UW Today

Citizen science key to keeping pace with environmental change

Better integration of citizen science into professional science is a growing consideration at the UW and elsewhere.

Migrating animals’ pee affects ocean chemistry

Tiny animals migrating from the ocean’s surface to the sunless depths helps shape our oceans. During the daylight hours below the surface the animals release ammonia, the equivalent of our urine, that plays a significant role in marine chemistry, particularly in low-oxygen zones.

UW fusion reactor concept could be cheaper than coal

University of Washington engineers have designed a concept for a fusion reactor that, when scaled up to the size of a large electrical power plant, would rival costs for a new coal-fired plant with similar electrical output.

Toddlers regulate behavior to avoid making adults angry

UW researchers have found that children as young as 15 months can detect anger in other people’s social interactions and then modify their own behavior.

Not stuff of musty museums: Enlist evolutionary biology against modern threats

Using evolutionary biology is one way to try to outwit evolution where it is happening too quickly and to perhaps find accommodations when evolution occurs too slowly.

UW’s Jeffrey Heer wins award to support data visualization research

Jeffrey Heer, a University of Washington associate professor of computer science and engineering, has received an award from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation to develop new theories, tools and techniques for data visualization that help scientists see and understand big data.

Dying brain cells cue new brain cells to grow in songbird

Using a songbird as a model, scientists have described a brain pathway that replaces cells that have been lost naturally and not because of injury.

Snail shells show high-rise plateau is much lower than it used to be

Geologists have long debated when and how the Tibetan Plateau reached a 14,000-foot-plus elevation, but new UW-led research shows it once was probably even higher.

Join expedition online: UW students help install cabled deep-sea observatory

UW students have had a unique experience off the coast of Washington and Oregon helping scientists and engineers complete construction of the world’s largest deep-ocean observatory.

Reflected smartphone transmissions enable gesture control

University of Washington engineers have developed a new form of low-power wireless sensing technology that lets users “train” their smartphones to recognize and respond to specific hand gestures near the phone.

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