Health Services and Quality of Care Research Fellowship
Faculty

Fellowship Co-Directors

K. Casey Lion, MD, MPH
Program Co-Director
Assistant Professor
Division of General Pediatrics and Hospital Medicine

Casey Lion is an assistant professor of pediatrics in the division of general pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine. She is an NIH-funded researcher focusing on improving the quality of health care for children from low income, minority, and limited English proficient families, with a current emphasis on communication between providers and families. Her methodological expertise relates to rigorous evaluation of quality improvement interventions.

Dr. Lion's undergraduate degree was in English from Princeton University, and she attended medical school at the University of California, San Francisco. Her interest in health care disparities and improving health care for children in lower resource settings prompted her to pursue a Master in Public Health degree at the University of California, Berkeley. She completed her residency training in pediatrics in 2010 and her quality of care research fellowship in 2013, both at the University of Washington and Seattle Children’s Hospital and Research Institute. In addition to her research, she also precepts pediatric residents in continuity clinic, the newborn nursery, and on the general pediatric inpatient service.

Bibliography

 

Arti D. Desai, MD, MSPH
Program Co-Director
Assistant Professor
Division of General Pediatrics and Hospital Medicine

Arti Desai completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Michigan and her medical degree at Wayne State University School of Medicine. She went on to complete her residency training in Pediatrics at Stanford University/Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. After 3 years of practicing hospital medicine in San Francisco, Dr. Desai decided to pursue a research career and completed the Health Services and Quality of Care Research Fellowship at the University of Washington, earning a Master of Science degree in Public Health (health services focus).

Her initial research examined pediatric health-related quality of life outcomes in hospitalized patients. She has also been involved in the development and validation of numerous quality measures related to assessing the quality of hospital-to-home transitions from the family perspective. She was awarded an APA Young Investigator Award for this work. Dr. Desai’s current research focuses on leveraging innovative health information technology to improve care coordination outcomes for children with medical complexity, with a focus on shared care plans. She was awarded an AHRQ-funded K08 Patient-Centered Outcomes Research (PCOR) Mentored Clinical Investigator Award and a Pediatric Early Research Career (PERC) award from the Seattle Children’s Research Institute to pursue this research. Dr. Desai enjoys mentoring other faculty and students in qualitative research and applying human-centered design principles to health services research.

Bibliography

 

Faculty

Faisal Malik, MD, MSHS
Assistant Professor
Divisions of Endocrinology and General Pediatrics and Hospital Medicine

Dr. Malik is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Washington (UW), an Investigator at the Center for Child Heath, Behavior and Development (CCHBD) at Seattle Children's Research Institute, and a pediatric endocrinologist at Seattle Children's Hospital. He is funded by the National Institutes of Health and the American Diabetes Association. As an investigator in the CCHBD, Dr. Malik leads the Improving Diabetes Outcomes Team focused on developing and investigating the effectiveness of patient-centered interventions that improve self-efficacy in diabetes management and ultimately, health outcomes for youth and young adults with diabetes. He is currently involved with three different studies designed to improve health outcomes in youth with diabetes:

  • The use of social media to support diabetes management in youth with type 1 diabetes (NIH);
  • The use of systematically designed external incentives to increase adolescent participation to type 1 diabetes self-care behaviors (ADA);
  • The use of a resilience resource intervention to reduce diabetes distress in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (NIH).

Dr. Malik is also the Director of Research and Co-Medical Director of the UW Adolescent and Young Adult Diabetes Transition Clinic.

 

Douglas P. Opel, MD, MPH
Assistant Professor
Divisions of Bioethics and General Pediatrics and Hospital Medicine

Douglas J. Opel, MD, MPH is a general pediatrician and Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine. He is also Associate Director of the Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics at the Seattle Children's Research Institute.

Dr. Opel’s research interests include provider-parent communication, medical decision-making, and public health ethics. He has been funded from the NIH since 2011 to identify effective communication strategies for use with parents who are hesitant to accept vaccines for their child. Dr. Opel has published articles on pediatric and bioethical issues in major journals, including New England Journal of Medicine, Pediatrics, JAMA Pediatrics, American Journal of Public Health, British Medical Journal, and Hastings Center Report.

 

TumainiRucker Coker, MD, MBA
Associate Professor
Division of General Pediatrics

Tumaini Rucker Coker, MD, MBA is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine, Director of Research at Seattle Children's Center for Diversity & Health Equity, and Principal Investigator at the Seattle Children's Research Institute Center for Child Health, Behavior, and Development. Her research focuses on community-engaged design and evaluation of innovative interventions to reduce socioeconomic disparities of care among children, and on primary care practice redesign for children in low-income communities. She is Principal Investigator for two large, multi-year projects that focus on developing, adapting, and testing interventions to improve the delivery of care to children in low-income communities; these include an NIH-funded multi-site trial of a parent coach-led model for preventive care, and an NIH-funded trial of a parent text messaging program to enhance parent-provider communication about chronic disease management. As Principal Investigator, she recently completed a PCORI-funded project using telehealth to improve access to mental health services for children in low-income communities.

Dr. Coker’s work has been published widely, in journals such as JAMA, Pediatrics, and the American Journal of Public Health, and has been covered by media outlets, including the Wall Street Journal, CNN, USA Today, and NBC. She has received multiple prestigious national awards, including AcademyHealth’s Nemours Child Health Services Research Award, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Herbert W. Nickens Faculty Fellowship, and the National Medical Association’s Council on Concerns of Women Physicians (CCWP) Research Award. Dr. Coker serves on several national committees as well, including the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Committee on Implementing High-Quality Primary Care, and the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Quality Improvement Advisory Committee on Identifying & Managing Social Determinants of Health.

Dr. Coker completed her undergraduate education at Stanford University and received an MBA at the UCLA Anderson School of Management. She received an MD at the Drew/UCLA Medical Program at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, where she was elected to AOA. She completed a pediatric residency at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Dr. Coker was a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at the University of Chicago from 2004-2006. She practices primary care and teaches medical students and residents at Seattle Children’s Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic.

 

 

Frederick P. Rivara, MD, MPH
Professor
Division of General Pediatrics and Hospital Medicine
Vice Chair, Academic Affairs
Department of Pediatrics

Frederick P. Rivara MD, MPH – Dr. Rivara is the holder of the Seattle Children’s Guild Association Endowed Chair in Pediatrics, Vice chair and Professor of Pediatrics and adjunct Professor of Epidemiology at the University of Washington. Dr. Rivara earned a bachelor’s degree at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA and received his MD from the University of Pennsylvania and an MPH from the University of Washington. He completed residencies at the Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Boston and the University of Washington and was a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at the University of Washington. He is editor-in-chief of JAMA Network Open.

He has received numerous honors including the Charles C. Shepard Science Award from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Public Health Association, Injury Control and Emergency Health Services Section Distinguished Career Award, and the American Academy of Pediatrics, Section on Injury and Poison Prevention, Physician Achievement Award, the UW School of Public Health Distinguished Alumni Award, and the UW Medicine Minority faculty Mentoring Award. Rivara was elected to the Institute of Medicine (now National Academy of Medicine) in 2005.

 

Michelle M. Garrison, PhD
Associate Professor
Division of General Pediatrics

Michelle M. Garrison, PhD, is an Associate Professor at the University of Washington with a joint appointment between the the School of Public Health, Department of Health Services and the School of Medicine, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. At the University of Washington, Dr. Garrison is the Director of the Center for Health Innovation and Policy Science, and Associate Director of the MPH/MS program in Health Services where she is the primary advisor for all clinical fellows in the program. She works with colleagues across a variety of clinical fields to help them conduct research on innovative and effective ways to improve the quality of healthcare, and is especially interested in 1) sleep research, 2) optimizing intervention and implementation effectiveness, and 3) methodological research to improve the efficiency of clinical trials and the generalizability of the results. Here at Seattle Childrens, Dr. Garrison's lab primarily focuses on child and adolescent sleep and the dynamic relationships with media use, behavior problems, physical activity, and obesity. She develops family-centered and sustainable health behavior change interventions, and studies the long-term impact of improved sleep on child and adolescent development as well as family health and functioning.

 

Paul Sharek, MD, MPH
Clinical Professor
Division of General Pediatrics

Dr. Paul Sharek graduated from Columbia University Medical School in New York, completed residency and chief residency in pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco, received a Masters of Public Health from University of California, Berkeley and completed a fellowship in health services research (emphasis on quality improvement) at Stanford University.

Paul is presently a Clinical Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Washington, an Emeritus Professor of Pediatrics at Stanford University and a practicing pediatric hospitalist. He is the inaugural Vice President, Chief Quality and Safety Officer at Seattle Children’s, and the architect of the new Seattle Children’s Center for Quality and Patient Safety. Paul was the creator and Medical Director of the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford Center for Quality and Clinical Effectiveness, the 1st Director of Quality Improvement for the California Perinatal Quality of Care Collaborative (CPQCC), was a founding member of the Solutions for Patient Safety Collaborative, and presently participates in Strategic Planning for Quality for CHA (Children’s Hospital Association). In 2013, Paul was awarded the inaugural Paul V. Miles Fellow in Quality Improvement from the American Board of Pediatrics, an Award bestowed on individuals who have “dedicated themselves to quality improvement and demonstrated accomplishments leading to better healthcare for children”. Most recently, Paul has dedicated his research and administrative efforts to translating the tenets of high reliability organization theory into healthcare, and translating pragmatic local, regional and national quality improvement initiative into the medical literature. Paul has given a substantial number of presentations at national and international academic meetings related to quality of care and patient safety, is a faculty member of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), and is an “Expert” and mentor at the International Society for Quality in Healthcare (ISQua) . Paul has been a visiting professor on quality/patient safety at numerous children’s hospitals across the world including Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London, The Hospital for Sick Kids in Toronto, The Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario in Ottawa, and several national children’s hospitals including, Children’s National Hospital in Washington DC, Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of Columbia University, Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles, Children’s Hospital of Colorado, St Louis Children’s Hospital, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, and St Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Paul has published extensively on the topics of pediatric quality of care and patient safety, including a Nov 2007 study correlating a Rapid Response Team intervention with decreased mortality in JAMA, and a Nov 2010 study on adverse events over time in the New England Journal of Medicine, and is recognized internationally as a thought leader in the area of pediatric quality and patient safety.