Energy Research at the University of Washington

Joel A. Thornton

Energy Research Area: The impacts of energy generation on air quality and the atmosphere's natural oxidizing capacity.

Associate Professor
College of the Environment
Atmospheric Sciences

More than 65% of atmospheric nitrogen oxide radicals are emitted by human-induced combustion for transportation and energy production. Once in the atmosphere, these reactive nitrogen species catalyze ozone production, and regulate the conversion of volatile organic compounds into particulate matter. Ozone and particulate matter in turn have important health effects and impact climate through greenhouse gas lifetimes and Earth’s radiation budget. Our research is aimed at understanding the fate and effects of nitrogen oxide radicals in the atmosphere.

Glenn Wolfe, a graduate student in Thornton's research group, performing maintenance on measurement tower.
Glenn Wolfe, a graduate student in Thornton's research group, performing maintenance on measurement tower.

Campus and Other Collaborators/Partners

Record last updated on November 29th 2011 PDT.