UW Today

New documentary on cabled ocean observatory airs on UWTV

A new half-hour documentary about a UW research expedition to Axial Seamount, an underwater volcano off the Washington coast, airs tonight at 9:30 p.m. on UWTV.

Amazon River exhales virtually all carbon taken up by rain forest

A study published this week in Nature Geoscience shows that woody plant matter is almost completely digested by bacteria living in the Amazon River, and that this tough stuff plays a major part in fueling the river’s breath.

Using earthquake sensors to track endangered whales

Oceanographers are using a growing number of seafloor seismometers, devices that record seafloor vibrations, to carry out inexpensive and non-invasive studies of endangered whales.

UW research vessel Clifford A. Barnes marks its 1,000th cruise

This week marks the 1000th cruise for the UW’s Clifford A. Barnes research vessel, a converted tugboat that has spent decades exploring Puget Sound and Pacific Northwest waters and is now reaching the end of its UW career.

Preparing to install the world’s largest underwater observatory

Engineers at the UW’s Applied Physics Laboratory are under pressure to build and test parts for installation this summer in the world’s largest deep-ocean observatory off the Washington and Oregon coasts.

Space-age domes offer a window on ocean acidification

At Friday Harbor Labs, students are conducting a three-week study on the effects of ocean acidification using a strategy that’s midway between a controlled lab test and an open-ocean experiment.

Tracking sediments’ fate in largest-ever dam removal

Any day now, the world’s largest dam-removal project will release a century’s worth of sediment . For geologists, it’s a unique opportunity to study natural and engineered river systems.

UW undergraduates embark on three-week research cruise off Japan

Eleven UW undergraduates leave today on an unusually ambitious research and teaching expedition to study the Kuroshio Current off Japan.

Award recognizes UW oceanographer’s talent for engaging public

The American Geophysical Union has presented its top prize for engaging the public in science to UW’s John Delaney.

Underwater ‘electrical outlets’ put in place for cabled ocean observatory project

The first U.S. cabled ocean observatory reached a milestone on July 14 with the installation of a node 9,500 feet deep off the coast of Oregon. Like a giant electrical outlet on the seafloor that also provides Internet connectivity, the node was spliced into a network of cable segments totalling some 560 miles that were

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