Craniofacial Medicine Fellowship
Curriculum

Craniofacial fellows are responsible for the diagnosis and management of craniofacial patients in coordination with surgeons, craniofacial team members, and the primary care provider.

First Year

In year one, training focuses on attaining the clinical skills needed to provide diagnoses, counseling (prenatal and postnatal), and management of children with craniofacial conditions including cleft lip/palate, craniofacial microsomia, craniosynostosis and plagiocephaly.

Second and Third Years

In years two and three, we offer research training opportunities in molecular biology, developmental biology, epidemiology, bioethics, clinical and outcomes research, molecular genetics and public health sciences.

Clinical

Craniofacial fellows attend weekly craniofacial team clinics and weekly pediatric intake/prenatal (pre-adoptive) clinics. For three two-month clinic blocks, fellows also attend these subspecialty clinics: plagiocephaly, dental, sleep medicine, craniofacial genetics, chromosome 22q11 deletion, hearing loss, microtia, and vascular malformation. There are also two three-month rotations on the inpatient craniofacial service. The first rotation includes participation in clinical feeding, Videofluoroscopic Swallowing Studies (VFSS), Velopharangeal Insufficiency Studies (VPI) and audiology evaluations, and the second rotation includes post-surgical care rounds.

Research

Research training opportunities at the University of Washington (UW) and Seattle Children's include molecular biology, developmental biology, epidemiology, bioethics, clinical and outcomes research, molecular genetics and public health sciences. Fellows have the option of pursuing an MPH degree at the UW. We require fellows to present research findings and attend one national meeting annually. Didactic courses, available at the UW or through the Seattle Children's Fellows' College, include biostatistics, clinical and lab research methodology, preparation of applications for funding, critical literature review, biomedical research integrity and teaching skills.

Lecture Series

In addition to the clinical activities outlined above, research opportunities, and the Fellows' College courses, there is a lecture series dedicated entirely to craniofacial medicine topics. Fellows are invited to present cases at the weekly craniofacial team and monthly genetics case conferences, and to present research data at monthly craniofacial research conferences. Although the goal of our three-year fellowship program is to train pediatric providers to become craniofacial team members and successful independent investigators, a one-year clinical program is available to provide clinical geneticists or general academic pediatricians with the skills necessary to become experienced craniofacial team members.