UW Today

Snail shells show high-rise plateau is much lower than it used to be

Geologists have long debated when and how the Tibetan Plateau reached a 14,000-foot-plus elevation, but new UW-led research shows it once was probably even higher.

Reflected smartphone transmissions enable gesture control

University of Washington engineers have developed a new form of low-power wireless sensing technology that lets users “train” their smartphones to recognize and respond to specific hand gestures near the phone.

Poverty, income inequality increase in Washington state

The number of Washingtonians living in poverty jumped by more than 50,000 from 2012 to 2013, and the state poverty rate rose as well, according to new U.S. Census Bureau data released Thursday.

World population to keep growing this century, hit 11 billion by 2100

A study by the UW and the United Nations finds that the number of people on Earth is likely to reach 11 billion by 2100, about 2 billion higher than widely cited previous estimates.

Freshman Convocation opens UW’s 2014-15 school year

UW President Michael Young will be the featured speaker at the 31st annual Freshman Convocation Sept. 21 in the Alaska Airlines Arena at Hec Edmundson Pavilion.

Correcting the record: WSU consultant’s medical school study deeply flawed

The study prepared by Washington State University consultant MGT of America to make the case for a WSU medical school contains a number of deep flaws. Many of the key justifications cited for starting, funding, and accrediting a second public medical school in Washington are based upon faulty assumptions, omissions, and erroneous data that draw

UW-built sensors to probe Antarctica’s Southern Ocean

Floating sensors built at the UW will be central to a new $21 million effort to learn how the ocean surrounding Antarctica influences climate.

California blue whales rebound from whaling; first of their kin to do so

The number of California blue whales has rebounded to near historical levels and, while the number of blue whales struck by ships is likely above allowable U.S. limits, such strikes do not immediately threaten that recovery.

Predicting when toxic algae will reach Washington and Oregon coasts

Better understanding of how a deadly algae grows offshore and gets carried to Pacific Northwest beaches has led to a computer model that can predict when the unseen threat will hit local beaches.

Changing temperature powers sensors in hard-to-reach places

University of Washington researchers have taken inspiration from a centuries-old clock design and created a power harvester that uses natural fluctuations in temperature and pressure as its power source.

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