Energy Research at the University of Washington

David S. Ginger

Energy Research Area: Next Generation Solar Cells, Advanced Microscopy, Organic Photovoltaics, Quantum Dots, Plasmonics

Associate Professor, Chemistry
College of Arts and Sciences

We make and characterize new nanostructured solar cells and energy efficient light-emitting diodes. We supplement conventional device testing and spectroscopy by pioneering new tools such time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy (trEFM) and photocondutive atomic force microscopy (pcAFM). We study organic semiconductors, colloidal quantum dots, and plasmon resonant nanoparticles for optoelectronics applications.

We learn how nanostructured solar cells work using unique tools. PhD student Obadiah Reid aligns the laser in the Ginger Lab’s photoconductive atomic force microscopy (pcAFM) before using it to study a plastic photovoltaic cell.
We learn how nanostructured solar cells work using unique tools. PhD student Obadiah Reid aligns the laser in the Ginger Lab’s photoconductive atomic force microscopy (pcAFM) before using it to study a plastic photovoltaic cell.

Research Images

Schematic of the pcAFM apparatus Journal back cover: a stylized atomic force microscope probe images performance of organic solar cells being printed in a continuous roll-to-roll process. Photoluminescence from a series of colloidal quantum dots synthesized in the Ginger Lab at UW.  We are studying these materials for use in both thin film solar cells and energy efficient light emitting diodes.

Campus and Other Collaborators/Partners

Record last updated on November 28th 2011 PDT.