Energy Research at the University of Washington

Janneke Hille Ris Lambers

Energy Research Area: The Heat is On: Forecasting the Impacts of Climate Change on Pacific Northwestern Mountains

Assistant Professor
College of Arts and Sciences

Humans are changing the weather worldwide, with rising temperatures and declining snowpack in the Pacific Northwest. The challenge of forecasting how such climate change impacts ecosystems motivates our research at Mount Rainier National Park. We monitor plant growth, survival and reproduction across the large climatic gradients this iconic mountain provides, and combine these data with models to predict how and how fast forests and alpine meadows will respond to changing climates. Such information is critical to understanding how ecosystem services provided by Pacific Northwestern mountains (e.g. carbon sequestration, biodiversity, timber, water supply) will be impacted by climate change.

Hille Ris Lambers field crew from 2008, Undergraduate Jonathan Deschamps, graduate student Ailene Kane, Undergraduate student Gerald Lisi
Hille Ris Lambers field crew from 2008, Undergraduate Jonathan Deschamps, graduate student Ailene Kane, Undergraduate student Gerald Lisi

Research Images

Graduate student Ailene Kane and undergraduate Jonathan Deschamps attach a temperature sensor to a pulley system, allowing them to hoist the sensor high in the canopy so it won’t get covered by snowpack in the winter Graduate students Ailene Kane and Kevin Ford identify wildflowers in Paradise Meadows, Mount Rainier National Park Mount Rainier from Pinnacle Peak: our study site

Campus and Other Collaborators/Partners

Record last updated on November 28th 2011 PST.