Best & Brightests  
 



UW AWARDS 2008 HOMEPAGE

UWEEK.ORG HOMEPAGE

DISTINGUISHED TEACHING AWARD
Ben Kerr, Biology
Gowri Shankar, Business Administration
Jaime Olavarria, Psychology
Jamie Walker, Ceramics
Julia Parrish, Aquatic and Fishery Sciences / Biology
Rebecca Aanerud, Women Studies
Richard Knuth, Education Administration

EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING AWARD
Fernanda Oyarzun & Chris Himes , Biology
Rachel Goldberg, English

DISTINGUISHED LIBRARIAN AWARD
Theresa Mudrock, UW Libraries

DISTINGUISHED STAFF AWARD
Hendrik Simons, Nuclear Physics Laboratory
Mona Pitre-Collins, Undergraduate Scholarship Office
Philip Mote, Climate Impacts Group
Robin Bennett, Medical Genetics
Sue Park, Facilities Services

DISTINGUISHED CONTRIBUTIONS TO LIFELONG LEARNING AWARD
John Schaufelberger, Construction Management

OUTSTANDING PUBLIC SERVICE AWARD
Nancy Amidei, Social Work

JAMES D. CLOWES AWARD FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF LEARNING COMMUNITIES
Lance Bennett, Political Science / Communication

S. STERLING MUNRO PUBLIC SERVICE TEACHING AWARD
Denise Wilson, Electrical Engineering

DAVID B. THORUD LEADERSHIP AWARD
Judy Mahoney, College of Engineering
Kathleen Woodward, Simpson Center for the Humanities

MARSHA L. LANDOLT DISTINGUISHED GRADUATE MENTOR AWARD
Tom Quinn, Aquatic and Fishery Sciences

ALUMNUS SUMMA LAUDE DIGNATA
Beverly Cleary, Children's Author

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD
Robb Weller, Television Producer and Host

PRESIDENT'S MEDAL
June Shujun Peng and Royce Anderson

"The large number of papers I have with students is not a reflection of how generous I am with credit and what a nice guy I am. The number reflects what a great group of students I have had, how productive and collaborative they are, and their willingness to share credit with me."


Tom Quinn


"Tom is probably the most published member of the faculty at the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences and by now has published close to 200 papers," writes colleague Lorenz Hauser of professor Tom Quinn. "Most of these publications are in collaboration with both graduate and undergraduate students, and this opportunity for publication is clearly very important for his students, in terms of career development, but maybe more as a crucial lesson of scientific endeavor.

"I know it is one of Tom's primary goals to teach students to write and to provide them with the opportunity to publish and make a name for themselves. His input in these publications is considerable in terms of training, guidance and style, but he leaves sufficient room for students to develop their own ideas."

The numbers speak for themselves. For example, from 2005 until now, Quinn is lead author or co-author on 40 papers that have been published or are in press. On all but 15 of those, one or more students are lead authors or co-authors.

"The large number of papers I have with students is not a reflection of how generous I am with credit and what a nice guy I am," Quinn says. "The number reflects what a great group of students I have had, how productive and collaborative they are, and their willingness to share credit with me."

Andrew Dittman, now with the federal Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, wrote, "Just recently Tom jokingly suggested to me that his career has evolved to the point that his current students don't work for him, he works for them. As I mulled this over, it occurred to me that this has been true of all of Tom's career as a mentor. His primary focus is often helping and promoting his student's studies and careers, often at the expense of his own personal and professional interests or time."

Dittman came to the UW with a background in biochemistry and became interested in the mechanisms underlying salmon's ability to smell and return to where they were born.

"My Ph.D. project involved both animal behavior (an area of expertise for Tom) and laboratory biochemistry (not an area of expertise for Tom). Despite my straying into areas unfamiliar to him, he actively encouraged my pursuit of ideas and techniques...and directed me to other faculty who might lend support or knowledge."

Other students also admire Quinn's wide-ranging interests. Stephanie Carlson wrote, "He is a wellspring of ideas and loves discussing potential projects with students. Students often follow through on these ideas even if unrelated to their primary research -- every senior student in the lab is involved with at least one such project. For instance, I have published five peer-reviewed papers with Tom that are completely unrelated to my dissertation research."

Recently hired as a faculty member at the University of California, Berkeley, she wrote that "Tom strongly encouraged me to apply for this position even though the application was due before I had even defended my dissertation. I was hesitant, unsure of myself, and not very optimistic about my chances but, with Tom's encouragement, I applied."

Quinn, a UW faculty member since 1986 and one of the world's top experts on salmon behavior, has had 12 doctoral and 30 master's students graduate. Three more master's candidates graduate this quarter.

Professor Ray Hilborn says Quinn has been very successful at getting his students networked in both academic and agency systems, and making sure they attend conferences and present their work.

"His students have an outstanding record of graduation, publication and job placement," Hilborn wrote.

For example, former student Andrew Hendry, now on the faculty of McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, wrote that he gave his first scientific presentation at a conference within a year of starting his master's program. Before he earned his doctorate, he'd given talks at 15 national or international meetings.

"But perhaps the greatest testament to Tom's commitment is illustrated by one of his students who did not finish. In the fall of 1992, one of Tom's Ph.D. students, John Konecki, died in an airplane accident...Tom promised John's parents that he would see the work through to completion. With the help of another student, Carol Woody, three papers were eventually published from John's data."

"This above all reflects Tom's commitment to his graduate students and stands out to me as his greatest achievement."