UW Today

Large X-ray scanner to produce 3-D images for labs across campus

A state-of-the-art imaging machine is coming to the University of Washington for use by researchers in a variety of disciplines.

U.S. Navy awards $8 million to develop wave, tidal energy technology

The UW has an $8 million, four-year contract to develop technologies that can harness waves, tides and currents to power naval facilities worldwide.

Athletics initiatives, barriers to sustainability topics for Sustainability Summit

Theannual one-day Sustainability Summit this year is the centerpiece of a new weeklong SustainableUW Festival.

Citizen science key to keeping pace with environmental change

Better integration of citizen science into professional science is a growing consideration at the UW and elsewhere.

Migrating animals’ pee affects ocean chemistry

Tiny animals migrating from the ocean’s surface to the sunless depths helps shape our oceans. During the daylight hours below the surface the animals release ammonia, the equivalent of our urine, that plays a significant role in marine chemistry, particularly in low-oxygen zones.

Not stuff of musty museums: Enlist evolutionary biology against modern threats

Using evolutionary biology is one way to try to outwit evolution where it is happening too quickly and to perhaps find accommodations when evolution occurs too slowly.

Dying brain cells cue new brain cells to grow in songbird

Using a songbird as a model, scientists have described a brain pathway that replaces cells that have been lost naturally and not because of injury.

Join expedition online: UW students help install cabled deep-sea observatory

UW students have had a unique experience off the coast of Washington and Oregon helping scientists and engineers complete construction of the world’s largest deep-ocean observatory.

UW-built sensors to probe Antarctica’s Southern Ocean

Floating sensors built at the UW will be central to a new $21 million effort to learn how the ocean surrounding Antarctica influences climate.

California blue whales rebound from whaling; first of their kin to do so

The number of California blue whales has rebounded to near historical levels and, while the number of blue whales struck by ships is likely above allowable U.S. limits, such strikes do not immediately threaten that recovery.

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