraduate programs in the Departments of Architecture and Urban Design and Planning offer students pre-professional undergraduate majors-in Architectural Studies and in Community, Environment, and Planning respectively-that prepares students for professional programs in the design and planning disciplines, as well as related leadership roles in society.

The College offers a variety of professional and post-professional Master's degrees: Master of Architecture; Master of Science in Architecture; Master of Science in Construction Management (evening degree); Master of Urban Planning; Master of Landscape Architecture; and Master of Science in Real Estate. Master's students may elect also to work toward the interdisciplinary Certificates in Urban Design and in Historic Preservation. The College offers two interdisciplinary doctoral degrees: the Ph.D. in the Built Environment and the Ph.D. in Urban Design and Planning. All program curricula encompass an appropriate level of design and technical understanding, and include broader social, economic, and cultural issues fundamental to understanding, preserving, and enriching our built and natural environments.

As a part of a major university and metropolis in the Pacific Northwest, the College directly engages this extraordinary setting as a laboratory for study. Faculty members in CBE departments and programs work closely with various professional communities to build curricula and offer experience attuned to the understanding and creation of appropriate built environments.

Facilities

Computing Facilities

Mark Baratta, Director

The College provides an extensive computing infrastructure to support student work. Students have easy access to high-speed wired and wireless networking in the College's buildings, computers in labs and studios, a comprehensive collection of software used in our disciplines, specialized hardware (large-format scanning and plotting, laser cutters, 3D printer), an equipment loaner program (laptops, digital cameras (fixed-lens and SLR), camcorders, digital audio recorders, projectors), and consulting. Most classrooms and seminar rooms are equipped with projectors; several have interactive whiteboard displays.

Built Environments Library

Alan Michelson, Librarian

The Built Environments Library, 334 Gould, is the primary location for materials on architecture, landscape architecture, construction management, and urban design and planning. The collection contains 46,745 volumes, 7,500 microforms, and 163 currently-received serial subscriptions and 243 serial titles in total. Access to its collection is provided through the UW Libraries Information Gateway, a single World Wide Web location which encompasses all the library's print and electronic resources as well as tools, services, and the ability to search the library's catalog and a wide range of Internet resources. The Gateway is available in all UW libraries and on the Web at www.lib.washington.edu.

Photography Lab

John Stamets, Lecturer

A large photography laboratory is provided with studio and film darkroom facilities for use by photography classes, design-studio classes, special instruction, and independent activity.

Shop

Penny Maulden, Director

Fully staffed and well-equipped workshops provide students opportunities to design and make projects using wood, metals, concrete, plaster, plastics and other materials. A wide and deep selection of hand-tools, machine-tools and digital fabrication tools support the instructional use of the workshops and adjacent classroom. Coursework and research supported by the workshops include building design, design/build, furniture studios, structures, materials, and digital fabrication courses. Individual projects including thesis and research can also be accommodated.

Visual Resources Collection

Joshua Polansky, Director

The Visual Resources Collection consists of over 80,000 digital images covering architectural, landscape, design and planning, and construction subject matter, supporting the curricular and research needs of the College. They are accessible to students and faculty through an online image database. New materials for lectures and projects are continually added.

Undergraduate Degree Programs

The College of Built Environments offers the following professional and pre-professional undergraduate degree options and opportunities:

College Bachelor Degree Programs

Minors and Dual Degree Options

Graduate Program

The College of Built Environments offers the following professional, post-professional graduate degrees, and doctoral options and opportunities:

College Graduate Degree Programs

Interdisciplinary Ph.D Degree Programs

College-wide Certificate Programs

Historic Preservation Certificate Program

The College of Built Environments offers education in historic preservation. This approach reflects a conscious choice to emphasize preservation within the context of the individual design professions. Thus, the curriculum offers an awareness and familiarity with issues involved in the identification, designation, interpretation, and preservation of historic places, as well as the restoration, adaptive reuse, and design of sympathetic new construction in historic contexts.

Program Coordinator
Box 355740
206-543-5996
histpres@uw.edu
www.be.washington.edu/certificates/hp.html

Admission Requirements

Open to students accepted into a professional or graduate program in the College of Built Environments, including the M.Arch., M.S. (Arch. History/Theory), B.L.A., M.L.A., M.U.P., and Ph.D. programs. Application is made first for admission to a degree program within the college. Once accepted, a separate "Statement of Interest" form is required. Application is made within the first two weeks of classes for two-year degree programs, and by the end of the first year for three-year programs.

Certificate Requirements

The certificate consists of courses required for the student's degree and an additional, complementary 12-15 credits of preservation study which may not overlap with courses required for students' degrees but which may fall into elective requirements and be part of the total credits required for the degree. We recommend students meet with the program coordinator and Preservation faculty to choose the courses that will best complement their degree program and academic interests in preservation.

  1. Track I: Requirements for Students in the M.Arch. Degree Program
    1. Courses Required from the M.Arch. curriculum: ARCH 500 (6), ARCH 590 (3), an advanced studio on preservation design or design in an historic context
    2. Core Certificate Courses: ARCH 582 (3) if available; Case Studies, either ARCH 498 (3) or URBDP 587 (3); Preservation Planning, either URBDP 585 (3) or URBDP 586 (4)
    3. Elective Course(s): Additional electives in areas related to preservation in architecture, landscape architecture, planning, or related design.
    4. Thesis: Thesis topic with content in the area of preservation design or related issues in historic preservation. Thesis committee chaired by a member of the Historic Preservation faculty.
  2. Track II: Requirements for Students in the B.L.A., M.L.A., M.S. (Arch), M.U.P., and Ph.D. Degree Programs
    1. Courses Required from Degree Curriculum: Any required or "selective" courses with preservation/historical content, and if the degree requires studio work (B.L.A., M.L.A., M.U.P), choose a studio with preservation content.
    2. Core Certificate Courses: URBDP 585 (3), URBDP 586 (4), one graduate seminar in preservation planning (3).
    3. Elective Course(s): Additional electives in areas related to preservation in architecture, landscape architecture, planning, or related design.
    4. Thesis: Thesis, professional paper, or dissertation topic with content in the area of preservation planning and design or related issues in historic preservation. Thesis must be chaired by a member of the Historic Preservation faculty.

Urban Design Certificate Program

The College of Built Environments offers an interdisciplinary program which leads to the Certificate of Achievement in Urban Design for students in the B.L.A., M.L.A., M.Arch., and M.U.P. professional degrees and to students in the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Urban Design and Planning or the Ph.D. in the Built Environment. It is designed to give students in these programs a broad and strong understanding of urban design that they may incorporate into their later professional and scholarly careers.

Program Coordinator
Box 355740
206-543-5996
ud@uw.edu
www.be.washington.edu/certificates/ud.html

Admission Requirements

Any student accepted into the degree programs listed above is eligible and may begin participate in the program by returning a Statement of Interest (this form may be obtained from the program office or the program website). We recommend that students in two-year programs apply at the beginning of their programs and that those in longer programs apply at the beginning of their second year. However, students must possess the necessary design abilities prior to enrollment in advanced studios. Such enrollment is determined by the studio in question (for example, advanced studios may require a prerequisite studio preparatory class and/or previous studios and/or the equivalent as evaluated by the studio instructor).

Certificate Requirements

The certificate consists of courses required for the student's degree and an additional, complementary 12-15 credits of urban design courses, which may not overlap with courses required for students' degrees but which may fall into elective requirements and be part of the total credits required for the degree.

These requirements vary with the students' degree requirements (for example, if a course listed below is required for the students' degree requirements, the student must meet the 12-15 credit requirement by choosing an additional course). We recommend students meet with the program coordinator and Urban Design Program faculty to choose the courses that will best complement their degree program and academic interests in urban design.

  1. Core Curriculum:
    1. Introductory Course: ARCH 590 (M.Arch. and M.L.A. students); L ARCH 362 (B.L.A. students); URBDP 470 (any program); URBDP 500 (M.U.P. students)
    2. URBDP 479
    3. URBDP 580
    4. Thesis prep as appropriate for students' degree programs
  2. Urban Design Studios: Three required from ARCH 500-505, L ARCH 402-403, L ARCH 503-505, or URBDP 507-508 as designated by the program each quarter; students must take at least one studio either outside their home department or with a clear interdisciplinary focus)
  3. Mandatory Course Areas
    1. Urban Form and History: one course from L ARCH 450, L ARCH 451, L ARCH 498 (when history of urban design), URBDP 564, URBDP 565, or others as appropriate
    2. Urban Design Methods: two courses from L ARCH 341, L ARCH 571, URBDP 474, URBDP 576, URBDP 598, or others as appropriate
    3. Urban Studies: one course from PB AF 527, URBDP 422, URBDP 466, URBDP 500, URBDP 510, URBDP 520, URBDP 530, URBDP 560, URBDP 562, or others as appropriate
    4. Urban Development: one course from URBDP 561, URBDP 552, URBDP 553, URBDP 554, URBDP 555, or others as appropriate
  4. Thesis: Students' theses, professional projects, or dissertations must have an urban design component and a member of the Urban Design Program faculty member as their committee chair.