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Pine man pages, Version 4.64

pine
pico
pilot
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rpdump

  

pine

 

NAME

pine - a Program for Internet News and Email  

SYNTAX

pine [ options ] [ address , address ]

pinef [ options ] [ address , address ]  

DESCRIPTION

Pine is a screen-oriented message-handling tool. In its default configuration, Pine offers an intentionally limited set of functions geared toward the novice user, but it also has a growing list of optional "power-user" and personal-preference features. pinef is a variant of Pine that uses function keys rather than mnemonic single-letter commands. Pine's basic feature set includes:

View, Save, Export, Delete, Print, Reply and Forward messages.
Compose messages in a simple editor (Pico) with word-wrap and a spelling checker. Messages may be postponed for later completion.
Full-screen selection and management of message folders.
Address book to keep a list of long or frequently-used addresses. Personal distribution lists may be defined. Addresses may be taken into the address book from incoming mail without retyping them.
New mail checking and notification occurs automatically every 2.5 minutes and after certain commands, e.g. refresh-screen (Ctrl-L).
On-line, context-sensitive help screens.

Pine supports MIME (Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions), an Internet Standard for representing multipart and multimedia data in email. Pine allows you to save MIME objects to files, and in some cases, can also initiate the correct program for viewing the object. It uses the system's mailcap configuration file to determine what program can process a particular MIME object type. Pine's message composer does not have integral multimedia capability, but any type of data file --including multimedia-- can be attached to a text message and sent using MIME's encoding rules. This allows any group of individuals with MIME-capable mail software (e.g. Pine, PC-Pine, or many other programs) to exchange formatted documents, spread-sheets, image files, etc, via Internet email.

Pine uses the c-client messaging API to access local and remote mail folders. This library provides a variety of low-level message-handling functions, including drivers for a variety of different mail file formats, as well as routines to access remote mail and news servers, using IMAP (Internet Message Access Protocol) and NNTP (Network News Transport Protocol). Outgoing mail is usually handed-off to the Unix sendmail, program but it can optionally be posted directly via SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol).  

OPTIONS

The command line options/arguments are:

address
Send mail to address. This will cause Pine to go directly into the message composer.
-attach file
Send mail with the listed file as an attachment.
-attachlist file-list
Send mail with the listed file-list as an attachments.
-attach_and_delete file
Send mail with the listed file as an attachment, and remove the file after the message is sent.
-aux local_directory
PC-Pine only. When using a remote configuration (-p <remote_config>) this tells PC-Pine the local directory to use for storing auxiliary files, like debug files, address books, and signature files.
-bail
Exit if the pinerc file does not exist. This might be useful if the config file is accessed using some remote filesystem protocol. If the remote mount is missing this will cause Pine to quit instead of creating a new pinerc.
-c context-number
context-number is the number corresponding to the folder-collection to which the -f command line argument should be applied. By default the -f argument is applied to the first defined folder-collection.
-conf
Produce a sample/fresh copy of the system-wide configuration file, pine.conf, on the standard output. This is distinct from the per-user .pinerc file.
-convert_sigs -p pinerc
Convert signature files into literal signatures.
-copy_abook <local_abook> <remote_abook>
Copy the local address book file to a remote address book folder.
-copy_pinerc <local_pinerc> <remote_pinerc>
Copy the local pinerc file to a remote pinerc folder.
-create_lu addrbook sort-order
Creates auxiliary index (look-up) file for addrbook and sorts addrbook in sort-order, which may be dont-sort, nickname, fullname, nickname-with-lists-last, or fullname-with-lists-last. Useful when creating global or shared address books. After creating the index file in this way, the file should be moved or copied in a way which preserves the mtime of the address book file. The mtime of the address book file at the time the index file was built is stored inside the index file and a comparison between that stored value and the current mtime of the address book file is done when somebody runs pine. If the mtime has changed since the index file was made, then pine will want to rebuild the index file. In other words, don't build the index file with this option and then copy the address book to its final destination in a way which changes the file's mtime.
-d debug-level
Output diagnostic info at debug-level (0-9) to the current .pine-debug[1-4] file. A value of 0 turns debugging off and suppresses the .pine-debug file.
-d key[=val]
Fine tuned output of diagnostic messages where "flush" causes debug file writing without buffering, "timestamp" appends each message with a timestamp, "imap=n" where n is between 0 and 4 representing none to verbose IMAP telemetry reporting, "numfiles=n" where n is between 0 and 31 corresponding to the number of debug files to maintain, and "verbose=n" where n is between 0 and 9 indicating an inverse threshold for message output.
-f folder
Open folder (in first defined folder collection, use -c n to specify another collection) instead of INBOX.
-F file
Open named text file and view with Pine's browser.
-h
Help: list valid command-line options.
-i
Start up in the FOLDER INDEX screen.
-I keystrokes
Initial (comma separated list of) keystrokes which Pine should execute on startup.
-install
For PC-Pine only, this option causes PC-Pine to prompt for some basic setup information, then exits.
-k
Use function keys for commands. This is the same as running the command pinef.
-n number
Start up with current message-number set to number.
-o
Open first folder read-only.
-p config-file
Use config-file as the personal configuration file instead of the default .pinerc.
-P config-file
Use config-file as the configuration file instead of default system-wide configuration file pine.conf.
-pinerc file
Output fresh pinerc configuration to file, preserving the settings of variables that the user has made. Use file set to ``-'' to make output go to standard out. <IP> -registry cmd 20 For PC-Pine only, this option affects the values of Pine's registry entries. Possible values for cmd are set, clear, and dump. Set will always reset Pine's registry entries according to its current settings. Clear will clear the registry values. Clearsilent will silently clear the registry values. Dump will display the values of current registry settings. Note that the dump command is currently disabled. Without the -registry option, PC-Pine will write values into the registry only if there currently aren't any values set.
-r
Use restricted/demo mode. Pine will only send mail to itself and functions like save and export are restricted.
-sort order
Sort the FOLDER INDEX display in one of the following orders: arrival, date, subject, orderedsubj, thread, from, size, score, to, cc, or reverse. Arrival order is the default. The OrderedSubj choice simulates a threaded sort. Any sort may be reversed by adding /reverse to it. Reverse by itself is the same as arrival/reverse.
-supported
Some options may or may not be supported depending on how Pine was compiled. This is a way to determine which options are supported in the particular copy of Pine you are using.
-url url
Open the given url. Cannot be used with -f or -F options.
-v
Version: Print version information.
-version
Version: Print version information.
-x config
Use configuration exceptions in config. Exceptions are used to override your default pinerc settings for a particular platform, can be a local file or a remote folder.
-z
Enable ^Z and SIGTSTP so pine may be suspended.
-option=value
Assign value to the config option option e.g. -signature-file=sig1 or -feature-list=signature-at-bottom (Note: feature-list values are additive)
 

CONFIGURATION

There are several levels of Pine configuration. Configuration values at a given level over-ride corresponding values at lower levels. In order of increasing precedence:


 o built-in defaults.

 o system-wide  pine.conf file.

 o personal  .pinerc file (may be set via built-in Setup/Config menu.)

 o command-line options.

 o system-wide  pine.conf.fixed file.

There is one exception to the rule that configuration values are replaced by the value of the same option in a higher-precedence file: the feature-list variable has values that are additive, but can be negated by prepending "no-" in front of an individual feature name. Unix Pine also uses the following environment variables:


  TERM

  DISPLAY     (determines if Pine can display IMAGE attachments.)

  SHELL       (if not set, default is /bin/sh )

  MAILCAPS    (semicolon delimited list of path names to mailcap files)  

FILES

/usr/spool/mail/xxxx        Default folder for incoming mail.

~/mail                     Default directory for mail folders.

~/.addressbook             Default address book file.

~/.addressbook.lu          Default address book index file.

~/.pine-debug[1-4]         Diagnostic log for debugging.

~/.pinerc                  Personal pine config file.

~/.newsrc                  News subscription/state file.

~/.signature               Default signature file.

~/.mailcap                 Personal mail capabilities file.

~/.mime.types              Personal file extension to MIME type mapping

/etc/mailcap               System-wide mail capabilities file.

/etc/mime.types            System-wide file ext. to MIME type mapping

/usr/local/lib/pine.info   Local pointer to system administrator.

/usr/local/lib/pine.conf   System-wide configuration file.

/usr/local/lib/pine.conf.fixed Non-overridable configuration file.

/tmp/.\usr\spool\mail\xxxx Per-folder mailbox lock files.

~/.pine-interrupted-mail   Message which was interrupted.

~/mail/postponed-msgs      For postponed messages.

~/mail/sent-mail           Outgoing message archive (FCC).

~/mail/saved-messages      Default destination for Saving messages.
 

SEE ALSO

pico(1), binmail(1), aliases(5), mailaddr(7), sendmail(8), spell(1), imapd(8)


Newsgroup: comp.mail.pine
Pine Information Center: http://www.washington.edu/pine
Source distribution: ftp://ftp.cac.washington.edu/pine/pine.tar.Z
Pine Technical Notes, included in the source distribution.
C-Client messaging API library, included in the source distribution.  

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS


The University of Washington Pine development team (part of the UW Office 
of Computing & Communications) includes:
 
 Project Leader:           Mike Seibel
 Principal authors:        Mike Seibel, Steve Hubert, Laurence Lundblade*
 C-Client library & IMAPd: Mark Crispin
 Pico, the PIne COmposer:  Mike Seibel
 Documentation:            Many people!
 PC-Pine for Windows:      Tom Unger, Mike Seibel
 Project oversight:        Terry Gray, Lori Stevens
 Principal Patrons:        Ron Johnson, Mike Bryant
 Additional support:       NorthWestNet
 Initial Pine code base:   Elm, by Dave Taylor & USENET Community Trust
 Initial Pico code base:   MicroEmacs 3.6, by Dave G. Conroy
 User Interface design:    Inspired by UCLA's "Ben" mailer for MVS
 Suggestions/fixes/ports:  Folks from all over!

   *Emeritus

Copyright 1989-2006 by the University of Washington.
Pine and Pico are trademarks of the University of Washington.

$Date: 2005-09-15 14:01:32 -0700 (Thu, 15 Sep 2005) $

pine Version 4.64


  

pico

 

Name

pico - simple text editor in the style of the Pine Composer  

Syntax

pico [ options ] [ file ]  

Description

Pico is a simple, display-oriented text editor based on the Pine message system composer. As with Pine, commands are displayed at the bottom of the screen, and context-sensitive help is provided. As characters are typed they are immediately inserted into the text.

Editing commands are entered using control-key combinations. As a work-around for communications programs that swallow certain control characters, you can emulate a control key by pressing ESCAPE twice, followed by the desired control character, e.g. "ESC ESC c" would be equivalent to entering a ctrl-c. The editor has five basic features: paragraph justification, searching, block cut/paste, a spelling checker, and a file browser.

Paragraph justification (or filling) takes place in the paragraph that contains the cursor, or, if the cursor is between lines, in the paragraph immediately below. Paragraphs are delimited by blank lines, or by lines beginning with a space or tab. Unjustification can be done immediately after justification using the control-U key combination.

String searches are not sensitive to case. A search begins at the current cursor position and wraps around the end of the text. The most recent search string is offered as the default in subsequent searches.

Blocks of text can be moved, copied or deleted with creative use of the command for mark (ctrl-^), delete (ctrl-k) and undelete (ctrl-u). The delete command will remove text between the "mark" and the current cursor position, and place it in the "cut" buffer. The undelete command effects a "paste" at the current cursor position.

The spell checker examines all words in the text. It then offers, in turn, each misspelled word for correction while highlighting it in the text. Spell checking can be cancelled at any time. Alternatively, pico will substitute for the default spell checking routine a routine defined by the SPELL environment variable. The replacement routine should read standard input and write standard output.

The file browser is offered as an option in the "Read File" and "Write Out" command prompts. It is intended to help in searching for specific files and navigating directory hierarchies. Filenames with sizes and names of directories in the current working directory are presented for selection. The current working directory is displayed on the top line of the display while the list of available commands takes up the bottom two. Several basic file manipulation functions are supported: file renaming, copying, and deletion.

More specific help is available in pico's online help.  

Options

+n
Causes pico to be started with the cursor located n lines into the file. (Note: no space between "+" sign and number)
-a
Display all files including those beginning with a period (.).
-b
Enable the option to Replace text matches found using the "Where is" command.
-d
Rebind the "delete" key so the character the cursor is on is rubbed out rather than the character to its left.
-e
Enable file name completion.
-f
Use function keys for commands. This option supported only in conjunction with UW Enhanced NCSA telnet.
-h
List valid command line options.
-j
Enable "Goto" command in the file browser. This enables the command to permit explicitly telling pilot which directory to visit.
-g
Enable "Show Cursor" mode in file browser. Cause cursor to be positioned before the current selection rather than placed at the lower left of the display.
-k
Causes "Cut Text" command to remove characters from the cursor position to the end of the line rather than remove the entire line.
-m
Enable mouse functionality. This only works when pico is run from within an X Window System "xterm" window.
-nn
The -nn option enables new mail notification. The n argument is optional, and specifies how often, in seconds, your mailbox is checked for new mail. For example, -n60 causes pico to check for new mail once every minute. The default interval is 180 seconds, while the minimum allowed is 30. (Note: no space between "n" and the number)
-o dir
Sets operating directory. Only files within this directory are accessible. Likewise, the file browser is limited to the specified directory subtree.
-rn
Sets column used to limit the "Justify" command's right margin
-s speller
Specify an alternate program spell to use when spell checking.
-t
Enable "tool" mode. Intended for when pico is used as the editor within other tools (e.g., Elm, Pnews). Pico will not prompt for save on exit, and will not rename the buffer during the "Write Out" command.
-v
View the file only, disallowing any editing.
-version
Print Pico version and exit.
-w
Disable word wrap (thus allow editing of long lines).
-x
Disable keymenu at the bottom of the screen.
-z
Enable ^Z suspension of pico.
-p
Preserve the "start" and "stop" characters, typically Ctrl-Q and Ctrl-S, which are sometimes used in communications paths to control data flow between devices that operate at different speeds.
-Q quotestr
Set the quote string. Especially useful when composing email, setting this allows the quote string to be checked for when Justifying paragraphs. A common quote string is "> ".
-q
Termcap or terminfo definition for input escape sequences are used in preference to sequences defined by default. This option is only available if pico was compiled with the TERMCAP_WINS define turned on.
-setlocale_ctype
Do setlocale(LC_CTYPE) if available. Default is to not do this setlocale.
-no_setlocale_collate
Do not do setlocale(LC_COLLATE). Default is to do this setlocale.

Lastly, when a running pico is disconnected (i.e., receives a SIGHUP), pico will save the current work if needed before exiting. Work is saved under the current filename with ".save" appended. If the current work is unnamed, it is saved under the filename "pico.save".

 

Bugs

The manner in which lines longer than the display width are dealt is not immediately obvious. Lines that continue beyond the edge of the display are indicated by a '$' character at the end of the line. Long lines are scrolled horizontally as the cursor moves through them.  

Files

pico.save         Unnamed interrupted work saved here.
*.save            Interrupted work on a named file is saved here.
 

Authors

Michael Seibel <mikes@cac.washington.edu>
Laurence Lundblade <lgl@cac.washington.edu>
Pico was originally derived from MicroEmacs 3.6, by Dave G. Conroy.
Pico is a trademark of the University of Washington.
Copyright 1989-2006 by the University of Washington.  

See Also

pine(1)
Source distribution (part of the Pine Message System):

   ftp://ftp.cac.washington.edu/mail/pine.tar.Z

$Date: 2005-04-28 11:28:33 -0700 (Thu, 28 Apr 2005) $

pico Version 4.10


  

pilot

 

Name

pilot - simple file system browser in the style of the Pine Composer  

Syntax

pilot [ options ] [ directory ]  

Description

Pilot is a simple, display-oriented file system browser based on the Pine message system composer. As with Pine, commands are displayed at the bottom of the screen, and context-sensitive help is provided.

Pilot displays the current working directory at the top of the screen. The directory's contents are displayed in columns of file name, file size pairs. Names that are directories are indicated by the name "(dir)" in place of the file size. The parent of the current working directory is indicated by the file name ".." and size of "(parent dir)". File names that are symbolic links to other files are displayed with a file size of "--".

Several basic file manipulation commands are provided: Delete, Rename, Copy, View, Launch, and Edit. The "View" and "Edit" commands operate on text files only. By default, the "View" command displays files using "pine -F", but will respect the environment variable PAGER if set. The "Edit" command simply invokes "pico". The "Launch" command provides a convenient way to either execute the selected file or to run an application on it.

More specific help is available in pilot's online help.  

Options

-a
Display all files including those beginning with a period (.).
-f
Use function keys for commands. This option supported only in conjunction with UW Enhanced NCSA telnet.
-g
Enable "Show Cursor" mode. Cause cursor to be positioned before the current selection rather than placed at the lower left of the display.
-j
Enable "Goto" command. This enables the command to permit explicitly telling pilot which directory to visit.
-m
Enable mouse functionality. This only works when pilot is run from within an X Window System "xterm" window.
-nn
The -nn option enables new mail notification. The n argument is optional, and specifies how often, in seconds, your mailbox is checked for new mail. For example, -n60 causes pilot to check for new mail once every minute. The default interval is 180 seconds, while the minimum allowed is 30. (Note: no space between "n" and the number)
-o dir
Sets operating directory. Only files within the specified directory are accessible and browsing is limited to the specified directory subtree.
-v
Enable single vertical column display.
-x
Disable keymenu at the bottom of the screen.
-z
Enable ^Z suspension of pilot.
-q
Termcap or terminfo definition for input escape sequences are used in preference to sequences defined by default. This option is only available if pilot was compiled with the TERMCAP_WINS define turned on.
-setlocale_ctype
Do setlocale(LC_CTYPE) if available. Default is to not do this setlocale.
-no_setlocale_collate
Do not do setlocale(LC_COLLATE). Default is to do this setlocale.
 

Authors

Michael Seibel <mikes@cac.washington.edu>
Copyright 1994-2006 by the University of Washington.  

See Also

pine(1)
Source distribution (part of the Pine Message System):

   ftp://ftp.cac.washington.edu/mail/pine.tar.Z

$Date: 2005-01-14 12:44:47 -0800 (Fri, 14 Jan 2005) $

pilot Version 1.1


  

mailutil

 

NAME

mailutil - mail utility program  

SYNTAX

mailutil check [-debug] [-verbose] [mailbox]

mailutil create [-debug] [-verbose] new_mailbox

mailutil delete [-debug] [-verbose] mailbox

mailutil rename [-debug] [-verbose] [-rwcopy] old new

mailutil copy [-debug] [-verbose] [-rwcopy] old new

mailutil move [-debug] [-verbose] [-rwcopy] old new

mailutil append [-debug] [-verbose] [-rwcopy] src dst

mailutil appenddelete [-debug] [-verbose] [-rwcopy] src dst

mailutil prune [-debug] [-verbose] mailbox criteria

mailutil transfer [-debug] [-verbose] [-merge m] [-rwcopy] src dst  

DESCRIPTION

mailutil replaces the old chkmail, imapcopy, imapmove, imapxfer, mbxcopy, mbxcreat, and mbxcvt programs.

mailutil check determines whether new mail exists in the given mailbox (the default is INBOX). The number of new messages is defined as the number of messages that have "Recent" status set. If the mailbox contains no new messages, mailutil check will indicate that no new mail is present; otherwise, it will report the number of new messages. In either case, it will also indicate the canonical form of the name of the mailbox.

mailutil create creates a new mailbox with the given name. The mailbox name must not already exist. A mailbox can be created in a particular format by prefixing the name with #driver. followed by the format name and a / character. For example, the command

   mailutil create #driver.mbx/junkmail
will create a new mailbox named "junkmail" in mbx format.

mailutil delete deletes an existing mailbox with the given name.

mailutil rename renames an existing mailbox to a new name (which must not already exist). This only works if the old and new names are in the same mail store. A more general means to rename a mailbox is to do a mailutil copy of the old name to the new name, followed by a mailutil delete of the old name.

mailutil copy creates a new mailbox and copies messages from the old mailbox to the new mailbox. As in mailutil create a mailbox format can be specified with the new mailbox. For example, the command

   mailutil copy INBOX #driver.mbx/INBOX
will copy messages from your existing INBOX to an mbx-format INBOX.

mailutil move is similar to mailutil copy but in addition will also remove (delete and expunge) the messages from the old mailbox after copying them to the new mailbox.

mailutil append and mailutil appenddelete are similar to mailutil copy and mailutil move respecitively except that they do not create the destination mailbox.

mailutil prune prunes the mailbox of messages which match certain criteria, which are in the form of IMAP2 (RFC 1176) SEARCH arguments. For example, the command.

  mailutil prune INBOX "before 1-jan-2004"
will delete and expunge all messages written before January 1, 2004.

mailutil transfer copies an entire hierarchy of mailboxes from the named source to the named destination. Mailboxes are created on the destination as needed. Any error in copying messages will cause the transfer to stop.

Normally, any error in creation will cause the transfer to stop. However, if -merge mode is specified, a merging transfer is performed. The mode argument the type of merge.

-merge prompt indicates that the user should be asked for an alternative name to create. If creating the new name fails, the user will be asked again.

-merge append indicates that it's alright to copy the messages into an existing mailbox with that name. If the mailbox does not exist, the user will be prompted for an alternative name.

-merge suffix=XXXX where XXXX is any string, indicates that an alternative name should be built by appending the given suffix to the name. It that alternative name can't be created, then the user will be prompted for an alternative name.

The source hierarchy consists of all mailboxes which start with the given source name. With the exception of a remote system specification (within "{}" braces), the source name is used as the name of the destination. The destination hierarchy is a prefix applied to any new names being created. For example,

   mailutil transfer foo bar
will copy all mailboxes with names beginning with "foo" to names beginning with "bar" (hence "foobar" will be copied to "barfoobar"). Similarly,

   mailutil transfer "{imap.foo.com}" "{imap.bar.com}old/"
will copy all mailboxes from the imap.foo.com IMAP server to equivalent names starting with "old/" on the imap.bar.com IMAP server.  

FLAGS

The -debug flag prints full debugging telemetry including protocol operations.

The -verbose flag prints verbose (non-error) telemetry.

The -rwcopy flag causes the source mailbox to be open in readwrite mode rather than readonly mode. Normally, mailutil tries to use readonly mode to avoid altering any flags in the source mailbox, but some mailbox types, e.g. POP3, can't be open in readonly mode.  

ARGUMENTS

The arguments are standard c-client mailbox names. A variety of mailbox name formats and types of mailboxes are supported by c-client; examples of the most common forms of names are:

Name
Meaning
INBOX
primary incoming mail folder on the local system
archive/tx-project
mail folder named "tx-project" in "archive" subdirectory of local filesystem home directory
{imapserver.foo.com}INBOX
primary incoming mail folder on IMAP server system "imapserver.foo.com"
{imapserver.foo.com}archive/tx-project
mail folder named "tx-project" in "archive" subdirectory on IMAP server system "imapserver.foo.com"
#news.comp.mail.misc
newsgroup "comp.mail.misc" on local filesystem
{newserver.foo.com/nntp}comp.mail.misc
newsgroup "comp.mail.misc" on NNTP server system "newserver.foo.com"
{popserver.foo.com/pop3}
mail folder on POP3 server system "popserver.foo.com"

See your system manager for more information about the types of mailboxes which are available on your system.  

RESTRICTIONS

You must surround a {host}mailbox argument with quotation marks if you run mailutil from csh(1) or another shell for which braces have special meaning.

You must surround a #driver.format/mailbox argument with quotation marks if you run mailutil from a shell in which "#" is the comment character.  

AUTHOR

Mark Crispin, MRC@CAC.Washington.EDU

mailutil May 18, 2004


  

rpload

 

NAME

rpload - pine remote data utility  

SYNTAX

rpload [ -f ] [ -s trimSize ] -t Type -l Local_file -r Remote_folder  

DESCRIPTION

Rpload may be used to convert local Pine configuration files or address books into remote configurations or address books. It is intended to be used by system administrators. Regular users should normally use the facilities provided within Pine.

Local_file will usually be a user's pine configuration file, and Remote_folder is the IMAP folder which will be used (with the help of Pine's -p, -P, and -x commands or PINECONF, PINERC, and PINERCEX environment variables) as the user's remote configuration folder. A copy of Local_file will be placed in the folder with the correct header lines to satisfy Pine.

-f
Force the load even if the remote folder is in the wrong format. This will delete the contents of the folder so use it carefully.
-s trimSize
If the number of messages in the remote folder is more than one plus trimsize (one is for the header message), then messages 2, 3, and so on will be deleted until there are only one plus trimsize messages left. If this option is not set no trimming will be done.
-t Type
The possible Types are pinerc, abook, and sig. (Sig is mostly obsolete. Literal signatures contained within the remote pinerc should be used instead.)
-l Local_file
The file on this system that is to be copied.
-r Remote_folder
A remote folder name to be copied to. See the Pine documentation for the syntax of a remote folder name. One example is
{my.imap.server}remote_pinerc.
 

DIAGNOSTICS

Exit status is zero if all goes well, -1 otherwise.  

SEE ALSO

Rpdump(1).

Copyright 1989-2006 by the University of Washington. Pine and Pico are trademarks of the University of Washington.

$Date: 2005-01-14 12:44:47 -0800 (Fri, 14 Jan 2005) $


  

rpdump

 

NAME

rpdump - pine remote data utility  

SYNTAX

rpdump [ -f ] -l Local_file -r Remote_folder  

DESCRIPTION

Rpdump may be used to copy the actual data from remote Pine configuration files or address books into a local file. It is intended to be used by system administrators. Regular users should normally use the facilities provided within Pine.

Local_file will normally be a local temporary file. Remote_folder is the IMAP folder being used as a remote Pine configuration (with the help of Pine's -P, -p, and -x commands or PINECONF, PINERC, and PINERCEX environment variables) or remote Pine address book folder. A copy of the data from Remote_folder will be copied to Local_file.

-f
Force the dump even if the remote folder is in an unrecognized format.
-l Local_file
The file on this system that is to be copied to.
-r Remote_folder
A remote folder name to be copied from. See the Pine documentation for the syntax of a remote folder name. One example is
{my.imap.server}remote_pinerc.
 

DIAGNOSTICS

Exit status is zero if all goes well, -1 otherwise.  

SEE ALSO

Rpload(1).

Copyright 1989-2006 by the University of Washington. Pine and Pico are trademarks of the University of Washington.

$Date: 2005-01-14 12:44:47 -0800 (Fri, 14 Jan 2005) $

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