UW Today

Orphanage care linked to thinner brain tissue in regions related to ADHD

Psychological studies of children who began life in Romanian orphanages shows that institutionalization is linked to physical changes in brain structure. The thinning of the cortex leaves a lasting legacy that can explain impulsivity and inattention years later.

Citizen science key to keeping pace with environmental change

Better integration of citizen science into professional science is a growing consideration at the UW and elsewhere.

Migrating animals’ pee affects ocean chemistry

Tiny animals migrating from the ocean’s surface to the sunless depths helps shape our oceans. During the daylight hours below the surface the animals release ammonia, the equivalent of our urine, that plays a significant role in marine chemistry, particularly in low-oxygen zones.

Jackson School centers receive $16 million for international education

The University of Washington’s Jackson School of International Studies has received funding from the U.S. Department of Education for all eight of its Title VI centers — with grants of more than $16 million to be awarded over four years.

UW fusion reactor concept could be cheaper than coal

University of Washington engineers have designed a concept for a fusion reactor that, when scaled up to the size of a large electrical power plant, would rival costs for a new coal-fired plant with similar electrical output.

Toddlers regulate behavior to avoid making adults angry

UW researchers have found that children as young as 15 months can detect anger in other people’s social interactions and then modify their own behavior.

University of Washington and Washington State University announce Memorandum of Understanding on medical education expansion

SPOKANE, Wash. – Leadership at the University of Washington and Washington State University today announced they have reached an agreement that will mutually dissolve their WWAMI partnership and provide a pathway to pursue separate solutions to address the state’s medical education needs and physician shortage. In order to provide the greatest benefit to the state

Not stuff of musty museums: Enlist evolutionary biology against modern threats

Using evolutionary biology is one way to try to outwit evolution where it is happening too quickly and to perhaps find accommodations when evolution occurs too slowly.

UW’s Jeffrey Heer wins award to support data visualization research

Jeffrey Heer, a University of Washington associate professor of computer science and engineering, has received an award from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation to develop new theories, tools and techniques for data visualization that help scientists see and understand big data.

Dying brain cells cue new brain cells to grow in songbird

Using a songbird as a model, scientists have described a brain pathway that replaces cells that have been lost naturally and not because of injury.

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