UW Today

New study shows three abrupt pulses of CO2 during last deglaciation

Increases of atmospheric carbon dioxide that helped end the last ice age more than 10,000 years ago happened in three abrupt pulses, not gradually.

Science communication should consider cultural perspectives

New research suggests that considering differences among a variety of cultures can have an impact on how well science and scientific concepts are communicated to the public.

Snail shells show high-rise plateau is much lower than it used to be

Geologists have long debated when and how the Tibetan Plateau reached a 14,000-foot-plus elevation, but new UW-led research shows it once was probably even higher.

Notice of possible rule making: Preproposal statement of inquiry

Subject of Possible Rule Making: Chapter 478-120 WAC, Student Conduct Code for the University of Washington.

UW project becomes a focal point in hunt for dark matter

The UW has one of three experiments aimed at detecting elusive dark matter in the universe that have gotten a big financial boost.

Seymour Rabinovitch leaves a long UW legacy in chemistry

Seymour Rabinovitch, 95, a professor emeritus who spent four decades in the UW Chemistry Department, died Aug. 2.

Rebuilding part of the Large Hadron Collider – with Legos

UW students used Legos to build a replica of the Atlas detector, part of the Large Hadron Collider that made physics history. (With video)

Oso disaster had its roots in earlier landslides

The UW is part of a new study that shows the disastrous landslide that killed 43 people at Oso, Washington, involved the “remobilization” of a 2006 landslide in the same place.

Geophysicists prep for massive ‘ultrasound’ of Mount St. Helens

Dozens of geophysicists and volunteers will deploy 3,500 seismic sensors at Mount St. Helens next week in an unprecedented study of the volcano’s plumbing.

Scientists ready to study magma formation beneath Mount St. Helens

Scientists are embarking on research to improve volcanic eruption forecasting by learning more about how a deep-underground feeder system creates and supplies magma to Mount St. Helens.

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