Health Services and Quality of Care Research Fellowship
Alumni

Casey Lion, MD, MPH
2011-2013

Casey Lion is an assistant professor of pediatrics in the division of general pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine. She is an NIH-funded researcher focusing on improving the quality of health care for children from low income, minority, and limited English proficient families, with a current emphasis on communication between providers and families. Her methodological expertise relates to rigorous evaluation of quality improvement interventions.

Dr. Lion's undergraduate degree was in English from Princeton University, and she attended medical school at the University of California, San Francisco. Her interest in health care disparities and improving health care for children in lower resource settings prompted her to pursue a Master in Public Health degree at the University of California, Berkeley. She completed her residency training in pediatrics in 2010 and her quality of care research fellowship in 2013, both at the University of Washington and Seattle Children’s Hospital and Research Institute. In addition to her research, she also precepts pediatric residents in continuity clinic, the newborn nursery, and on the general pediatric inpatient service.

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Arti D. Desai, MD, MSPH
2012-2014

Arti Desai completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Michigan and her medical degree at Wayne State University School of Medicine. She went on to complete her residency training in Pediatrics at Stanford University/Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. After 3 years of practicing hospital medicine in San Francisco, Dr. Desai decided to pursue a research career and completed the Health Services and Quality of Care Research Fellowship at the University of Washington, earning a Master of Science degree in Public Health (health services focus).

Her initial research examined pediatric health-related quality of life outcomes in hospitalized patients. She has also been involved in the development and validation of numerous quality measures related to assessing the quality of hospital-to-home transitions from the family perspective. She was awarded an APA Young Investigator Award for this work. Dr. Desai’s current research focuses on leveraging innovative health information technology to improve care coordination outcomes for children with medical complexity, with a focus on shared care plans. She was awarded an AHRQ-funded K08 Patient-Centered Outcomes Research (PCOR) Mentored Clinical Investigator Award and a Pediatric Early Research Career (PERC) award from the Seattle Children’s Research Institute to pursue this research. Dr. Desai enjoys mentoring other faculty and students in qualitative research and applying human-centered design principles to health services research.

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Faisal Mailik, MD, MSHS
2013-2016

Faisal Malik earned his bachelor’s degree at the University of Virginia and his medical degree from Albany Medical College. He completed his pediatric residency and fellowship in pediatric endocrinology at the University of Washington and Seattle Children’s Hospital.

Dr. Malik joined the quality of care research fellowship with a strong interest in improving processes, healthcare outcomes, and patient health outcomes in both the inpatient and outpatient management of diabetes in childhood and adolescence. As a pediatric endocrinology fellow he examined patient characteristics associated with frequent hospital admissions for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in children with type 1 diabetes and highlighted the vast differences in readmission outcomes and how hospitals use resources for children hospitalized for DKA in the United States. Dr. Malik also led an innovative home- and community-based intervention called the Diabetes Community Care Ambassador Program aimed at increasing patient and family involvement in the day-to-day diabetes care of youth in order to improve self-care behaviors and glycemic control.

Dr. Malik served a three-year term as the elected Chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Medical Students, Residents, and Fellowship Trainees (SOMSRFT). In that position, he developed and implemented a new strategic plan for the Section and successfully established a permanent SOMSRFT trainee feature in the journal of Pediatrics.

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Carolyn C. Foster, MD, MSHS
2015-2017

Carolyn Foster completed her medical degree at Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts after completion of undergraduate studies in biology at Columbia University in New York. Her medical school thesis focused on the characterization and ideal treatment for children with vascular limb anomalies. She additionally studied the care experience of children with craniofacial anomalies. She received her pediatric residency training at the University of Washington and Seattle Children’s Hospital followed by a year as chief resident. During residency, she received a APA Young Investigator Award to study the hospital-to-home transition of care for children with medical complexity. She joined the Health Services and Quality of Care Research Fellowship with an interest in studying what constitutes high quality patient-centered care for children with medical complexity and how this care paradigm can be aligned with current and future delivery systems to optimize value for patients and their families. Dr. Foster is currently an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Academic General Pediatrics and Primary Care at the Feinberg School of Medicine and Ann & Robert Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago.

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Mersine Bryan, MD, MPH
2016-2018

Mersine Bryan completed her bachelor’s degree at Indiana University and her medical degree from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She received her pediatric residency training at the University of Washington and Seattle Children’s Hospital. After residency, she practiced as a hospitalist and urgent care physician at Seattle Children’s Hospital. Based on her clinical experience, she became interested in the quality of care for general pediatric illness that transition across the spectrum of care, from outpatient to inpatient. Dr. Bryan completed General Academic Pediatric Fellowship funded by the National Service Research Award (NRSA) and earned her Masters of Public Health in Health Services at the University of Washington. During her NRSA fellowship, she developed an additional interest in the quality of health information online and how pediatricians can expand their sphere of influence to provide high quality health information to families. She received the Academic Pediatric Association Young Investigator Award to pursue a project to understand how parents and adolescents access health information online. Through the Health Services and Quality of Care Research Fellowship, Dr. Bryan continued to conduct research aimed at maximizing the quality of care for general pediatric illnesses and how to effectively convey this information to families across different modalities. Dr. Bryan is currently an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Hospital Medicine and General Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine and Seattle Children’s Hospital.

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