September 13, 2012

Arts Roundup: Student theater, Native American films — and the Burke gets buggy

News and Information

uw press books slave narrative Lewis Clarke University of Washington

UW Press

“Narrative of the Sufferings of Lewis Clarke, During a Captivity of More Than Twenty-Five Years, among the Algerines of Kentucky, One of the So Called Christian States of North America,” an 1845 slave narrative, has been reprinted by University of Washington Press.

The last couple of weeks before fall quarter begins are like the calm before the storm. In this otherwise quiet week, UWTV starts a new series featuring Native American filmmakers, the Undergraduate Theater Society sets its 2012-13 lineup and the Burke Museum goes buggy.

Also, University of Washington Press reprints a powerful 1845 slave narrative written by the great-grandfather of a member of the UW community.

Bug Blast, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sept. 16. A family-friendly event at the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, where thousands of specimens — living and not so much living — will be on display, including African butterflies shown for the first time on campus. Get eye-to-eye with giant walking sticks, try some buggy snacks and watch presentations by The Bug Chicks, who say they are just “two scientists who take time off from their research to inspire all of us to find our inner ‘bugdork.’” Learn more at the Burke website.

Charlotte Cote and Dan Hart host Voices of the First Peoples on UWTV

Charlotte Cote’ and Daniel Hart, UW professors of American Indian Studies, host the UWTV series “Voices of the First Peoples.”

“Voices of the First Peoples,” UWTV, 7 p.m., Sept. 16. The premiere of a series showcasing films created by Native American filmmakers, including many films produced through the UW’s Native Voices program. The series also includes award-winning PBS films exploring the themes of identity, survival, racism and exploitation, children, history, community and activism — and opening a window into First People’s issues, culture and history. Hosted by Charlotte Cote’ and Daniel Hart, UW professors of American Indian Studies. Sundays at 7 p.m.

“Narrative of the Sufferings of Lewis Clarke…” new from UW Press. Lewis George Clarke (1812-1897) published the story of his life as a slave in 1845, after he had escaped from Kentucky and become a well-regarded abolitionist lecturer throughout the North.

He lived in Cambridge, Mass., in the 1840s, where he met Harriet Beecher Stowe, Frederick Douglass, John Brown and others. Stowe identified Clarke as the prototype for the character George Harris in her 1852 novel “Uncle Tom’s Cabin.”

University of Washington Press has now republished this narrative in a facsimile edition introduced by Clarke’s great-grandson, Carver Clark Gayton of Seattle, who has been a lecturer at the Evans School of Public Affairs as well as executive director of the Northwest African American Museum.

Titled “Narrative of the Sufferings of Lewis Clarke, During a Captivity of More Than Twenty-Five Years, among the Algerines of Kentucky, One of the So Called Christian States of North America,” the book was the first work by a slave to be acquired by the Library of Congress and placed under copyright.

Undergraduate theater season announced

The Undergraduate Theater Society has announced its 2012-13 season.

Undergraduate Theater Society 2012-13 schedule The student theater group plans to present a Hitchcock piece, a Lanford Wilson play, a verse adaptation of the Cyrano story and a lively Bob Fosse musical from the 1970s. All plays will be in the Hutchinson Cabaret Theater.

  • “Five Flights,” by Adam Brock, directed by Dylan Ward, October 18-28.
  • “Pippin,” by Stephen Schwartz and Roger O. Hirson, directed by Kelsey Thorgalsen, Nov. 29-Dec. 9.
  • “Burn This,” by Lanford Wilson, directed by Mary Hubert, Jan. 24-Feb. 3, 2013.
  • “Cyrano,” by Barry Kornhauser and Edmond Rostand, directed by Ben Phillips, Feb. 28-March 10, 2013.
  • “The 39 Steps,” by Patrick Barlow and Alfred Hitchcock, directed by Andrew Pritzkau, May 30-June 9, 2013.

Next week: The Littlefield Organ goes for Baroque (and Renaissance).