UW Today

February 16, 2011

Dinosaur hunter Philip Currie to speak at UW Feb. 25

News and Information

For the second year in a row, the Burke Museum is bringing one of the worlds most renowned experts on dinosaur paleontology to the UW for a free public lecture.

Philip Currie with a fossil of Crylophosaurus, a meat-eating dinosaur from the Jurassic age.

Philip Currie with a fossil of Crylophosaurus, a meat-eating dinosaur from the Jurassic age.

Last year Jack Horner visited; this year, the Burke is bringing Philip Currie to the UW campus for a talk titled Hunting Dinosaurs on Four Continents.

Currie will speak at 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 25, in 130 Kane. Online pre-registration is required to guarantee a seat.

Dinosaurs are arguably the most successful large terrestrial animals to live on Earth. They dominated the landscape for more than 130 million years and continue to be successful through their direct descendants, birds. Currie will discuss his travels uncovering dinosaur fossils from the four corners of the globe in order to learn how these amazingly diverse animals were so successful for so long.

Currie is a professor and Canada Research Chair in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Alberta. His research focuses on the growth and variation of extinct reptiles, the anatomy and relationships of carnivorous dinosaurs, and the origin of birds. He has given hundreds of popular and scientific lectures about dinosaurs all over the world. He recently returned from a paleontological expedition to Antarctica.

For more information about the Burke Museum and its programs, visit its website.