Energy Research at the University of Washington

Rose Ann Cattolico

Energy Research Area: Biochemical, molecular and ecological analysis of phototosynthetic algae. Emphasis on chloroplast evolution, photosynthetic processes, and harmful algal bloom formation, population diversity, lipid biogenesis and biofuel production.

Professor
College of Arts and Sciences
Biology

The development of new algal strains has become the linchpin in the value train for a number of emerging commercial endeavors. The use of algae as a source of oil for biofuels has recently received the attention of industry, venture capital investors, and university clean-energy programs. This interest has initiated a burst of technological advances predominately focused on engineering new photoreactors, methods for retrieving algal cells from their growth medium or efficiently extracting lipids from algal cells. As these technological advances mature, algae are becoming more attractive for use in a broad range of additional significant, energy-related endeavors. For example, a rapidly expanding interest is to also use algae as a supplement human, pet, cattle, and fish foods. We use non-GMO technology to generate algal strains with increased lipid and protein content. Additionally, we use our proprietary knowledge to produce and market new tools that improve the efficient management of algal growth and the analysis of algal cellular products.

Figure Legend:  Algal cells stained to reveal lipid contents. Red (autofluorescence of chloroplasts); green( lipid containing vesicles)
Figure Legend: Algal cells stained to reveal lipid contents. Red (autofluorescence of chloroplasts); green( lipid containing vesicles)

Research Images

Researcher submitted image

Company Spin Outs / Technology Licensing

Campus and Other Collaborators/Partners

Record last updated on November 28th 2011 PST.