Energy Research at the University of Washington

Thomas M. Hinckley

Energy Research Area: Understanding the effects of climate and climate change on tree carbon exchange and growth under natural and managed systems. As growing seasons become longer, warmer and drier, how do different species acclimate to these stresses?

Interim Director and David RM Scott Professor of Forest Resources
Atmospheric Sciences
School of Environmental and Forest Sciences

I am interested in the carbon and water economy of trees and woody shrubs. Studies by me, my students, and collaborators are currently being conducted at 1600 and 7100 feet on Snowshoe Mountain in the NE Cascades. At these two sites, we are monitoring microclimate, soil moisture, individual tree water loss and tree diameter growth. Our study species are ponderosa pine, Engelmann spruce and Whitebark pine. These two altitudes represent the elevational limits of trees species in this part of Washington. We anticipate that trees at such elevations should be very sensitive to climate.

Horses and mules were used to transport 650 lbs of equipment, which was then distributed between 7150 and 7800 feet.  Ettl and Weintraub make sure that the datalogger is working the solar panel and marine battery keep everything powered
Horses and mules were used to transport 650 lbs of equipment, which was then distributed between 7150 and 7800 feet. Ettl and Weintraub make sure that the datalogger is working the solar panel and marine battery keep everything powered

Campus and Other Collaborators/Partners

Record last updated on November 28th 2011 PDT.