UW Today

World population to keep growing this century, hit 11 billion by 2100

A study by the UW and the United Nations finds that the number of people on Earth is likely to reach 11 billion by 2100, about 2 billion higher than widely cited previous estimates.

Health Sciences Digest: Wearable Artificial Kidney, worker wellness, chromosome sort safeguard

Health Sciences Digest: Wearable Artificial Kidney safety testing to begin, low-wage workers value employer wellness initiatives, cells simply avoid chromosome errors

Questions of race, state violence explored in ‘The Rising Tide of Color’

Moon Ho Jung, associate professor of history, discusses the book he edited, “The Rising Tide of Color: Race, State Violence and Radical Movements across the Pacific,” published by University of Washington Press.

UW-built sensors to probe Antarctica’s Southern Ocean

Floating sensors built at the UW will be central to a new $21 million effort to learn how the ocean surrounding Antarctica influences climate.

Documents that Changed the World: The Star Spangled Banner turns 200

Information School Professor Joe Janes takes a look at “The Star Spangled Banner” for his Documents that Changed the World series.

Geneticist Mary-Claire King to receive Lasker Foundation Award

Mary-Clare King, a world leader in cancer genetics and the application of genetics to justice for human rights violations, will be honored by the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation.

California blue whales rebound from whaling; first of their kin to do so

The number of California blue whales has rebounded to near historical levels and, while the number of blue whales struck by ships is likely above allowable U.S. limits, such strikes do not immediately threaten that recovery.

Predicting when toxic algae will reach Washington and Oregon coasts

Better understanding of how a deadly algae grows offshore and gets carried to Pacific Northwest beaches has led to a computer model that can predict when the unseen threat will hit local beaches.

Health Sciences News Digest

Latest news from the UW Health Sciences: Comparative genomes, open notes, teaching Ebola, depression in women

Changing temperature powers sensors in hard-to-reach places

University of Washington researchers have taken inspiration from a centuries-old clock design and created a power harvester that uses natural fluctuations in temperature and pressure as its power source.

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