UW Today

Fruit flies – fermented-fruit connoisseurs – are relentless party crashers

That fruit fly appearing moments after you poured that first glass of cabernet, has just used a poppy-seed-sized brain to conduct a finely-choreographed search and arrive in time for happy hour.

Deaths attributed directly to climate change cast pall over penguins

Climate change is killing penguin chicks from the world’s largest colony of Magellanic penguins, not just indirectly but directly because of drenching rainstorms and heat.

Environmental sciences lab ups bar for green labs at UW

A soils lab has achieved the highest score yet in the University of Washington’s 10-month-old Green Laboratory Certification Program.

Montlake Triangle/Rainier Vista project breaks ground, expect Burke-Gilman detour

Burke-Gilman Trail users will see a detour starting the early weeks of February as work on the Montlake Triangle Project ­– the triangular area from the corner of Northeast Pacific and Montlake to Stevens Way – gets underway.

DNA detectives able to ‘count’ thousands of fish using as little as a glass of water

A mere glass full of water from a 1.2 million-gallon aquarium tank is all scientists really needed to identify most of the 13,000 fish swimming there.

Big is not bad: Scientists call for preservation of large carnivores

Despite their scary reputation, carnivores deserve credit for all kinds of ecological services when they eat grazing animals that gobble down young trees and other vegetation that could be holding carbon and protecting streams.

Sinuous skeletons, glowing blue and crimson, leap from lab to art world

Fish “stripped” to their skeletons and stained for UW research are now part of an art exhibit at the Seattle Aquarium.

December deadlines approach for Awards of Excellence nominations

Nominations are due in December and coming months for this year’s University of Washington Awards of Excellence categories.

Floods didn’t provide nitrogen ‘fix’ for earliest crops in frigid north

Floods didn’t make floodplains fertile during the dawn of human agriculture in the Earth’s far north. Turns out early human inhabitants can mainly thank cyanobacteria. It raises the question of whether modern farmers might reduce fertilizer use by taking advantage of cyanobacteria that occur, not just in the floodplains studied, but in soils around the world.

Dogs in dawg regalia, class of 2033 in diapers – vote now for W Day photos

A Husky Spirit Photo Contest is part of the runup to this year’s W Day, Friday, Oct. 25.

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