UW Today

Scientists review the ecological effects of sea ice loss

A UW atmospheric scientist is co-author of a review paper, published this week in the journal Science, looking at the ecological consequences of sea ice decline.

Hazy days of summer: Southeast U.S. field work measures mercury, smog

Dozens of atmospheric scientists, including three University of Washington faculty members, are taking part in what’s being described as one of the largest atmospheric field campaigns in decades.

Pollution in Northern Hemisphere helped cause 1980s African drought

Air pollution in the Northern Hemisphere in the mid-20th century cooled the upper half of the planet and pushed rain bands south, contributing to the prolonged and worsening drought in Africa’s Sahel region. Clean air legislation in the 1980s reversed the trend and the drought lessened.

Keeping beverages cool in summer: It’s not just the heat, it’s the humidity

Drops forming on the outside of your drink don’t just make the can slippery. Experiments show that in hot, humid weather, condensation heats a drink more than the surrounding air.

Remote clouds responsible for climate models’ glitch in tropical rainfall

One of the most persistent biases in global climate models is due to poor simulation of cloud cover thousands of miles to the south.

Changes in cloud distribution explain some weather patterns

Regional cloud changes may be as important for climate change as the overall amount of cloud cover.

Smartphones, tablets help UW researchers improve storm forecasts

Atmospheric scientists are using pressure readings from some new smartphones and tablet computers to improve short-term thunderstorm forecasts. A weather station in every pocket would offer an unprecedented wealth of data.

International study: Where there’s smoke or smog, there’s climate change

A new international assessment found that soot, or black carbon, is a major contributor to global warming — second only to carbon dioxide.

In rain and snow at home, Seahawks much more likely to win

The Seahawks win four times as many home games as they lose when the weather is inclement, compared to less than two to one when it’s not.

Plumes across the Pacific deliver thousands of microbial species to West Coast

Microorganisms – 99 percent more kinds than had been reported in findings published just four months ago – are hitching rides in the upper troposphere from Asia.

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